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blindlywewander

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Hey guys. Just curious if there are any internet nerds on here. I'm having trouble with my wireless connection speed. Hooked directly to the modem, I get speeds around 34 mbs. Wireless, it's near 5. I know there's got to be some sort of setting on my router that I can change. I just have no clue what changes to make and I'm not the only one on this network (it's a family network), so I don't want to tamper unless I know I can restore/improve my internet.

Anyone have any idea what I can do here? Thanks

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Hey guys. Just curious if there are any internet nerds on here. I'm having trouble with my wireless connection speed. Hooked directly to the modem, I get speeds around 34 mbs. Wireless, it's near 5. I know there's got to be some sort of setting on my router that I can change. I just have no clue what changes to make and I'm not the only one on this network (it's a family network), so I don't want to tamper unless I know I can restore/improve my internet.

Anyone have any idea what I can do here? Thanks

A few of possible causes:

(1) You have a wireless device that is operating on the same frequency as your wireless router, which is probably a 3.5 GHz device. Check around the room and see if you have any wireless phones or such. If so, see if you can relocate the router to another area.

(2) There are other WLANs (wireless LANs) in the area operating on the same channel as your own WLAN. Browse the list of available WLANs and see if there are any others listed, and, if so, see what channels they are utilizing. If necessary, go and change the channel on your WLAN to one that's several below or above the other ones. (Channels 1 and 11 are a pretty good start if you can't see any of the above information).

(3) The wireless signal is experiencing attenuation, signal degradation, due to a physical object such as a wall or a piece of furniture, which the wireless radio signal cannot penetrate. If that is the case, move the device so there's a clear LOS between the router and the rest of the room/target computer.

(4) The problem is related to the speed of your wireless card or wireless router, which is limited to 5 Mbps, which means it is probably an 802.11b device or it's merely set to 802.11b on the router, which means you may need to change it to 802.11g to get up to 54 Mbps if that is the supported data rate on your computer/wireless device.

So, there's a few points where you can start with your investigation. Let us know if you need more help.

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A few of possible causes:

(1) You have a wireless device that is operating on the same frequency as your wireless router, which is probably a 3.5 GHz device. Check around the room and see if you have any wireless phones or such. If so, see if you can relocate the router to another area.

(2) There are other WLANs (wireless LANs) in the area operating on the same channel as your own WLAN. Browse the list of available WLANs and see if there are any others listed, and, if so, see what channels they are utilizing. If necessary, go and change the channel on your WLAN to one that's several below or above the other ones. (Channels 1 and 11 are a pretty good start if you can't see any of the above information).

(3) The wireless signal is experiencing attenuation, signal degradation, due to a physical object such as a wall or a piece of furniture, which the wireless radio signal cannot penetrate. If that is the case, move the device so there's a clear LOS between the router and the rest of the room/target computer.

(4) The problem is related to the speed of your wireless card or wireless router, which is limited to 5 Mbps, which means it is probably an 802.11b device or it's merely set to 802.11b on the router, which means you may need to change it to 802.11g to get up to 54 Mbps if that is the supported data rate on your computer/wireless device.

So, there's a few points where you can start with your investigation. Let us know if you need more help.

Thanks for the help man.

I've changed the channel several times with no difference. I'm pretty positive it's #4. And I'm also pretty positive it's an issue with the router. 3 computers and my XBOX are on the network and all run extremely slowly, even when just one of them is taking the bandwidth. I've gone and looked at my router settings but I don't know how to find the setting that needs changing. How would I go about doing that?

Thanks again.

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Thanks for the help man.

I've changed the channel several times with no difference. I'm pretty positive it's #4. And I'm also pretty positive it's an issue with the router. 3 computers and my XBOX are on the network and all run extremely slowly, even when just one of them is taking the bandwidth. I've gone and looked at my router settings but I don't know how to find the setting that needs changing. How would I go about doing that?

Thanks again.

Are all these computers/consoles connected wirelessly or hard wired (via a CAT5 or 6 Ethernet cable) to the router/modem? Regarding how you change the device settings, it really depends on the router and its user interface; you can connect to the router via its 192.168.x.x address, right? And it's a modem/gateway/router, and not network devices connected to a modem or gateway?

For example:

[computer]<--->[router/access point]<--->[modem]<--->(Internet)

Or

[computer]<--->[modem/LAN / WLAN]<--->(Internet)

What are the make/models of the network devices?

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Its a dlink 615 router. Nothing is directly connected to it or the modem. Our entire network is wireless. And to be completely honest, I am totally confused and/or dumbfounded by that either or situation lol. Im not an idiot I swear. I've just never dealt with this stuff before. Thanks again for your help.

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It's OK, man. I worked support for years, so this is all expected. Unless you work with this stuff it can be a bit confusing to wade through.

Just to verify, Blindly, is this Dlink router connected to a modem, or is the "router" a modem with WLAN capabilities which you use? Are we talking about one device (the Dlink device) or two devices (the Dlink device connected to a modem)?

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Another thing to look at once accessing the router, is to look at the logs to see who or what is connected. If you broadcast your SSID, and fail to institute a key for access to the network, you can end up sharing your bandwidth with neighbors.

Is your connection cable, DSL, frame relay or something else? What bandwidth does your provider say you are have.

You stated that 3 computers and an XBOX are connected to the WLAN. Are any of these computers using file sharing apps?

Baculus covered it pretty well with his explanations. If you tried his to no avail, take a look at who else is gaining access to your WLAN or if you have shareware or spyware on one of those PC's.

Oh and of course the question from my help desk days. Did you reboot?

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It's OK, man. I worked support for years, so this is all expected. Unless you work with this stuff it can be a bit confusing to wade through.

Just to verify, Blindly, is this Dlink router connected to a modem, or is the "router" a modem with WLAN capabilities which you use? Are we talking about one device (the Dlink device) or two devices (the Dlink device connected to a modem)?

It's a router connected to a modem. I've tested the modem speed, and I'm pulling around 40 mbs fairly consistently. In 4 tests yesterday, I got 40, 41, 38 and 38. So, I'm pretty positive it's the router having an issue. I've been emailing Dlink's tech support. They told me to update the firmware, which I did. But it had no effect, so I emailed back and they told me to call tech support - which you have to pay for.

Frustrating man.

Another thing to look at once accessing the router, is to look at the logs to see who or what is connected. If you broadcast your SSID, and fail to institute a key for access to the network, you can end up sharing your bandwidth with neighbors.

Is your connection cable, DSL, frame relay or something else? What bandwidth does your provider say you are have.

You stated that 3 computers and an XBOX are connected to the WLAN. Are any of these computers using file sharing apps?

Baculus covered it pretty well with his explanations. If you tried his to no avail, take a look at who else is gaining access to your WLAN or if you have shareware or spyware on one of those PC's.

Oh and of course the question from my help desk days. Did you reboot?

Thanks for getting in on the action lol. Any help is much appreciated. As for your questions, we've got a WEP key, so no one else is on it aside from my family. My connection is cable, and we're supposed to get between 15 and 45 mbs. And no, we don't use any file sharing stuff.

So - really I have no idea what it is. It might just be that we have a crappy router. I'm not sure though.

Thanks for helping guys. Although I may be screwed and have to fork out some cash for a better product haha..

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Do you download a lot of illegal content? Like movies and such? Because internet providers have agreed to crack down on users who do -- one of the first things they're going to do is slow down your connection.

But I don't think this has started yet and I believe you get an e-mail warning first.

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It's a router connected to a modem. I've tested the modem speed, and I'm pulling around 40 mbs fairly consistently. In 4 tests yesterday, I got 40, 41, 38 and 38. So, I'm pretty positive it's the router having an issue. I've been emailing Dlink's tech support. They told me to update the firmware, which I did. But it had no effect, so I emailed back and they told me to call tech support - which you have to pay for.

Frustrating man.

Yes, it can be frustrating.

Here is another suggestion, since we basically we have to verify that it's the wireless function of the router: take a laptop and connect directly into a LAN port on the router (using an Ethernet cable). Do you have good speeds? And if the hard-wired speed is good, what is your speed if you sit directly next to it with a laptop? Where are these devices stored -- a closet or stuck behind something?

If do get good LAN speeds, here are some further questions as a followup (and try to respond to each of them if you could, because one single issue could cause, and fix, all of your woes): Did you go through each of the steps I suggested? Are there any other WLANs in the area? Did you change channels? Did you make sure you're operating on 802.11g? Do you have any devices, cordless phones are always the worst culprit, operating on the same frequency as your router? Also, have you tried changing out the cable which is connecting the modem and the router, and how are these cables connected? From WAN to LAN, or from LAN to LAN?

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Do you download a lot of illegal content? Like movies and such? Because internet providers have agreed to crack down on users who do -- one of the first things they're going to do is slow down your connection.

But I don't think this has started yet and I believe you get an e-mail warning first.

Nah, I knocked that off after I got out of college. I just stream all my illegal content :ols:

Yes, it can be frustrating.

Here is another suggestion, since we basically we have to verify that it's the wireless function of the router: take a laptop and connect directly into a LAN port on the router (using an Ethernet cable). Do you have good speeds? And if the hard-wired speed is good, what is your speed if you sit directly next to it with a laptop? Where are these devices stored -- a closet or stuck behind something?

If do get good LAN speeds, here are some further questions as a followup (and try to respond to each of them if you could, because one single issue could cause, and fix, all of your woes): Did you go through each of the steps I suggested? Are there any other WLANs in the area? Did you change channels? Did you make sure you're operating on 802.11g? Do you have any devices, cordless phones are always the worst culprit, operating on the same frequency as your router? Also, have you tried changing out the cable which is connecting the modem and the router, and how are these cables connected? From WAN to LAN, or from LAN to LAN?

Ok, first of all, thank you for taking all this time to try to help me. It's much appreciated. Now, for all your questions - wireless directly next to the router (which is located on a desk, not in a closet or covered by anything) is around 6 mbs.

As for your steps:

- There are no other WLANs around aside from a wireless printer, but with that powered off there is no change (so I dont think there's any interference).

- I've changed the channels, tested, retested and rechanged channels - no change.

- I'm not sure how to check if I'm operating on 802.11g. This may be the answer?

- We don't use anything aside from cell phones here, so I don't think there's any interference.

- The cables go from the cable modem to a port labeled 'internet' on the router. I only have one other ehternet cable, but it's probably 10 feet long. When I get home later tonight, I'll try to change it out and test that.

Also I need to test the speeds when plugged in directly from the router. I'll update this post later tonight or tomorrow.

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As for your steps:

- There are no other WLANs around aside from a wireless printer, but with that powered off there is no change (so I dont think there's any interference).

- I've changed the channels, tested, retested and rechanged channels - no change.

- I'm not sure how to check if I'm operating on 802.11g. This may be the answer?

- We don't use anything aside from cell phones here, so I don't think there's any interference.

- The cables go from the cable modem to a port labeled 'internet' on the router. I only have one other ehternet cable, but it's probably 10 feet long. When I get home later tonight, I'll try to change it out and test that.

Also I need to test the speeds when plugged in directly from the router. I'll update this post later tonight or tomorrow.

Alright, here is what you want to do. Once you're directly connected to the router, open a browser and enter the router's IP address, which should be 192.168.0.1. If you haven't created a username/password, the default is admin and the password is blank. Once you've entered the router's configuration utility, you will need to navigate to the wireless configration area of the router. Click on the "Setup" button and "Wireless Settings" on the left-side navigation bar. Here is where any potential problems may originate.

Unless you are really using a PCMCIA wireless card which is a 802.11b hardware device, then change the wireless 802.11 mode to "802.11g Only." Also, disable "Enable Auto Channel Scan" (which I suspect it is if you have previously changed the WLAN channel). "Save Settings," allow the device to restart if need be, and then see if this has an immediate impact on your connectivity. If it doesn't, and if you don't have any other exterior sources of possible interference, from cordless phones to walls (if the router is in a closet) to other WLANs, then the router is possibly defective and I would just replace it. You can buy a new SoHo router for $50-$70, and it isn't worth the heartache of continually trying to fiddle with it. Sometimes they just don't work that well, being consumer-grade products.

One last thing: Look at the antenna on the router -- are they well-screwed into the router? Do they appear damaged in any fashion?

BTW, here is the manual for your router:

http://static.highspeedbackbone.net/pdf/D-Link-DIR-615-Manual.pdf

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