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NC: The largest cities in China Sink


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The largest cities in China Sinks

China faces many resource and environmental problems of rapid growth. One of the most important is the problem of water, the water consumption needs of their cities and huge imbalance between north and south dry wet.

The extraction of groundwater has created major problems in most major cities of China. The scale of extraction has been such as to coastal cities such as Tianjin, Hebei and Shandong, and Shanghai has been the most important sal****er intrusion. This is a serious problem in some countries has led to contamination of fresh groundwater and even the inability to irrigate crops.

But there is an even more fundamental cause, the very stability of the ground where the cities stand.

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Meh. Amateurs. As always, the Chinese specialise in cheap knockoffs of other people's work.

Now THIS is a sinkhole.

Well if China keeps it up maybe theirs will connect to that one at some point. Just think of it, the first trans-Earth tunnel.

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There is no scenario where the Capital City is not under sand in 4 years. Not 400, Not 40....FOUR.

Every water policy is backwards, every environmental task is wrong, They have to move south.. Good luck with that!

Few people think of China as a desert nation, yet it is among the world's largest. More than 27%, or 2.5 million square kilometers, of the country comprises useless sand (just 7% of Chinese land feeds about a quarter of the world's population). A Ministry of Science and Technology task force says desertification costs China about $2-3 billion annually, while 800 km of railway and thousands of kilometers of roads are blocked by sedimentation. An estimated 110 million people suffer firsthand from the impacts of desertification and, by official reports, another 2,500 sq km turns to desert each year.

This is nothing new, of course. In the 4th century B.C. Chinese philosopher Mencius (Mengzi) wrote about desertification and its human causes, including tree-cutting and overgrazing. Experts argue over the reasons and consequences, but all agree that Chinese deserts are on the move. Sand from the distant Gobi threatens even Beijing, which some scientists say could be silted over within a few years. Dunes forming just 70 km from the capital may be drifting south at 20-25 km a year. Conservative estimates say 3 km a year. And despite massive spending on land reclamation and replanting, China is falling behind.

Of the forests established, researchers point out many problems, including single-species forestry. In Ningxia, for example, 70 percent of the trees planted were poplar and willow. In 2000, one billion poplar trees were lost to a disease (Anoplophora), wiping out 20 years of planting efforts. The vulnerability to disease, compounded with its rapid exhaustion of soil and water resources, makes single-species forests “green deserts,” according to agro-botanist Zhang Yan. Single-species forestry helps increase the official tally of trees, but it fails to improve the environment.

Only 15% of the over-exaggerated plantings have survived since 1949.

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Where do I end up if I dig straight down?

http://www.ubasics.com/dighole/

Looks like Hawaii, an itsy-bitsy sliver of northern Montana, and the extreme northern coast of Alaska are the only places located opposite of land. Start anywhere else in the US and you end up in either the Indian or Southern Ocean. Even Guam ends up sticking you hundreds of miles off the eastern coast of South America.

Interestingly, starting in extreme northern Alaska drops you in Antarctica.

Pretty cool -- didn't know that.

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Looks like Hawaii, an itsy-bitsy sliver of northern Montana, and the extreme northern coast of Alaska are the only places located opposite of land. Start anywhere else in the US and you end up in either the Indian or Southern Ocean. Even Guam ends up sticking you hundreds of miles off the eastern coast of South America.

Interestingly, starting in extreme northern Alaska drops you in Antarctica.

Pretty cool -- didn't know that.

Looks like Chile and Peru will end you up in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia. Indonesia to Brazil.

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