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Music Television Turns 30 Years Old


Sticksboi05

What do you think of the new site?  

63 members have voted

  1. 1. What do you think of the new site?

    • Amazing
      30
    • Cool
      24
    • Could be better
      5
    • A letdown
      5

This poll is closed to new votes


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You sir, have an obsession with polls.

Best era is whenever you watched it regularly. To me the Beavis and Butthead thing made it stupid. They have some interesting programming now (not always good, but interesting), but as many of us older folks will tell you, it was better when it was more music and less reality shows.

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I think the 90s was when it was at its best (yes I'm biased because I was too young to watch it during the 80s). I remember rushing home from school to watch TRL. I also remember watching all the Spring Break stuff every year. The Real World was actually interesting back then too.

---------- Post added August-1st-2011 at 09:50 AM ----------

Would they just go ahead and change their name to The Societal Trash Network? What do they even have to do with music anymore?

I agree 100%. I always they should should be be RTV. Reality TV. The only music related stuff they show on there anymore is the VMAs.

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I think MTV was dictating the music insustry by the late 80s early 90s, it became less about the substance or talent and more about the style or look of those performing.

It was this sort of thing that gave us the Milli Vanillis people who would could not sing but were nice to look at

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Fixed that for you. :D

But seriously, I vote for the 90s. That was the decade when an artist's music and success was defined via video more than any other generation.

More than the 80s? I mean take a-ha for example. Solely known (in America) because of the Take on Me video.

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80's by far was the best era for MTV. It's not even close. All they did was play music videos and have interviews with the most popular musicians at the time. This was back when Michael Jackson, Prince, Madonna, Billy Idol, etc...were at their peak in popularity. Then you had the birth of Headbanger's Ball in the later 80's that played videos from Skid Row to Slayer. 80's without a doubt.

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More than the 80s? I mean take a-ha for example. Solely known (in America) because of the Take on Me video.

Yeah definitely. I mean all of 90s mainstream music trends had a direct relation to music videos. The seattle grunge era struck with Nirvana's 'Teen Spirit' video, Pearl Jam had all of the controversy with the 'Jeremy' video, then there were a ton of other acts that came through when the floodgates were opened (Soundgarden, STP, Temple of the Dog Alice in Chains, etc.) and each of these bands can thank MTV and music video rotation for their mainstream success, much more than any artist in the 80s could.

The same continued with the 90s Gfunk rap artists and the alternative rock acts that followed the grunge movement later in the decade. And this continued well into the early 2000s with artists like Eminem, Britney Spears and all of the boy bands that were so popular back then.

Today and in the 80s, an artist's music isn't/wasn't defined by music videos like it was in the 1990s.

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Yeah definitely. I mean all of 90s mainstream music trends had a direct relation to music videos. The seattle grunge era struck with Nirvana's 'Teen Spirit' video, Pearl Jam had all of the controversy with the 'Jeremy' video, then there were a ton of other acts that came through when the floodgates were opened (Soundgarden, STP, Temple of the Dog Alice in Chains, etc.) and each of these bands can thank MTV and music video rotation for their mainstream success, much more than any artist in the 80s could.

The same continued with the 90s Gfunk rap artists and the alternative rock acts that followed the grunge movement later in the decade. And this continued well into the early 2000s with artists like Eminem, Britney Spears and all of the boy bands that were so popular back then.

Today and in the 80s, an artist's music isn't/wasn't defined by music videos like it was in the 1990s.

Don't know if this if a repost but...

I'm not refuting anything you're saying. I remember when, for example, the big controversy in 99 was Britney Spears showing her midriff. But from everything I've read about the era/the fact that so many of the videos are still well-known today in our generation when alot of us were either babies, kids, or not even born at the time, music vids in the 80s were most associated with their artists. This certainly continued into the 90s. I mean everyone knows off the top of their head the music vid for Smells Like Teen Spirit. But when you think of names like a-ha, Peter Gabriel, Dire Straits, Michael Jackson, Madonna and Talking Heads music videos immediately come to mind. I mean does a band like Flock of Seagulls get popular unless MTV makes whacky hair and clothing cool? I mean yeah I Ran is a catchy song but let's be real. But I guess maybe you're saying it more defined the music itself than the style of the actual artist which I can understand.

Also distinctly remember when we got Windows 95 and Weezer's Buddy Holly was one of the demo videos. My brother and I used to watch it over and over.

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MTV is a part of 80's nostalgia, along with The Rubics Cube, New Coke and The Cosby Show, so the answer is the 80's and it's not even close. That being said, I'm not really enjoying VH1 Classic's MTV30 because of the lack of early MTV (81-83) content. But they did show the first hour of MTV, retro commercials and all, which was good.

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But I guess maybe you're saying it more defined the music itself than the style of the actual artist which I can understand.

Yeah, in general this is what I'm getting at. Plus, the 90s was really the first generation of kids to get into music solely via video. People still listened to the radio somewhat in the 80s, but in the 90s if you wanted to be anything in music, you had to get your material out on a video because that's the medium that people accessed their music from. Plus there was the whole Beavis and Butthead/Real World phenom that swept MTV in the 90s.

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Yeah, in general this is what I'm getting at. Plus, the 90s was really the first generation of kids to get into music solely via video. People still listened to the radio somewhat in the 80s, but in the 90s if you wanted to be anything in music, you had to get your material out on a video because that's the medium that people accessed their music from. Plus there was the whole Beavis and Butthead/Real World phenom that swept MTV in the 90s.

Well, I'm sure a lot of the 80's teens would argue they were the first generation to get into music because of videos and that the 90s were a continuation. I mean people still listen to the radio now and certainly did in the 90s.

I mean what's a more memorable video, Jeremy or Sledgehammer? Take on Me or Right Now? Thriller or just about anything? And that goes for Beat It and Billie Jean also. Waterfalls or Express Yourself?

But I get at what you're saying. Be interested to see what LKB has to say on the issue. Earth to LKB, hellooooo, this is Aqua man.

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Probably the 90s for me, I actually liked Say What Karaoke :ols:

I liked that show too!

I also loved TRL in its first few years. I watched it before it was TRL, when it was Total Request and it was just Carson Daly every night sitting in some weird, dark studio playing the top videos. Then it transitioned to Total Request Live in the afternoons, then came the live studio audience, etc, etc. However, I think you can blame TRL and its popularity on the changes in MTVs programming over the last several years.

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Well, I'm sure a lot of the 80's teens would argue they were the first generation to get into music because of videos and that the 90s were a continuation. I mean people still listen to the radio now and certainly did in the 90s.

I mean what's a more memorable video, Jeremy or Sledgehammer? Take on Me or Right Now? Thriller or just about anything? And that goes for Beat It and Billie Jean also. Waterfalls or Express Yourself?

But I get at what you're saying. Be interested to see what LKB has to say on the issue. Earth to LKB, hellooooo, this is Aqua man.

You can pick videos from any decade and match them up in a favorable light depending on the point you're trying to make...aka a pissing contest.

People did listen to radio in the 80s and they still do today, but hit music was defined by your ability to put out a hit video in the 90s more so than the 80s and certainly than today. The 80s probably had the consensus greatest video of all time (Thriller) but the 90s produced more great videos IMO.

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I liked that show too!

I also loved TRL in its first few years. I watched it before it was TRL, when it was Total Request and it was just Carson Daly every night sitting in some weird, dark studio playing the top videos. Then it transitioned to Total Request Live in the afternoons, then came the live studio audience, etc, etc. However, I think you can blame TRL and its popularity on the changes in MTVs programming over the last several years.

I think the change was inevitable. Especially once high-speed internet became commonplace and people could just go watch any video they wanted at any time, it removed the need for any video countdown. Youtube especially. That and the exploding ratings of reality TV like Survivor.

---------- Post added August-1st-2011 at 12:09 PM ----------

You can pick videos from any decade and match them up in a favorable light depending on the point you're trying to make...aka a pissing contest.

People did listen to radio in the 80s and they still do today, but hit music was defined by your ability to put out a hit video in the 90s more so than the 80s and certainly than today. The 80s probably had the consensus greatest video of all time (Thriller) but the 90s produced more great videos IMO.

Well, different style for sure. I wasn't trying to make a point of them being "better" but that they are more memorable. I mean to use the example of Take on Me. The famous rotoscoping video was the second video for the song. They released that and the song went nowhere. Then the famous video comes out and boom, #1 song in the country. But of course, that probably also is the case for REM's Losing My Religion. I mean, I don't know. I wasn't alive in the 80s and didn't have memory until the mid-90s so I claim no expertise whatsoever, just going by what I've read/what stuff I find has maintained cultural relevancy in Generation Y(1980-1994) decades after release. I just think that MTV's explosion in the 80s really made it the defining music vid decade.

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