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Riddle time!


DeaconTheVillain

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On the first day of a new job, a colleague invites you around for a barbecue. As the two of you arrive at his home, a young boy throws open the door to welcome his father. “My other two kids will be home soon!” remarks your colleague.

Waiting in the kitchen while your colleague gets some drinks from the basement, you notice a letter from the principal of the local school tacked to the noticeboard. “Dear Parents,” it begins, “This is the time of year when I write to all parents, such as yourselves, who have a girl or girls in the school, asking you to volunteer your time to help the girls' soccer team.” “Hmmm,” you think to yourself, “clearly they have at least one of each!”

This, of course, leaves two possibilities: two boys and a girl, or two girls and a boy. Are these two possibilities equally likely, or is one more likely than the other?

Note: This is not a trick puzzle. You should assume all things that it seems you're meant to assume, and not assume things that you aren't told to assume. If things can easily be imagined in either of two ways, you should assume that they are equally likely. For example, you may be able to imagine a reason that a colleague with two boys and a girl would be more likely to have invited you to dinner than one with two girls and a boy. If so, this would affect the probabilities of the two possibilities. But if your imagination is that good, you can probably imagine the opposite as well. You should assume that any such extra information not mentioned in the story is not available.

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*lightbulb*

I got it!

The "colleague" is actually a woman! We live in such a sexist society that most people would read that story and assume it was a man. But really it's a woman--your wife, who works at the same company as you. When the kids welcome home their father, they are actually referring to you. YOU'RE the father!

What a great trick question. I can't believe I figured out the answer. I am a genius.

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*lightbulb*

I got it!

The "colleague" is actually a woman! We live in such a sexist society that most people would read that story and assume it was a man. But really it's a woman--your wife, who works at the same company as you. When the kids welcome home their father, they are actually referring to you. YOU'RE the father!

What a great trick question. I can't believe I figured out the answer. I am a genius.

Um... not only does that not answer the question, but the second sentence refers to "his" home.

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This, of course, leaves two possibilities: two boys and a girl, or two girls and a boy. Are these two possibilities equally likely, or is one more likely than the other?

'K, let's look at this with GHH logic, and pray I paid attention in math.

We know that one child is a boy. And we also know that a second child is a boy. Now, presuming there's no twins, and these are all independent, seperate births, that leaves the group of kids with three possibilities:

Boy/ Boy/ Girl

Boy/ Girl/ Boy

Boy/ Girl/ Girl

So by my reckoning, there's a 2/3 chance of two boys and a girl; and a 1/3 chance of two girls and a boy.

So I'ma going with the answer your colleague has two boys and a girl as the most likely answer. Which Cali and Kaos have already answered.

And now my head hurts.

Hail.

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You know the first child to open the door was a boy.

You also assume that they have at least one girl, because of the letter on the fridge.

Therefore, the third child is the only unknown. Statistically, there are more men in the world then women, so it is (very slightly) more likely that the child is male.

The only other explanation is that one of the parents is staffed at the school, in which case the assumption in line two is thrown out.

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Note: This is not a trick puzzle. You should assume all things that it seems you're meant to assume, and not assume things that you aren't told to assume. If things can easily be imagined in either of two ways, you should assume that they are equally likely. For example, you may be able to imagine a reason that a colleague with two boys and a girl would be more likely to have invited you to dinner than one with two girls and a boy. If so, this would affect the probabilities of the two possibilities. But if your imagination is that good, you can probably imagine the opposite as well. You should assume that any such extra information not mentioned in the story is not available.

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'K, let's look at this with GHH logic, and pray I paid attention in math.

We know that one child is a boy. And we also know that a second child is a boy. Now, presuming there's no twins, and these are all independent, seperate births, that leaves the group of kids with three possibilities:

Boy/ Boy/ Girl

Boy/ Girl/ Boy

Boy/ Girl/ Girl

So by my reckoning, there's a 2/3 chance of two boys and a girl; and a 1/3 chance of two girls and a boy.

So I'ma going with the answer your colleague has two boys and a girl as the most likely answer. Which Cali and Kaos have already answered.

And now my head hurts.

Hail.

Well done.

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The answer is clearly that the 3rd child is a hermaphrodite.

:rotflmao: LMAOOOOOOOO!!!!!! Yea I woulda guessed 2 boys and a girl right off the bat. Just because a father would be more likely to say 'my girls will be home soon' if he were to have 2 girls and one boy as opposed to 'my other 2 kids will be home soon.' It's science. And I'm not even a father.

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'K, let's look at this with GHH logic, and pray I paid attention in math.

We know that one child is a boy. And we also know that a second child is a boy. Now, presuming there's no twins, and these are all independent, seperate births, that leaves the group of kids with three possibilities:

Boy/ Boy/ Girl

Boy/ Girl/ Boy

Boy/ Girl/ Girl

So by my reckoning, there's a 2/3 chance of two boys and a girl; and a 1/3 chance of two girls and a boy.

So I'ma going with the answer your colleague has two boys and a girl as the most likely answer. Which Cali and Kaos have already answered.

And now my head hurts.

Hail.

the problem is, I don't think each of your scenarios follow a uniform distribution. I'm going to go ahead and label each child. We know for a fact there is a boy and we met him; I'll call him Boy A. We know for a fact there is a girl, though we have not seen her; I'll name her Soccer Girl. the remaining child will be either Boy B or Girl B. If the remaining two children are revealed to us (soccer girl is known to exist, but she has not been revealed), there's a 50 percent chance that the first one revealed to us is Soccer girl. if its not soccer girl, then the remaining scenarios for the first child to be revealed are 25% boy B, and 25% Girl B. that makes the probability of the first child to be revealed 75% chance of being a girl. If Girl B is revealed first, then Soccer girl is a lock to be the second child revealed. If Soccer girl is the first child revealed, there's a 50% chance the next child is Boy B or Girl B.

so Soccer girl then Girl B scenario is .5*.5 = .25

Girl B then Soccer girl is .25 * 1 = .25

.25 + .25 = .5 = 50% chance of two girls.

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People with PhD's have argued that it is 50/50. But using some crazy math I don't even begin to understand 2/3 chance that its 2 boys and one girl is correct.

Ignore that we know one of them is a boy. Throwing out BB, because we know all three can not be a boy, the question then remains, what are the other possible combinations

BG

GG

GB

and thus a 2/3 chance of of two boys 1 girl and 1/3 chance two girls one cup.

Throwing out the combo of BB, we are left with GG, BG, and GB. In the first case, overall we have two girls and one boy. In the second and third cases, we have two boys and one girl.

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Jack and his wife went to a party where four other married

couples were present. Every person shook hands with everyone

he or she was not acquainted with. When the handshaking was

over, Jack asked everyone, including his own wife, how many

hands they shook. To his surprise, Jack got nine different

answers. How many hands did Jack's wife shake ?

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