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Yahoo News (AP)---Physicists unveil results helping explain universe


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I heart science and it does march on.  B)

 



GENEVA (AP) — After a quarter-century of searching, scientists have nailed down how one particularly rare subatomic particle decays into something else — a discovery that adds certainty to our thinking about how the universe began and keeps running.

 

The world's top particle physics lab said Friday it had measured the decay time of a particle known as a Bs (B sub s) meson into two other fundamental particles called muons, which are much heavier than but similar to electrons. It was observed as part of the reams of data coming from CERN's $10 billion Large Hadron Collider, the world's largest atom smasher, on the Swiss-French border near Geneva.

 

The rare sighting at the European Center for Nuclear Research, known by its French acronym CERN, shows that the so-called standard model of particle physics is "coming through with flying colors," though it describes only 5 percent of the universe, said Pierluigi Campana, who leads one of the two main teams at CERN involved in the research.

 

Campana called the results an important development that helps confirm the standard model, a theory developed over the past half century to explain the basic building blocks of matter.

It applies to everything from galaxies and stars to the smallest microcosms, showing how they are thought to have come into being and continue to function. The results were formally unveiled at a major physics conference in Stockholm.



 
Conference, an international team of scientists based at Japan's Proton Accelerator Research Complex announced they have documented muon neutrinos transforming into electron neutrinos — a previously unknown third way that neutrinos can spontaneously change identity. Neutrinos are subatomic particles that are very hard to detect because they have extremely low mass and rarely interact with matter.

 

That breakthrough is "a big deal," said one of the neutrino collaboration leaders, University of California at Irvine physicist Henry Sobel, because explaining the matter-antimatter asymmetry in neutrinos may shed light on why everything from tiny forms of life to stars are made of matter, but there is almost no antimatter left in the universe. That remains one of the biggest mysteries of the universe — since the Big Bang nearly 14 billion years ago should have created equal amounts of matter and antimatter.

 

 

 

And, if more interested, here's a Cern link (good site) for more basics on asymmetry, matter, and antimatter etc. re: "big bang."

 

http://home.web.cern.ch/about/physics/search-antimatter

 

 

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It's too bad we don't have our own collider and run experiments as well.

yeah, we do have a very expensive hole in the ground though
Yes we do.  It's called Texas.
bitter much?
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  • 2 weeks later...

Has LHCb spotted physics beyond the Standard Model?

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2013/aug/02/has-lhcb-spotted-physics-beyond-the-standard-model

An analysis of data from the LHCb experiment at the CERN particle-physics lab suggests that the B-meson could decay in a way not predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, according to theoretical physicists in Spain and France. The researchers believe that the deviation from the Standard Model has been measured with a confidence of 4.5σ – which is approaching the gold standard of 5σ required for a discovery in particle physics.

One of seven experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the LHCb experiment focuses on the physics of B-mesons – those particles containing the bottom (or beauty) quark – produced during proton collisions. One process of great interest is the decay of a B-meson into a kaon (K*) and two muons: B → K*μ+μ–. This is a relatively rare decay and according to the Standard Model it occurs only because of the subtle effects of heavier particles – W and Z bosons – that mediate the weak force. As a result, particles that are not described by the Standard Model may be contributing to the decay and so their effects could be measured by LHCb. Evidence that this decay happens in a manner that the Standard Model cannot explain could point the way to "new physics".

Now, Sébastien Descotes-Genon of the University of Paris together with Joaquim Matias and Javier Virto of the Autonomous University of Barcelona have carefully studied the LHCb data associated with this decay and believe that the results are not as predicted by the Standard Model.

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Has LHCb spotted physics beyond the Standard Model?

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2013/aug/02/has-lhcb-spotted-physics-beyond-the-standard-model

An analysis of data from the LHCb experiment at the CERN particle-physics lab suggests that the B-meson could decay in a way not predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, according to theoretical physicists in Spain and France. The researchers believe that the deviation from the Standard Model has been measured with a confidence of 4.5σ – which is approaching the gold standard of 5σ required for a discovery in particle physics.

One of seven experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the LHCb experiment focuses on the physics of B-mesons – those particles containing the bottom (or beauty) quark – produced during proton collisions. One process of great interest is the decay of a B-meson into a kaon (K*) and two muons: B → K*μ+μ–. This is a relatively rare decay and according to the Standard Model it occurs only because of the subtle effects of heavier particles – W and Z bosons – that mediate the weak force. As a result, particles that are not described by the Standard Model may be contributing to the decay and so their effects could be measured by LHCb. Evidence that this decay happens in a manner that the Standard Model cannot explain could point the way to "new physics".

Now, Sébastien Descotes-Genon of the University of Paris together with Joaquim Matias and Javier Virto of the Autonomous University of Barcelona have carefully studied the LHCb data associated with this decay and believe that the results are not as predicted by the Standard Model.

 

Who knew 5 the artist formerly known as Prince was the gold standard in particle physics.

 

Game blouses.

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