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WRAL.com: NC considering paying students for good grades


DieselPwr44

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http://www.wral.com/news/state/nccapitol/story/9420913/

RALEIGH, N.C. — Nine-year-old Samantha Hubbard's eyes popped open for an instant as the thought flashed through her mind.

Would she study harder if North Carolina offered to pay her $1,000 a year from first grade through high-school graduation if she came to class, behaved, and earned good grades?

So, my wife who teaches second grade, has had her pay, along with everyone else's, frozen for four years and has had orders for new textbooks delayed for 3 years (the claim is there's no money) and now you want to pay kids for good grades??

Stupid people in the legislature here....

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Paying studnets for grades means more parents who blame the teacher for "giving" their child a bad grade. This will further the passing the responsibility problem as parents will look to children to get good grades to help pay the bills. And the parents, will of course, complain at every chance if their child was "given" that bad grade. Never do they actually believe or want to believe that their child EARNED that grade.

This big time inflates the issue.

Horrible idea.

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Adults work for incentives, so why not kids? I do have an issue with cash as an incentive. It puts too much pressure on students AND teachers. Field trips, other activities, scholarships, etc. are better incentives for youngsters.

As I mentioned earlier, my wife teaches second grade and those kids are just now starting to understand what money is. Like in quarter,nickel or dime.

Incentives like field trips or parties are great but paying first graders(or anyone k-12) cash is wrong,imo.

Heck, when I was in high school, if you had outstanding grades, you got to skip end of semester finals, basically a day off. That's incentive.

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I thought that was the parents job.

My kid gets paid, always has.. he gets 20 bucks for an A, 10 for a B, 1 for a C, and nothing for a D.. and if he ever gets an F, he pays me. (He has not)

He averages about 60 - 70 bucks per quarter, and that Honor Roll sure looks nice with his name on it.

I'll be damned if the school should pay kids for grades.

~Bang

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I see two problems.

Where does this money come from (as others have said, school system is already strapped for cash) and I don't like just handing the kids/parents a check. If it were cash into a designated college fund, I could see some merit in that. But would that really be an incentive to kids that aren't already doing well?

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Is payment that big of a motivator for students? Whatever it would be, I don't think it would be enough to motivate the slackers. I would have to think that kids' first motivation is not getting in trouble with their parents, and then getting money. Giving kids more attention is probably way more effective.

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I'm telling you... Having schools pay the kids for grades is a problem waiting to explode.

We pay bonuses to schools and teachers for above average results....Why not the students?

I agree it would be better w/o doing either,but holding teachers,parents and student responsible is asking too much.

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We pay bonuses to schools and teachers for above average results....Why not the students?

I agree it would be better w/o doing either,but holding teachers,parents and student responsible is asking too much.

I don't think you understand.

Most parents blame teachers for "giving" their children bad grades, when in reality they EARN the bad grade.

Paying students is going to be a source of income for the poor families, thus more issues.

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obviously you soldn't HAVE to.. but that isn't the question we should be asking. The question is whether it would be an efficient use of funds, and whether it would work.

for earlier grades (ie. young students), you really aren't paying the student, you are paying the parents. Currently in some districts parents are totally absent, and aren't doing **** to ensure that their 8 year old makes it to class, and aren't supporting the teracher if that 8 year old is in class, but is disruptive (school in that case is just a subsidized baby sitting service that allows you to legally pass of this irritant to someone else every day so you can get drunk, or whatever, in peace)

if this helps align incentives of POS parents with the struggling schools for the betterment of the students (and hopefully helping to stop the creation of of a future POS parent) then it is worth at least trying... especially if it is done in the context a broader assistance reform: for instance in districts where many families are already receiving assistance anyway, reduce another form aof assistance , and institute this.... in that case a hard working single mother that is trying to stay in work and off the dole but is still living near the poverty ALSO gets assistance, but its not welfare, its a reward for being a good parent.

---------- Post added April-13th-2011 at 03:01 PM ----------

Oh I think I understand the education system is broken and many parents are not doing their job.

agree with the second part, but not with the first. public schools still work very well in areas where parents do as well.. it isn't schools that are breaking down, although you might argue that society is...? on the other hand, if you watch old Little rscals episodes... in the past we look so fondly to for "how we used to do it right..." the way we succeeded was by just basically allowing kids of parents who didn't care to drop out of the system. If a kid was playing huck finn all school day, and floating down the river instead of going to school.. he neither dragged down the other students, nor the school's "average". and ... eventually he could STILL get a good quality blue collar job when he grew up.

the disappearance of that last part might be the biggest problem of all...

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I thought that was the parents job.
Many are obviously not doing their job though.
And that's the real issue... or at least one of the biggest ones.

This...

IMO... the school system should find a way to address the problem... not the symptom

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This...

IMO... the school system should find a way to address the problem... not the symptom

a fine and noble sentiment... except that you actually havn't said anything. if you want to take this stand you need to identify what you think is the core problem that is being ignored (instead of the symptom) and then suggest how you would better address it? .... or else what you said is nothing but a platitude.

it SEEMS like you are saying that the core problem is worthless parents... how in the world is the "schools system" supposed to address THAT core problem?

So far in the Tailgate today I've seen some schools ban homes from lunch, and now thoughts of the state paying kids for their grades. By the time I have kids I'll just be handing them over to the state to raise them :ols:

and the unfortunate fact is that in some school districts that would probably be a big improvement. Its probably not the case in your parent's school district, though (where you either just recently left, or are about to move out of)....

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I live in NC and have attended several committee meetings at the NC Legislative Building. This horrible idea does not surpise me in the least.

Where does the money come from? The amount of potential problems and corruption in this program could be very big.

I would only support this type of program if the money came from private donations ( in the future the state could help out financially but not right now or for the foreseeable future). Also, this program should not go towards direct payments to the students but towards a savings account that can only be used by the student for college, post high school career training, or a down payment on a house or something along those lines.

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a fine and noble sentiment...

WOW...thanks... :-)

... except that you actually havn't said anything....

Oh... :-(

...if you want to take this stand you need to identify what you think is the core problem that is being ignored (instead of the symptom) and then suggest how you would better address it? .... or else what you said is nothing but a platitude.

Actually... I believe I identified what I believe to be the core problem throught the use of quotes... but thanks for your input...

...it SEEMS like you are saying that the core problem is worthless parents... how in the world is the "schools system" supposed to address THAT core problem?

Your inferencing skills are awesome!

As for actually addressing the problem... If I knew the answer... we wouldn't be having this discussion. But I think finding a way to hold the parents accountable (which is easier said than done) for the acheivement of the students is essential for the school system to see gain with regards to their product.

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Johnny, if you do your homework, you can play XBOX.

Johnny, if you clean your room, you can play outside.

Johnny, if you behave at the market, you can get a candy bar on the way out.

Johnny, if you show up for soccer practice, you get a trophy at the end of the year no matter what.

Johnny, if you get good grades, you get $1000 bucks.

No wonder intrisic motivation seems to be a thing of the past.

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This would be a waste of money, even if done properly. It may motivate a minute chunk of kids, but if there's bad parenting at the root, its tough to change that course.

But lets face it, the world needs un-skilled workers and manual laborers (no disrespect at all).

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Many are obviously not doing their job though.

So you'd rather the state do it?

Hmm.. you must have an excellent chiropractor.

~Bang

---------- Post added April-13th-2011 at 08:52 PM ----------

Where does the money come from?

I know! We can cut teacher's salaries!

~Bang

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So you'd rather the state do it?

Hmm.. you must have an excellent chiropractor.

~Bang

They are gonna take the money and piss it away anyway

Bribing the kids should eliminate the need for some superintendents and counselors,maybe we could even increase classroom size :D

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