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Redskins Zone Stretch Wco Vs Dallas' 4-3 Tampa-2


Airyx

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This year, the Cowboys switched from Rob Ryan's attacking 3-4 to Monte Kiffin's 4-3 Tampa-2. The difference is night and day.

 

For those that don't know, in its base form a Tampa-2 is this...

 

                     x x x x              

   x              x             x              x

 

                         x

 

                x                    x

 

-The Safeties have deep zone responsibility, each with one half of the field. Hence the name.

 

-Four down linemen

  -The DEs have contain responsibility first, back-side pursuit 2nd.

  -The DTs play a 2-gap, read and react technique. Most of the time, they will not penetrate, but consume blockers and clog the line so that the LBs can make the play.

 

-Three Linebackers

  -The OLBs have underneath zone responsibility first, then react to the run 2nd.

  -The MLB also has an underneath zone, but unlike a normal Cover-2-zone, he is a bit deeper, dropping almost between the Safeties. I call it Cover 2.5.

 

-The CBs have underneath zone coverage over the flats, and boundaries. They will usually stay just outside of the WR, looking back toward the QB, because all of their help is inside.

 

BTW - The Redskins run a Tampa-2 concept out of their 3-4 every once in awhile, but not very often. Kiffin sticks to it, even when it isn't working. That might change after the game against the Broncos. This defense is very much a bend-but-don't-break approach. It is difficult to produce big plays against it, but it allows short gains all the time.

 

How do you attack it?

 

To run against it, the key is to get 2nd level blocking on the MLB (Sean Lee). The 'skins running game is all about the zone blocking scheme. Use the defender's momentum to take him in the direction he is already going, which will produce gaps behind the defender that the RB can use to cut-back. I love how the 'skins O-Line works in concert. You will often see Montgomery give a DT just enough of a push so that Chester can ride his momentum, them Monte will drop off, and go to the 2nd level. These guys really have a feel for each other. Well, that is more difficult to do when your DTs don't actually WANT to go anywhere.

 

There aren't as many cut-back opportunities. You will see many plays where the zone-stretch doesn't give Morris anywhere to go, and he just squeaks out a yard or two in heavy traffic. However, a broken arm tackle, and a good 2nd level block should be able to spring Morris for many 4-11 yard rumbles. Don't expect long runs, don't expect many tackles for a loss.

 

To pass against it, in general, just overload the zones, and sit between them.

 

The bread and butter WCO play, the slant-flat, is an easy play to read and execute against Tampa-2. I described it in detail a few weeks ago in another thread about the Packers.

 

In our case, the pre-snap read is the shading of the CBs over the wide guys. Most of the time, the CBs will be 7 yards off with outside leverage (although Carr will often come up tight because he can). If either side has that outside leverage, then that's the side you pick first.

 

The Post-snap read is the OLB on that side. Carter and Durant both over-react quickly, and are easy to read. If the OLB sits in the slant lane, you throw to the flat, if the OLB breaks on the flat, or play-action, throw to the slant. Three steps and a quick throw right out of bob.

 

RG3 should be able to get Reed and/or Davis on flat routes (with a size mis-match against a CB), or a quick slant to Garcon/Hank all day long. Not big plays, 6-11 yards...over and over again.

 

The converse of this concept, the corner/drag should also move the chains.

 

If you combine these with one Option route, a guy who runs a crossing route, and then stops and sits between zones, you give RG3 easy, fast decisions. Watch the OLB, if he reacts the way you expect throw, if not, hitch step forward looking for the option guy, if that's not there...RUN.

 

With patience, and a steady balance, this will work all game long.

 

However, sometimes you need a big chunk of yards.

 

With two safeties in halves coverage, you need to pick one, and make him make a choice. You can go vertical on either side of him, or over/under.

 

Going Vertical....

 

Sean Lee, sitting in that mid-zone, can not keep up with Reed or Davis heading down the seam. Also, get any of the 'skins faster receivers a free release (by stacking), and neither Carr nor Claiborne will be able to maintain position on a vertical route. It is then up the the safety on that side to decide where his help is going to go. He becomes RG3's read. Just watch that safety until he turns his hips, and then throw the other way. It becomes a waiting game...how long can the safety maintain his back peddle before he has to turn and run -vs- the closing rate of the WRs  -vs- the time allowed by the protection. The good thing is that neither Allen nor Church is very good at that waiting game. Both commit their hips way too early.

 

Over/Under

 

Kiffin makes his safeties always stay deep. As a result, you can run a deep route right at him to push him back, while an underneath route moves through the vacated space...in fact, you can combine two vertical routes, with a deep-in to make all sorts of space in the 10-15 yard range. His is where Moss and Hank catch most of their passes.

 

So, I believe the 'skins offense WILL move the ball on Sunday, and you will see lots of the above concepts.

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They can call it the Tampa 2 all they want but the only thing they have is the guy who has coordinated it. They don't have any players like Warren Sapp, Derrick Brooks, or John Lynch. I don't buy the run defense ranking because statiscally we were good against the run last year and the only reason was that teams knew they could throw on us easily.

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They can call it the Tampa 2 all they want but the only thing they have is the guy who has coordinated it. They don't have any players like Warren Sapp, Derrick Brooks, or John Lynch. I don't buy the run defense ranking because statiscally we were good against the run last year and the only reason was that teams knew they could throw on us easily.

You fogot ot mention Simeon Rice and Ronde Barber... they had two pro bowl safeties, we have one backup and and another coming off of ACL surgery...

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Monte Kiffin has been a failure thus far in 2013.  The defense has looked just as bad as they did in 2012, and just like predicted DeMarcus Ware is constantly banged up and slowly being broken down because of the added contact he must endure rushing as a 4-3 DE.

 

This still doesn't mean much for our individual matchup against them.  As our offense is not explosive right now and our defense is.....well you know.

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This game will tell us where this team is.  2 weeks to prepare for your division rival.  If we fall on our faces, we'll know how the rest of the season goes.

 

Rob needs to explode against this defense early and often.  I hope we can gash them, I don't like our chances if we have to dink and dunk down the field.  Holding, false starts, etc will derail us quickly.

 

Great breakdown of the defense, hopefully you emailed this to Kyle.

 

HTTR

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I've only seen the 'Girls once this year, and that was last Sunday when they mostly ran not only a cover 3, with Church the deep safety, but often had 5 DB's on the field at the expense of a LB. But that was just one game out of 5. 

 

That would be because the Broncos ran three, four, or five WR packages for most of the game, so Kiffin responded with Nickel and Dime packages running a Cover-3. Even so, the over-arching principle of keeping everyone back in conservative zones was still in-play. I really hope the 'skins don't try to re-create what the Broncos did. They aren't equipped for that.

 

The Redskins can, and should, spend a lot of time with two WRs and two TEs (really one TE and one H-Back in the Pistol). This will keep Dallas in their base Tampa-2, which can be exploited in the ways I mentioned.

 

The Over-Under, zone overload works with three or more WRs against a Cover-3 as well. The bottom line is that RG3 needs to be patient, and take what the defense is giving.

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How good are Dallas at blitzing up the middle?

 

Not very. Lee will come up the middle from time to time, but not often.

 

Here is something I've seen. Most teams try to deal with Ware during obvious passing downs by putting an extra TE or RB over there to help the LT. This is sometimes induced by him lining up in a "Wide-9" technique, where the LT isn't quick enough to get back. Since Trent has a good track record of mitigating Ware one-on-one, I would expect that Wide-9 to appear this week.

 

Once that is established, they will sometimes have Ware stunt inside. If Cory doesn't see it coming early, he won't be able to get into position, so there is your inside pressure. Its about the best you can do to move around your best player when he is a 4-3 DE.

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Greg Cossell, was on Lavar n Dukes yesterday and pretty much said the Cowboys do not run a cover-2.  They've played single high most of the year, and not just against Denver.

 

I hope this team puts Griffin in some decent passing sets, enough of these close formations with two of his options coming out of the backfield, spread em out for the love of God.

 

Kyle's play calling has been bland and unimaginative this year, I can predict about 75% of the plays.

 

Would like to see Hank and Garcon wide, Reed/Moss in the slots, and Morris in the backfield, and then allow RG3 to read defense and take what is given.

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You literally couldn't have been more wrong regarding the assignments in the base Cover 2.  Almost every position is wrong.

 

 

Also, as previously mentioned, they are running mainly the "single-high" scheme this year, which involves a "wide-9" with the safety rolled up.  It's a combination of the Tampa-2 developed by Kiffin and the schemes of Pete Carrol.  It's the main scheme that the Seahawks ran under Gus Bradley (whom I learned the Tampa-2 scheme from) last year.

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You literally couldn't have been more wrong regarding the assignments in the base Cover 2.  Almost every position is wrong.

 

 

Also, as previously mentioned, they are running mainly the "single-high" scheme this year, which involves a "wide-9" with the safety rolled up.  It's a combination of the Tampa-2 developed by Kiffin and the schemes of Pete Carrol.  It's the main scheme that the Seahawks ran under Gus Bradley (whom I learned the Tampa-2 scheme from) last year.

 

I mean, he's not THAT far off. The corners have flat responsibility typically, outside backers have hook/curl, mike has hook or in the tampa 2 deep hook/robber variation, safeties have the deep halves. As you know, because I know you know your ****, you can do a lot with that cover 2, including inverts, switches, blitz, etc.

 

The DTs don't usually two gap in a 4-3. They certainly can, but they normally don't. Especially in basic alignments...

 

And the backers usually play run first (well, they read. It doesn't take much for these guys in the NFL to make a read, so it's barely hesitation at all [which as a side note is why play action is so effective]).

 

It's not the best X's and O's piece I've seen, but he gave a great effort and took a lot of time and should commended for trying to make this site better and based on actual football and not random regurgitated ****. So while he's not entirely accurate, I give him kudos for taking the effort for making this post.

 

Although, that diagram is NOT very good, sorry airy! :P

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Greg Cossell, was on Lavar n Dukes yesterday and pretty much said the Cowboys do not run a cover-2.  They've played single high most of the year, and not just against Denver.

 

I think we need a bullhorn :)

Although, that diagram is NOT very good, sorry airy! :P

 

Tampa 2

 

tampa2.gif

 

 

Cover 2

 

cover-2-defense.png

 

Cover 2 Man:

 

Slide05.jpg

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I mean, he's not THAT far off. The corners have flat responsibility typically, outside backers have hook/curl, mike has hook or in the tampa 2 deep hook/robber variation, safeties have the deep halves. As you know, because I know you know your ****, you can do a lot with that cover 2, including inverts, switches, blitz, etc.

 

The DTs don't usually two gap in a 4-3. They certainly can, but they normally don't. Especially in basic alignments...

 

And the backers usually play run first (well, they read. It doesn't take much for these guys in the NFL to make a read, so it's barely hesitation at all [which as a side note is why play action is so effective]).

 

It's not the best X's and O's piece I've seen, but he gave a great effort and took a lot of time and should commended for trying to make this site better and based on actual football and not random regurgitated ****. So while he's not entirely accurate, I give him kudos for taking the effort for making this post.

 

Although, that diagram is NOT very good, sorry airy! :P

 

 

I probably could have said it a little better and I agree it was a good effort.  I'll give a better example below:

 

 

BASE TAMPA 2

 

DE's- Spill player.  Never a contain player unless scheme/check turns them into one.  They are all about backside pursuit (and rushing the passer), which is why this scheme prefers smaller, fast DE's.

 

DT's- One-gap penetration (Think Warren Sapp)

 

OLB's- Always run first.  They are the alley/force player who will for the most part control the outside and who DE spills to

 

MLB's- Run first.  Will drop down the midle of the field to take the deep 1/3 as long as there is a threat (look strongside first and if no threat weak.  Once no threat either way settle in).  His depth is determined by offensive play, but this role was created to solve the opening in the middle of the field behind the LB's created in the normal Cover 2.

 

S- Deep 1/2.  They play wider than the normal Cover 2, however, and can because of the role of the MLB

 

CB's-  ALWAYS take away the inside.  Depending on scheme, they can usually press and play the inside.  They want to funnel the WR out and take them to the next level with the S waiting (This was taught as essentially a double-team on the #1 to each side).  Again depending on scheme and, more importantly, threats underneath, they will carry the WR for about 10-15 yards before releasing.

 

 

 

All of this is very base but if you want to know what generic Tampa 2 is that is it.  Offensive formations can turn the WLB into the deep 1/3 player.  In the base Tampa-2 there will generally be a slant called on the strongside of the formation to take care of the running game so the MLB can be a little slower in his read so as not to get caught up in the mess, etc...

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Excellent post! To clarify for those that don't know what "spill" is... In it's most basic definition, it simply means you force the run to the perimeter and don't let it hit inside.

I loved that last post bro. Good football stuff! Let's encourage our board mates to try to post like airy did. Very happy that others are getting into the X's and O's stuff! That's real football talk!

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So I've seen mention of Ware occasionally lining up wide-9 this year. Am I right in assuming that means he would have contain responsibilities then and that the Will would then be responsible for attacking the gap between the DT and Ware (on runs)? They can still run cover 2 in this scenario, correct?

I've never been a big fan of the wide-9 (except against shotgun or deep drops) because of the gap it leaves, especially against a good running team (particularly vs a QB that can run). Is this impression accurate or am I missing something?

I'd love to add to the X's and O's KDawg, but the best I can do is ask questions unfortunately :)

Oh, and great work Masterblaster and KDawg, very informative and much appreciated!

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So I've seen mention of Ware occasionally lining up wide-9 this year. Am I right in assuming that means he would have contain responsibilities then and that the Will would then be responsible for attacking the gap between the DT and Ware (on runs)? They can still run cover 2 in this scenario, correct?

I've never been a big fan of the wide-9 (except against shotgun or deep drops) because of the gap it leaves, especially against a good running team (particularly vs a QB that can run). Is this impression accurate or am I missing something?

I'd love to add to the X's and O's KDawg, but the best I can do is ask questions unfortunately :)

Oh, and great work Masterblaster and KDawg, very informative and much appreciated!

 

Wide 9 refers to the DEs lining up outside the tackle (the 9 technique is one outside the TE - hence the name). Its mainly used on passing downs rather than as a base alignment (though Jim Washburn has used in his base - most recently when he was with the D'Line coach with the Eagles).

 

You can have the DEs responsible for contain out of the wide 9 but normally the DE is asked to get to up the field and turn the corner to get to the QB. You can play whatever coverage you like behind it - normally wide 9 teams rush 4 most of the time relying on those wide DEs to get pressure and allow them to drop 7 into coverage.

 

There are tons of variations on this though based on play call and situational checks.

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The way I've always preferred it is to have my force player the same as my flat player in zone coverages. In man, it has to be the end because it's tough to see run with your back turned to find the receiver.

Responsibilities can vary with down/distance, personnel and call as well.

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