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What is with the all out blitzes,even with Rams on their own 10Yd. line?


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With the Rams knocking on the door to score,even the commentator took out his illustrator pen and circled the nobody back here areas in the end zone before they scored a touchdown.

Was this another full dog blitz? Wouldn't it seem appropriate to leave at least two men home to cover? What is with this guy?

Also,why can't Rex hold the ball with two hands when in the pocket? I would think that would be quarterback 101. This guy has to watch some tape of Cam Newton. He double clutches that ball so well , it's impressive for a rook.

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To be fair inside the redzone or just outside is typically an area where defenses do get more aggressive - as you try to force a bad throw for a turnover or get a sack to knock the offense out of FG range. I'd rather see a zero blitz in that area than say, just picking a situation at random, with the offense backed up cose to its own 20 at 3rd and 21 when we have the lead late in the 4th quarter.

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Here is a universal constant for the game of football.

Offense innovates.

Defense adapts.

Offense must innovate again.

This is the essence of football, which at it's core is a defensive game. The NFL has constantly added and adjusted rules to give the offense an edge, and every time they do, defense adapts, and offense must again get new rules to protect it.

Every major offensive philosophy that you can think of has been eventually obliterated by defenses figuring it out and rendering it obsolete.

Currently offensive philosophy is an attacking wide open passing game, (which innovated to defeat the cover-2, which did a great job in knocking out the last wave of pass happy offensive innovation)

And so defense adapts. Offense wants to throw the ball all over the place? The NFL sets it up so defense can't disrupt receiver's routes or hit them?. The obvious answer is to cut off the threat at it's source, namely the quarterback.

Pressure beats the passing attack. Since the rules favor the receivers, focus on giving the QB less time to do his job.

I think the Redskins are doing a great job of this, and that opens up the ability to be deceptive, which we certainly are when we show 8 men on the line. Are they coming? Are they stunting? who is backing off into coverage? Which way will they waggle?

The very threat being represented is giving the opposing QB fits with pre-snap adjustments.

~Bang

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Remember the Eagles defense from a few year back? Gave up a hell of a lot of yards but killed you with all out blitzes in the same situation. The call wasn't bad, but the Bradford knew the blitz was coming and who would be open and possibly the receiver saw it and adjusted to the route that Bradford knew would be open . What tipped Bradford off needs to be looked at. Was it bad design or just bad pre snap execution?

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With the Rams knocking on the door to score,even the commentator took out his illustrator pen and circled the nobody back here areas in the end zone before they scored a touchdown.

Was this another full dog blitz? Wouldn't it seem appropriate to leave at least two men home to cover? What is with this guy?

In addition to what's already been said, you can't evaluate play-calling on a snapshot basis. Games are long, and coaches will use a play early to set up the success of other plays that have a similar look but fundamentally different execution later on. In one of those rare moments where Jon Gruden says something truly useful on MNF, he pointed out where the Skins lined up in the exact same way on two offensive plays. The execution of the first (a basic gut run) set the defense up for the second (a pass to Davis or Cooley for a reasonable gain, if I remember correctly.)

The same idea holds true on defense. Just watch next game for how many times we stack the line of scrimmage with 7-8 guys, only to have 2-3 peel off into coverage, and it's not always the same three. In order to make the quarterback and the offensive line respect the threat of an all-out blitz, you occasionally have to call a true all-out blitz.

Personally, I'm a fan of the philosophy, but I think that we'd ideally have slightly better corners to keep ourselves from being exposed on the back end in the event we don't get to the QB in 3-4 seconds.

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With the Rams knocking on the door to score,even the commentator took out his illustrator pen and circled the nobody back here areas in the end zone before they scored a touchdown.

Was this another full dog blitz? Wouldn't it seem appropriate to leave at least two men home to cover? What is with this guy?

It was a Cover 0, all-out blitz look but it was not an all-out blitz. The only reason the Rams got the TD on that play was that Orakpo made a mistake in coverage, apparently assuming that Steven Jackson was staying in to block. I actually thought it was a pretty good playcall seeing as Orakpo would have easily been able to prevent that reception had he not hesitated/stumbled a bit.

Also,why can't Rex hold the ball with two hands when in the pocket? I would think that would be quarterback 101. This guy has to watch some tape of Cam Newton. He double clutches that ball so well , it's impressive for a rook.

Rex is Rex. :whoknows:

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Sometimes the blitz burns us, but, so far, it's burned opponents more than us. Also, it's worth noting that, although we often stack the line with 8-9 guys, oftentimes a few of those guys drop back into coverage when the ball is snapped. I don't know if that confuses opponents' quarterbacks, but it certainly confuses me. I have a pretty hard time if we're bringing 8-9 guys or just 3-4, with the rest dropping back in coverage.

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