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So I was just listening to 106.7 and they were having a discussion on Chairman Josef Stern and how much of a dick he is. The NBA dress code came up and there were lots of differing opinions from the callers. I personally think it's the one thing Chairman Stern has gotten right but I'm wondering how others on here feel. So please, poll away.

For those who don't know:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBA_dress_code

On October 17, 2005, National Basketball Association commissioner David Stern implemented a mandatory dress code for all NBA and NBA Development League players. This was especially noteworthy because the NBA became the first major professional sports league to implement such a rule, although National Hockey League rules state that a player is supposed to wear a jacket and tie to games and on charters if not told otherwise by the head coach or general manager.

Details of the dress code

Stern's dress code stated that all players must dress in business or conservative attire while arriving and departing during a scheduled game, on the bench while injured, and when conducting official NBA business (press interviews, charity events, etc.) The new dress code banned fashions most often associated with hip-hop culture, specifically: Hardwood Classics jerseys (or any other jersey), jeans, hats, do-rags, t-shirts, large jewelry, sneakers and Timberland style boots. This particular clothing is not allowed to be worn by players to interviews, games (on and off the bench), charity events, or any other occasion affiliated with the NBA or the NBDL. Violators of the dress code are fined and may be suspended with repeat offenses. The dress code was developed with the intention of combating image problems that have plagued the NBA in recent history.

Under current NBA dress regulations, if a player does not dress to participate in a game, he must dress in a manner suitable for a coach. In the NBA, a suit or a sport coat is required for coaches, but a necktie is not required.

More at the link

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http://thehoopdoctors.com/online2/2010/10/the-nba-dress-code-five-years-later/

The NBA Dress Code, Five Years Later

October 19, 2010 – Kevin Burke

Believe it or not, it’s been exactly five years since the NBA announced that there would be a dress code which, at the time, caused much discussion, reaction and ill feelings alike. David Stern is no stranger to enacting initiatives when he thinks it will benefit his product and make it more appealing. He did it with the “One and Done” Rule as well as stating that the league will be playing meaningful, regular season games overseas. But this was a bit different. The reaction to the dress code wasn’t of the typical variety for a myriad of reasons. But five years later, was it a success or a failure? Was it truly racist afterall?

When we first heard that there would be a dress code in the NBA, many didn’t know how to react to it. Myself included. It came somewhat by surprise because when you look at other sports leagues in the U.S., there isn’t such a thing. Inactive baseball players appear in the dugout in uniform and football players who are not suited up are usually in warm-up type attire issued by the team. But basketball players had free license to come however they wanted. This “come as you are” mentality apparently didn’t appeal to David Stern, so he felt that a dress code was necessary.

When the announcement came that there would be a league wide dress code imposed, it was met with mixed reactions amongst NBA players. You had certain guys in the league applaud the new rule, saying that it was in the league’s best interest to clean it up a bit.

Five years ago Grant Hill said, “I like to dress up. When I first came into the league, it was like guys were competing in fashion. I think it’s good. Some guys are going to complain, but I understand it.” Shawn Marion also added, “If they’re trying to change the image of the league, that’s cool.”

Then you had guys who were less than thrilled by it. At the time, Allen Iverson said “I think it’s wrong. You shouldn’t judge a person from what they wear.” Andrei Kirelinko added “I don’t think it’s quite comfortable…”

Some even went so far as to hint towards racism. Those that felt that way did so largely because a certain section of the dress code specifically outlaws “Chains, pendants, or medallions worn over the player’s clothes”, which were mainly worn by some of the black players in the league. I see things differently now than I did five years ago, and at the time, I thought that part of the rule was a bit questionable because of the aforementioned reason. But as time went on, I realized that in a league where roughly 3 out of every 4 players is black, it’s tough not to have pieces of the rule that scream racism whether it’s justified or not. I eventually looked at that as Stern reminding them that they’re at work, although that part of the rule clearly spoke specifically to a certain group of players.

What had to be kept into perspective throughout this whole ordeal is why David Stern found the dress code to be necessary in the first place. It was the post-Michael Jordan era, which was led by Allen Iverson, the NBAs biggest trendsetter of all-time. Considering all of Iverson’s greatness, what I applaud him most for was just being himself. Allen didn’t conform to anything. He didn’t change one bit from how he grew up in Hampton, Virginia (that can be looked at as both good and bad). Before long, Iverson’s image swept through the league and the Association didn’t resemble itself from just a decade previous.

Then, of course, came Ron Artest on November 19, 2004. Malice in the Palace. Naturally, I’m speaking of the fight at the Palace of Auburn Hills, between certain members of Artest’s Pacers, some members of the Detroit Pistons, and some Pistons fans. If there was ever something that a league didn’t need, it was the NBA and this. My feelings on the incident aside, the timing of this couldn’t have been worse for the league. It would have been impossible to image a worse scenario.

Basketball was already plummeting rapidly from the good graces of mainstream media prior to this incident. This was the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back. In the years leading up to the fight in Auburn Hills, I can’t even tell you the number of sports fans that I spoke to that would practically boast about how they don’t really follow the NBA anymore. It was almost as if you were less of a person if you did and I found myself continuously defending the league as if I earned a check to do so. Naturally, that number only grew after this fight and because of the amount of coverage that it received.

This left David Stern looking for anything that could help in turning around the face of the league, because I truly feel that in the 64-year history of the league, November 19, 2004 was the darkest day. It’s no coincidence that the dress code came the following off season. Was this something that Stern planned to do ahead of time? Personally, I don’t know. But even if it was, this expedited the process. Stern even went so far as to ban Dwyane Wade from wearing a personalized band-aid.

I’ve said it before, Stern is the consummate business man and his sole objective is to improve his product, no matter the cost. Realizing that people scoffed at the NBA, he did what he saw fit. What I admire about Stern is that he truly doesn’t care what people think about his rules. He’s not trying to make friends. He’s trying to make money, and he felt as if the image of his league was impeding his ability to do the latter. At first, the Iverson-influenced image of the league was a novelty and made Stern money. But then it proved to be a hindrance and that’s when moves were made. Stern is a very sharp guy, so he had to have known what type of reaction that this was going to garner, but again, he isn’t concerned with how it is received. He even went so far as to say:

“If they are really going to have a problem, they will have to make a decision about how they want to spend their adult life in terms of playing in the NBA or not.”

The league and proponents of the new rule tried to deflect the attention away from perceived racism by pointing out the fact that Steven Nash and Dirk Nowitzki needed to clean it up as well. I concede that Nowitzki routinely looked like he just rolled out of bed and Nash often times resembled a failed guitarist. Gradually, the aspect of racism faded away as time went on.

For some teams, such as the Knicks, it didn’t really matter because they already had their own team enforced dress code, which is why you always saw their players in suits. But for others, of course, it was an adjustment.

Fast forward five years, to today. I still think of the dress code every time I see guys on the sidelines with suits on. But did it help the image and perception of the league? Are those who used to brag about not being a fan of the NBA now interested in what’s going on? I do think that the perception of the NBA has progressed in the last five years, but still has a long way to go. In the early 90s, you could argue that it was the league with the most popularity, or at least it was somewhere near the top of the list. Stern wanted his league to get back to where it once was.

I can say with a level of certainty that the league is in a better place now than it was five years ago. That is inarguable. But you could point to a bunch of reasons to help explain that. Two Lakers vs. Celtics Finals matchups in the last handful of years surely helped. The dress code didn’t hurt the league, and I’m sure it did play a role in boosting the improved perception of the league. To what extent is anyone’s guess, and looking back five years later, I can honestly say it was a good thing.

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Yep, this is a fact.

And another fact seems to be that the NBAs image problem has been getting better.

~Bang

It's a shame more people aren't tuning back into the league. It's really at its height talent wise. The amount of quality players now in the league is just absurd. Great, great basketball. (And now they're ****ing up the moment with this damn lockout, ugh.)

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I voted disapprove, but I thought it was it regards to the on the court dress code, like headbands and socks and dumb **** no one cares about. In regards to what you were actually talking about, I agree with it. Be a professional, act and look like one. End of story.

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Don't think there's really on the court dress code. I'm sure something in the NCAA, but not in the NBA that I can recall.

But yeah, as probably everyone here, I have a dress code at work. Not a big deal. I actually enjoy it. The whole AI "thug" image is dying but if anyone wants to know why it's still necessary, see Young, Nick.

ny1.jpg

That's tame. And you better believe that clown--God bless him, I still love him--would be rocking **** like that on the bench if he could.

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Most businesses have dress codes because all it takes is only dude coming to work looking like this.

footballcutoff.jpg

Seriously, I see some of these players showing up for negotiations and the 1st thing I noticed was how they were dressed. When working in offices, I hate wearing suits, and corp casual is just boring. But you know these guys own more adult clothes. They wear them to events all the time. It doesn't have to be a boring corporate thing...but show some respect for the process.

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Fine by me. It will give them a chance to show off their $5,000 diamond-studded gators and custom-tailored 3-piece Armani suits.

On a somewhat related note, I think the players should wear 70s style basketball shorts whenever they wear throwback jerseys. You know, to complete the retro look. God that would be funny.

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It's a shame more people aren't tuning back into the league. It's really at its height talent wise. The amount of quality players now in the league is just absurd. Great, great basketball. (And now they're ****ing up the moment with this damn lockout, ugh.)

A lockout will devastate the NBA just like the NHL which was at a talent-high with all the European imports and American youth programs developing top players. The reality is, a deal is probably not coming in time. Sucks because I want another Dallas vs. OKC WCF. Enough of the same six teams rotating. It WILL be interesting to see what ESPN will replace basketball with, especially all the generic dunks in the SC Top 10.

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I agree they should have a dress code just as every other pro league should. Even my middle school soccer team had a dress code for game days because how you look goes a long way towards making a good impression on people, and taking the time to dress professionally shows that you are serious about your job.

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I agree they should have a dress code just as every other pro league should. Even my middle school soccer team had a dress code for game days because how you look goes a long way towards making a good impression on people, and taking the time to dress professionally shows that you are serious about your job.

Now we're being told that we can't make the students dress up for games, for Varsity. Well, we can tell them to, but if they don't, we can't bench them or punish them. This political correctness is getting old. Some of the kids can't afford really nice dress clothes, and we understand that, but at least try. We have kids, when they're supposed to dress up, come in jeans that allow their underwear to show and t-shirts with slogans on them. It's ridiculous and we're not allowed to do anything about it other than talk to them and explain why dressing up matters. A conversation which they ignore.

I agree 100%. Dress for success.

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Now we're being told that we can't make the students dress up for games, for Varsity. Well, we can tell them to, but if they don't, we can't bench them or punish them. This political correctness is getting old. Some of the kids can't afford really nice dress clothes, and we understand that, but at least try. We have kids, when they're supposed to dress up, come in jeans that allow their underwear to show and t-shirts with slogans on them. It's ridiculous and we're not allowed to do anything about it other than talk to them and explain why dressing up matters. A conversation which they ignore.

I agree 100%. Dress for success.

Yea that's pretty bad. I think most of our high school teams had the choice to vote each week whether they'd dress up or wear their jerseys on game day. They usually dressed up.

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Yea that's pretty bad. I think most of our high school teams had the choice to vote each week whether they'd dress up or wear their jerseys on game day. They usually dressed up.

We even try just having them wear their jerseys with dress pants/nice jeans and dress shoes/nice sneakers. Nope. :ols: Oh well, gotta keep trying.

I want to look into warm ups for next year that they buy. It's not dressing up, but we could probably get a nice warm up suit for $35-40. They can all wear them and look uniform, at the very least.

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Now we're being told that we can't make the students dress up for games, for Varsity. Well, we can tell them to, but if they don't, we can't bench them or punish them. This political correctness is getting old. Some of the kids can't afford really nice dress clothes, and we understand that, but at least try. We have kids, when they're supposed to dress up, come in jeans that allow their underwear to show and t-shirts with slogans on them. It's ridiculous and we're not allowed to do anything about it other than talk to them and explain why dressing up matters. A conversation which they ignore.

I agree 100%. Dress for success.

When I was in High School our varsity basketball team was given burgundy blazers and black ties as part of their uniforms, they wore them to the games and from the games.

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I voted against it.

I have a dress code at work. Tie everyday. Hell, I even wear ties on "casual fridays." I certainly see the merit in it, and agree with the statement that you should dress as a professional in the work place - something that virtually ALL of you have referenced. In both High School and College I wore dress clothes before my various sporting events. That's the way it SHOULD be. Should is the key word.

With all of that said, I think the NBA's dress code is a joke. First and foremost, it has NOT succeeded in it's original goal of eliminating the "thug" look of the NBA. Sure, players no longer look like AI after games (like GACOLB said). But this perceived change is really superficial and only skin deep. I think Stern wanted to change the culture of the NBA, and thought that changing the dress code would begin doing that. He has proven to be wrong on that one. NBA is still full of morons who willingly (and often enthusiastically) promote stereotypes (and for the record, I'm colored). They wear professional clothes (and even then it's debatable . . . something I'll discuss later) before and after games, but still dress and act like idiots every other chance they get.

My second reason is related to the culture change. This lockout has justified my stance that NBA players will continue to be jackasses for the most part. KG can dress in as many sweaters with dress shirts underneath as he wants . . . but when you get up and start screaming in negotiations, you are an idiot. Wade can wear glasses and bowties all he wants . . . but hasn't changed the fact that he thought it would be best to "stand up for himself" after apparently being "disrespected" by Stern. What I am ultimately getting at in all of this is that the change in clothes has NOT improved the conduct of NBA players. It annoys me to see such a farce. Players think that they suddenly are more professional by dressing the way they do now . . . yet they turn around and still act like idiots (for the most part).

And my last gripe (and most important) gripe is as follows: Players are taking far too many liberties with the dress code. Wear a simple suit and tie. Now . . . we have seen the rise of THE NERD LOOK!!!! My most HATED of all looks (well . . . it's close with the pop collar). Seriously, when did it become cool for everybody to wear fake glasses, bowties, plaid (sp?) shirts, etc.? I WANT TO SEE THE END OF THE NERD LOOK. Once NBA players stop dressing this way, kids will no longer do it. DEATH TO THE NERD LOOK! (which is an extension of the dress code).

In all honesty, the dress code is a good thing in theory. I fully believe that. But come on. It hasn't accomplished its original goals. It's a sham. And worst of all, it has created a monster. Let the players wear what they want . . . at least we won't see 7 footers dressed like Urkel (Dwight Howard) and fake bandaids under fake glasses (Wade).

This is coming from a guy that LOVES the NBA. Moreover, it is coming from a guy who thinks that every player should just take responsibility for how he presents himself. Guys like Derek Fisher, Chauncey Billups, etc. dressed professionally before the dress code was adopted. Younger players should just follow suit.

Ok. I'm ready to be chased with fire and pitchforks now.

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Now we're being told that we can't make the students dress up for games, for Varsity. Well, we can tell them to, but if they don't, we can't bench them or punish them. This political correctness is getting old. Some of the kids can't afford really nice dress clothes, and we understand that, but at least try. We have kids, when they're supposed to dress up, come in jeans that allow their underwear to show and t-shirts with slogans on them. It's ridiculous and we're not allowed to do anything about it other than talk to them and explain why dressing up matters. A conversation which they ignore.

I agree 100%. Dress for success.

If you can't afford em, go to Goodwill. If you can't go to Goodwill, find a drunk, and trade him for his.

-Coach Boone

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If you can't afford em, go to Goodwill. If you can't go to Goodwill, find a drunk, and trade him for his.

-Coach Boone

Stick, our guys are not humble. They will not wear Goodwill clothing, or a drunks clothing. They have entirely too much pride. Don't get me wrong, I love our guys, but they are a difficult bunch to deal with. I'm sure there's a solution. We just need to find it.

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Stick, our guys are not humble. They will not wear Goodwill clothing, or a drunks clothing. They have entirely too much pride. Don't get me wrong, I love our guys, but they are a difficult bunch to deal with. I'm sure there's a solution. We just need to find it.

I mean, I just wanted to quote Remember the Titans.

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