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How Much To Charge For Designing A Website?


Califan007

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Depends on the job.

I used to do flat rate, but was taken advantage of too often with jobs that never seemed to end.

Now I might charge a healthy hourly fee, and that helps make them more efficient in getting me what i need.

Or I might do a by-page rate.. I charge 125 per page. That keeps jobs from ballooning beyond control.

What kind of site?

~Bang

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Depends on the job.

I used to do flat rate, but was taken advantage of too often with jobs that never seemed to end.

Now I might charge a healthy hourly fee, and that helps make them more efficient in getting me what i need.

Or I might do a by-page rate.. I charge 125 per page. That keeps jobs from ballooning beyond control.

What kind of site?

~Bang

Standard company site with some ecommerce and event registration capabilities...

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Standard company site with some ecommerce and event registration capabilities...

I'd definitely go the hourly.

Dynamic programming can eat up some time unless you're going to use some plug in modules.

~Bang

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If you can get your hands on a copy of this

pricing.jpg

It'll give you a good idea of what to charge for different aspects of building the site.

Example, Are you writing copy? Taking the photos? Building the shopping cart?

All of these things are billable actions.

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Depends on how structured your requirements gathering is, and how formally you approach the contract. If everything is unstructured and informal, definitely go hourly because like Bang said, you'll be inundated with scope creep. If you can tightly define the requirements into a design doc, and have a contract that references it and defines how scope creep is handled, you can agree on a price for the whole project. But setting that price will largely depend on experience in setting prices :pfft: If you do development as a full time business, you'll eventually make more money with project-level pricing.

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Depends on the job.

I used to do flat rate, but was taken advantage of too often with jobs that never seemed to end.

Now I might charge a healthy hourly fee, and that helps make them more efficient in getting me what i need.

thatswhatshesaid

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I'd definitely go the hourly.

Dynamic programming can eat up some time unless you're going to use some plug in modules.

~Bang

How much per hour? lol...

Example, Are you writing copy? Taking the photos? Building the shopping cart?

All of these things are billable actions.

Not writing copy, not taking photos, I'm doing graphics and I'm building the shopping cart...however, I will probably just use the shopping cart that comes with the hosting site (if one does, that is). I may farm out the event registration stuff to a website that specializes in that area, although I'll still have to create the look of the registration sites myself.

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How much per hour? lol...

Not writing copy, not taking photos, I'm doing graphics and I'm building the shopping cart...however, I will probably just use the shopping cart that comes with the hosting site (if one does, that is). I may farm out the event registration stuff to a website that specializes in that area, although I'll still have to create the look of the registration sites myself.

I charge 75 per hour, but I'm cheap.

Carts are a breeze with Paypal. I always recommend using it. So many people do, it's much more apt to get an order than someone having to fill out their credit card info.

~Bang

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I charge 75 per hour, but I'm cheap.

Carts are a breeze with Paypal. I always recommend using it. So many people do, it's much more apt to get an order than someone having to fill out their credit card info.

~Bang

The last site I created, I used the shopping cart that came with the hosting site, but used Paypal for the payment processing (Paypal and credit cards, both). It was rather simple but took some time to customize, as well as making sure I dotted and crossed every "i" and "t" so that there weren't any hitches when it came to paying for something. That took longer than expected as well.

So Paypal has a shopping cart that you can use for your products? I thought they just did the payment processing.

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The last site I created, I used the shopping cart that came with the hosting site, but used Paypal for the payment processing (Paypal and credit cards, both). It was rather simple but took some time to customize, as well as making sure I dotted and crossed every "i" and "t" so that there weren't any hitches when it came to paying for something. That took longer than expected as well.

So Paypal has a shopping cart that you can use for your products? I thought they just did the payment processing.

You can easily set up shopping carts in Paypal under the Merchants Tools section.

real easy. but a bit time consuming.

~J

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Hey website designing people types.. I just read this article this morning and found it very interesting.

http://socialmediatoday.com/steve-olenski/310699/how-social-media-affects-search-marketing

Basically, the bottom line is that the network that a company builds through social sites like facebook directly impacts search engine requests. It seems that the larger a company's "friends" base on facebook, the more it affected google searches when a searcher was logged in to google. A person logged in to google was more apt to find results based on the activities of their facebook group, which spreads the possibilities of moving up the Google 'charts" faster and further.

Sounds like I'm going to be offering a new service to a site customer after the site is built, and that is to manage their social network to try and drive as many people to their facebook page as I can.

Those of us in the biz know SEO is often a combination of alchemy and guesswork as you try and pin down the best search terms and keywords.. to see that facebook affects it so directly solidifies things a bit, eh?

~Bang

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I don't create websites... other than my own, but for production work I actually do both when possible. I charge a per hour rate with a floor. That way we know the project will cost at least "x" and if it exceeds x hours, then there is a way for me not to get totally screwed. I also put in checkpoints as in... if the price reaches this threshhold then check with the customer and see what they want to do. Usually, prices don't get outrageous because of me. I'm quick and effecient and don't like to waste anyone's time including my own, but like Bang said, you sometimes have customers that keep on adding in things or forgetting things, or just want an infinite number of minor edits and tweaks. These clients never have a clue at how annoying or how much they're taking advantage of you either.

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