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Why aren't more Middle Linebackers head coaches?


Burgold

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I was reading some stuff on Chris Hanburger and how he called the defense on the field, had over 200 audibles, was responsible for making sure everyone gets lined up properly, etc. and I began to wonder why guys like that don't get their shot? I think there are relatively few middle linebackers who get to be the head man in the NFL and yet they are a coach on the field or at least usually the qb of the defense.

To the same degree, it never makes sense to me why qbs usually make such bad head coaches or why there aren't that many who get a shot at the lead job (though I guess the former is the answer to the latter lol)

But the way he's described Hanberger would have made an incredible d-coordinator or head coach. Maybe he wasn't interested, but it is strange how few of the field generals get to be sideline generals.

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IMO, it really is the same with everyday life. What I mean is not everyone who actually plays (regardless of position and task on the field) are also capable of seeing the bigger picture. By that I mean "place middle linebacker name here" studied his playbook in and out and knew/knows it better than anyone else on the team defensively speaking. He can get everyone in the right spots before a play and he can diagnose problems in advance to try and solve them as best anyone can. However, this can be compared to doctors who run an entire hospital or electricians who run big projects. Just because is good or even great at whatever they do does not mean they posses the same qualities it takes to do something with a much wider view required for work in the same field of practice. Not every Doctor has the qualities to mesh with personalities, or can determine just how much to dictate for others to do, or can figure out what direction a hospital's "expertise" should be in for it's own best future. Same can be said for an electrician, just because someone can wire things and even put projects in per plans (made by someone else like a coach) doesn't mean that they have the quality to come up with the plans themselves for the owner of the project.

I'm not saying they shouldn't be given a chance or that they wouldn't make a good coach but really coaching has to come from within and be basically born into you much like their physical abilities. If you don't have it you don't have it and a vast majority of players in general don't have it especially the good to great players in the NFL. I've noticed that most of the players whom become coaches seem to be those who weren't the most gifted but good enough to hang around and learn basically while playing.

Anyhow, just food for thought.

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Middle linebackers are usually really talented players. Generally speaking' date=' really talented players are terrible coaches, because they lack patience and understanding for those who aren't as good as them.[/quote']

Hence, the reason why good qb's have not been good coaches. I believe Sean Payton is the only current successful head coach that was a qb in the NFL. Payton was a qb during the scab games!

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Players make a good chunk of money in the NFL. Once their playing days are over, there isn't a lot of incentive to start at the bottom of the coaching tree. Those kinds of jobs don't pay enough and they aren't glamorous. They rather have a television/radio job or start their own business.

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Good player =/ good coach. In addition to all of the above stated reasons I'm sure the frequent occurence of concussions isn't helping any of them.

Being a head coach is much more about managing personalities and delegating responsibilities than it is about truly knowing football. Not to say you want to hire a CEO to coach your team but the football knowledge/schemes are only a small part of it.

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Hence, the reason why good qb's have not been good coaches. I believe Sean Payton is the only current successful head coach that was a qb in the NFL. Payton was a qb during the scab games!

It'll be interesting to see what Jim Harbaugh does, then, seeing as he's the only reasonably good former QB with a head coaching gig. :ols:

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Then again, he had no coordinator experience. I believe if he gets a DC job anywhere, he'd be a better HC the second time around.

I think even his experience as a head coach with the 49ers will make him a better head coach the second time around. He'll be refining his skills as a position coach or coordinator, but he definitely learned some important lessons from his stint as head coach.

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I agree....like catchers make good managers in baseball.....MLB in football know everything that is going on

Except catchers are usually among the worst paid, lightest hitting, least pampered guys on the roster.

MLBs are superstars.

---------- Post added February-7th-2011 at 02:15 PM ----------

Except catchers are usually among the worst paid' date=' lightest hitting, least pampered guys on the roster.

MLBs are superstars.[/quote']

Singletary failed, in part, because he could not understand why all his players did not try as hard and have as much talent as Mike Singletary.

Name a great NFL coach that was a great NFL player. The best example I can think of is Mike Ditka and your mileage may vary on whether you think he was even a competent coach.

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Singletary failed' date=' in part, because he could not understand why all his players did not try as hard and have as much talent as Mike Singletary.[/quote']

His lack of a quarterback also had something to do with it, but you're absolutely right. His expectations of heart, toughness and respect were always higher than what his players provided and he often reacted badly to their falling short of those expectations.

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Most of coaching is teaching (duh). Just because you know something in and out, doesn't mean you can explain how to do it to someone else. Sometimes, it's instinctive or comes naturally, how do you explain that to somebody?

A good counter question is that why do so many "nobody" people who never played in the NFL or were starters get to be head coaches? Gibbs, Parcells, Belichick... maybe when you're slow and short and small (3S) then you gotta use your noggin more than your body. You try to understand things that will give you the advantage.

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