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CNN.com: Adobe abandons mobile Flash development, report says


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http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/09/tech/mobile/adobe-mobile-flash-wired/index.html

In an abrupt about-face in its mobile software strategy, Adobe will soon cease developing its Flash Player plug-in for mobile browsers, according to an e-mail sent to Adobe partners on Tuesday evening.

And with that e-mail flash, Adobe has signaled that it knows, as Steve Jobs predicted, the end of the Flash era on the web is coming soon.

The e-mail, obtained and first reported on by ZDNet, says that Adobe will no longer continue to "adapt Flash Player for mobile devices to new browser, OS version or device configurations," instead focusing on alternative application packaging programs and the HTML5 protocol.

"Our future work with Flash on mobile devices will be focused on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all the major app stores," the quoted e-mail says.

In the past, Adobe has released software tools for mobile developers that create a single platform programmers can use to make applications that work across three major mobile platforms: Android, iOS and the BlackBerry OS. While it's seemingly easier than learning all of the native languages for each operating system, some developers have claimed a loss in app performance when coding in a non-native language that then gets translated into other languages.

The move indicates a massive backpedaling on Adobe's part, a company who championed its Flash platform in the face of years of naysaying about its use on mobile devices. Despite Flash's near ubiquity across desktop PCs, many in the greater computing industry, including, famously, Apple Computer, have denounced the platform as fundamentally unstable on mobile browsers, and an intense battery drain. In effect, Flash's drawbacks outweigh the benefits on mobile devices.

Flash became a dominant desktop platform by allowing developers to code interactive games, create animated advertisements and deliver video to any browser that had the plugin installed, without having to take into account the particulars of any given browser. However, with the development of Javascript, CSS, and HTML5, which has native support for video, many web developers are turning away from Flash, which can be a resource hog even on the most advanced browsers.

Apple made its biggest waves in the case against Flash in April of last year, when Steve Jobs penned a 1,500-word screed against the controversial platform, describing it as a technology of the past. Jobs and Apple disliked the platform so intensely, it has since been barred from use on all iOS devices.

Despite attempts to breathe life into Flash on other mobile devices -- namely, Android and BlackBerry OS -- Adobe has failed to deliver a consistently stable version of the platform on a smartphone or tablet. In WIRED's testing of the BlackBerry PlayBook in April, Flash use caused the browser to crash on a consistent basis. And when Flash was supposed to come to tablets with Motorola's Xoom, Adobe was only able to provide an highly unstable Beta version of Flash to ship with the flagship Android device.

"Adobe has lost so much credibility with the community that I'm hoping they are bought by someone else that can bring some stability and eventually some credibility back to the Flash Platform," wrote software developer Dan Florio in a blog post on Wednesday morning.

The drastic reversal in Adobe's mobile plans comes in the wake of the company cutting 750 jobs on Tuesday, a move prompted by what Adobe labeled "corporate restructuring."

An Adobe representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Well it looks like Steve Jobs and Apple were right, yet again. Adobe thought it had a cash cow when they acquired Macromedia, and in-turn Flash, however Flash was quickly losing favor in the design community even back then. Adobe tried to reinvent Flash by making it more intuitive, but it was too little too late and Adobe in the past few years was just trying to delay the inevitable. It's only a matter of time until Flash is dead, and with HTML5 on the horizon that time is fast approaching. Apple merely toned the death knell for Flash that most developers and designers had been waiting for. This is just another sign of the end of Flash.

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What is replacing it?

And how is that better?

HTML5, Javascript and CSS/CSS3 are leading the way in Web these days. HTML5 is really the biggest component to the change; it will allow you to embed video, audio and even animation features without the need for a plugin. Flash's biggest drawback is that it is plugin-based meaning you have to have the software (separate from your browser) on your device in order to experience the content. So the fact that a developer/designer can provide content that is readable on most devices without the need for external software cuts down the possibility for incompatibility issues, bugs, security exploits and performance drains to affect your browser/devices. So those are the big advantages.

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Good, the quicker Flash is killed in favor of HTML5, the better. Plugins are a burden. I remember when it was cool to have Shockwave so you could play games at school. Was it Macromedia?

Yeah it was Macromedia Flash and Shockwave.

I remember when Adobe bought Macromedia around 2007 or 08 I think(correct me if I am wrong). But you can use jQuery as well to do the animations that you need. Flash is a file hog and memory intensive. When I developed in it, I used more ActionScript if I had a Flash project to do. Also YouTube I think is already using the HTML5 standards. This will be the end of Flash.

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Yeah it was Macromedia Flash and Shockwave.

I remember when Adobe bought Macromedia around 2007 or 08 I think(correct me if I am wrong). But you can use jQuery as well to do the animations that you need. Flash is a file hog and memory intensive. When I developed in it, I used more ActionScript if I had a Flash project to do. Also YouTube I think is already using the HTML5 standards. This will be the end of Flash.

Macromedia's MX suite (Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks) was out in 2004 and Adobe swooped in to buy them out about a year/year and a half later.

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Macromedia's MX suite (Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks) was out in 2004 and Adobe swooped in to buy them out about a year/year and a half later.

You're right. It was around 2006, because it was Macromedia Flash 8, and the year afterwards Adobe introduced all of Macromedia software in their collections. I wonder how some of my Android friends feel about this.

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HTML5, Javascript and CSS/CSS3 are leading the way in Web these days. HTML5 is really the biggest component to the change; it will allow you to embed video, audio and even animation features without the need for a plugin. Flash's biggest drawback is that it is plugin-based meaning you have to have the software (separate from your browser) on your device in order to experience the content. So the fact that a developer/designer can provide content that is readable on most devices without the need for external software cuts down the possibility for incompatibility issues, bugs, security exploits and performance drains to affect your browser/devices. So those are the big advantages.

Ok, what I understood was, some programming scripts without the need for an additional plug in makes web pages easier, safer and more universally accessed.

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