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HP: Obama On $1.2 Billion Black Farmers Settlement: 'Brings Us Closer To The Ideals Of Freedom and Equality'


BRAVEONAWARPATH

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Click on the link to read the rest.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/28/obama-on-12-billion-black_n_1064582.html

President Barack Obama called a judge's approval of a $1.2 billion government settlement with black farmers who for decades had been denied loans and assistance from the Agriculture Department, a step forward in "addressing an unfortunate chapter in USDA's civil rights history."

This is the second round of settlements in a case filed in 1997, which alleged that thousands of black farmers had been discriminated against between 1983 and 1997. This round is directed at farmers who were not awarded payment because of missed filing deadlines. The judge said payments would likely be dispersed in a year or so, after neutral parties reviewed the individual claims.

"This agreement will provide overdue relief and justice to African American farmers, and bring us closer to the ideals of freedom and equality that this country was founded on," Obama said in a statement.

"So many farmers had given up hope that this would ever come to pass," said John Boyd, the head of the National Black Farmers Association, according to CNN. "It's gonna take about a year to run all the farmers through the system. Each case will have to be looked at in a forum that's also looked at by the court. Once the cases are checked, then the farmers start to get their money."

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lol @ twa. Will anyone take the bait? =p

Seriously though, I have no clue as to the facts of the case. I'm assuming there was widespread documented proof that these farmers were denied for no other reason for this kind of settlement. Anyone have the facts on this? (I'm far too lazy to go researching this..)

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My understanding is that there was a discriminatory practice of who got the grants and loans IE if you were white ya did and if you were black ya didn't in many, many cases.

Yeah, maybe I didn't read carefully enough, but it seemed like the article did a poor job explaining of what actually happened to the farmers in the 80s and 90s.

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Yeah, maybe I didn't read carefully enough, but it seemed like the article did a poor job explaining of what actually happened to the farmers in the 80s and 90s.

Don't blame you. Seems like we would have been past things like that happening in the 80's and 90's. Sadly, every age has its share of stupid people.

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Yeah, maybe I didn't read carefully enough, but it seemed like the article did a poor job explaining of what actually happened to the farmers in the 80s and 90s.

These types of articles seem to assume that the readers are fully aware of the main issue, so an update on the topic is all that is needed. I find myself having to hunt down old articles on google constantly lol...

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The question I always have on issues like this is How did the USDA know these farmers/applicants were black?

Was there a race box on a form to check?

Was each applicant interviewed?

Fair question. there might have been. I know there are race boxes on a lot of gov't forms. Not sure though. I do remember a story or three about application bias when the people came in person... not sure if this is related.

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The question I always have on issues like this is How did the USDA know these farmers/applicants were black?

Was there a race box on a form to check?

Was each applicant interviewed?

We need a good link to a comprehensive explanation of this story. One would hope that in a monetary settlement case, there would have been some good reason like overt discrimination like an in-person interview. But you never know. There are plenty of cases where, if the results aren't equal, it is by DOJ definition, racist.

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The question I always have on issues like this is How did the USDA know these farmers/applicants were black?

Was there a race box on a form to check?

I don't know, but just one more reason for me to despise forms that require us to check a box as to our color!!!

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The question I always have on issues like this is How did the USDA know these farmers/applicants were black?

Was there a race box on a form to check?

Was each applicant interviewed?

More than likely the government kept track of minority-owned farms in one manner or another. Not to mention that in the past when applying for a loan or assistance from the government, it was normal to do so in person.

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When I went to culinary school and lost my loan assistance because the $13,000 I made that year was so much more than the $9,000 I made the year before and was offered assistance because I was the legal limit to receive a Native American loan and refused it, because it didn't seem fair, I guess I was wrong and should have just taken my handout.

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This is why we need to focus on actually thinking about how Government Policies should be implemented and policed. We are great at giving money out but a huge amount of it goes towards projects or people that should never be qualified for the funding.

This whole situation is a case study in that kind of thing. There may have been discrimination against Black Farmers, I don't know. However, I do know this. There were more black farmers who filed and received funding then there were Black Farmers in this Country according to Census figures. To me, this is another in a long line of cases where unscrupulous lawyers and individuals came together to game the system. The whole Sherrod involvement in this thing and the fact that she was employed by the USDA and the involvement of her family and the fact that they benefited from this whole thing only makes it more of a cluster.

We just need to stop handing out money with no clear or effective means of policing those funds or even managing them. It's stupid. I have no beef with doing the right thing but at this point, we have no way of even telling what the right thing is. The result seems to be things like this.

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I don't know, but just one more reason for me to despise forms that require us to check a box as to our color!!!
Why is this a reason for you to despise these forms?

I agree with Isle.

The form has no color, and when the box is checked, it can give a racist in the agency an opportunity to make a judgment based on that.

If we are all to be equal, there's a really easy place we can start,, make everyone a faceless applicant with only name and qualifications on the form to show the decision makers who the applicant is and what they can do.

~Bang

---------- Post added October-30th-2011 at 03:11 PM ----------

This is why we need to focus on actually thinking about how Government Policies should be implemented and policed. We are great at giving money out but a huge amount of it goes towards projects or people that should never be qualified for the funding.

This whole situation is a case study in that kind of thing. There may have been discrimination against Black Farmers, I don't know. However, I do know this. There were more black farmers who filed and received funding then there were Black Farmers in this Country according to Census figures. To me, this is another in a long line of cases where unscrupulous lawyers and individuals came together to game the system. The whole Sherrod involvement in this thing and the fact that she was employed by the USDA and the involvement of her family and the fact that they benefited from this whole thing only makes it more of a cluster.

We just need to stop handing out money with no clear or effective means of policing those funds or even managing them. It's stupid. I have no beef with doing the right thing but at this point, we have no way of even telling what the right thing is. The result seems to be things like this.

I would also add on top that people found guilty of collusion, nepotism, cronyism and other assorted good ol' boy networking be punished SEVERELY.

Make harsh examples out of them.

As it is there's not much to fear if caught right now.

~Bang

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This is why we need to focus on actually thinking about how Government Policies should be implemented and policed. We are great at giving money out but a huge amount of it goes towards projects or people that should never be qualified for the funding.

This whole situation is a case study in that kind of thing. There may have been discrimination against Black Farmers, I don't know. However, I do know this. There were more black farmers who filed and received funding then there were Black Farmers in this Country according to Census figures. To me, this is another in a long line of cases where unscrupulous lawyers and individuals came together to game the system. The whole Sherrod involvement in this thing and the fact that she was employed by the USDA and the involvement of her family and the fact that they benefited from this whole thing only makes it more of a cluster.

We just need to stop handing out money with no clear or effective means of policing those funds or even managing them. It's stupid. I have no beef with doing the right thing but at this point, we have no way of even telling what the right thing is. The result seems to be things like this.

Yeah, I read about this case a while back and the gist was that people were wronged, but that a ton of people would receive payments simply because they were black farmers. Many weren't even from the same geographic area.

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  • 2 weeks later...
US?...is he a closet racist? :)

Only his Black half since Blacks are the only racists these days. :pfft:

I'm also too lazy to look it up but as I remember it, the problem wasn't caused by higher ups at thr Feds not approving applications based on the race indicated. Rather, the problem was that individuals at the local farm bureaus (or wherever they'd go to apply) routinely denied them farm loans or discarded or otherwise compromised their applications. Therefore I guess it was an issue of a lack of oversight at the Federal level.

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Yeah, I read about this case a while back and the gist was that people were wronged, but that a ton of people would receive payments simply because they were black farmers. Many weren't even from the same geographic area.
How would you resolve this? It's almost impossible to compensate the wronged without some excess, or else leaving many deserving out in the cold. I'm good with some excess compensation - within reason - instead of the alternative.
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