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Poll: Greatest Redskins Linebacker of all time.


polywog999

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Monte Coleman

Chuck Drazenovich

Chris Hanburger

Ken Harvey

Sam Huff

Wilbur Marshall

Harold McLinton

Neal Olkewicz

Brian Orakpo

Marcus Washington

LaVar Arrington

I have left off many deserving Linebackers from this list. Especially roll players like Kurt Gouveia and Matt Millian who were incredibly good at what they did and how they contributed.

I realize that a lot of you young folks do not remember the older guys on this list, so here is a little help.....

Chuck Drazenovich played before many of us were aware that there were the Redskins. That doesn't mean that his numbers weren't super. In his 10 year career with the Skins he played in 113 games during which he intercepted 15 passes and recovered 9 fumbles. He played in four Pro Bowls

Although Monte Coleman did not play in a Pro Bowl, his numbers are more than adequate. In his 16 years as a Redskin he garnered 43.5 sacks; 17 interceptions, 3 returned for touchdowns; and 999 tackles. He also has 4 career touchdowns and returned a fumble for a touchdown. He also played in 21 playoff games.

Chris Hanburger's years with the Redskins extended from the mediocre days of the 1960s into the George Allen Era of the 1970s. His numbers make him more than worthy of Hall of Fame induction. In his 14 year career with the Redskins he played in 9 Pro Bowls (1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972,1973, 1974, 1975, and 1976). He was selected 1st team all-Pro 4 times (1969, 1972, 1973, 1975). He recovered 17 fumbles returning 8 of them for touchdowns. His honors go on and on and on:

Sam Huff is in the Hall of Fame, but remember that he played for the New York Giants a good number of years before joining the Redskins. He became known as the prototypical National Football League middle linebacker thanks to a segment on "The Twentieth Century" Television Show with Walter Cronkite. In that show Huff was shown playing the game with commentary from Cronkite and others. He played for the Redskins only from 1964 through 1969. He played in one Pro Bowl during his career with the Skins. He played in 66 games and garnered 12 interceptions and 1 touchdown.

Wilbur Marshall played 80 games for the Redskins during a span of 5 years. He played in three Pro Bowls (1986, 1987, 1992). He was named first team all-pro twice (1986, 1992). He achieved 24.5 sacks and 12 interceptions as well as 621 tackles. In 1991 alone he got 5 interceptions.

Harold McLinton had a 10 year career with the Redskins. He played in 127 games and collected 4 interceptions and 1 touchdown during his career. I do remember one play McLinton was involved in. I guess it was in 1969. The Redskins were playing the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis. I happened to be attending a university in St. Louis at the time and went to that game. McLinton laid out a Cardinal with an unbelievable hit the refs called a clothesline. He was penalized 15 yards for unnecessary roughness.

Neal Olkewicz had a 11 year career with the Redskins. During that time he played in 150 games and amassed 12 sacks and 6 interceptions.

My list was mostly taken from the Washington Times, as well as the individual write-ups:

The best -- as I see it! Part VI: the linebackers

http://www.washingtontimes.com/weblogs/redskins-fan-forum/2008/jul/23/the-best----as-i-see-it-part-vi-the-linebackers/

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Chris Hanburger without a doubt though London Fletcher should be in there as well.

I apologize for leaving Fletch off the list. He definitely deserves to be on it.

---------- Post added January-13th-2011 at 08:12 PM ----------

Hopefully Orakpo will make a case for his spot before too long :)

I actually considered him, but no, he needs to play a few more years for us.

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Kurt was an awesome Redskin, when he intercepted the football in SB XXVI I felt so happy for him.

Monte has the biggest heart I ever saw at LB.

The LB tandem we have in SB XXVI is the best for me, Marshall, Gouveia, Collins, Coleman, oh my god!!! Millen was deactivated :(.

But Hanburger is the man.

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Arrington no doubt! I mean he did that whole Lavar Leap thing at Penn State. Oh wait, he tried that a few times in the NFL and got pancaked.

Seriously though, I'm going with Wilbur Marshall simply for being a main stay during the Skins' glory years. Sorry Chris...

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No Fletch so I went with Harvey, simply because I remember how much of a beast he was. Hanburger's stats and film is nasty, but it's tough to vote against the linebacker that made you realize how ****ing awesome that position is.

Nothing to add here. I couldn't have said it better myself. This is why I'm voting for Harvey.

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None of these guys other than Chris Hanburger should get a single vote.

Not only did he play 14 years, and ONLY for the Redskins (unlike Huff, Harvey, Marshall, Arrington, Washington) but he went to more Pro Bowls than any other Redskin before or since.

Any other vote is like saying that Rypien, Williams, or Theismann is the teams greatest QB just because you didn't see Baugh play.

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I was the 4th vote, but I voted for LaVar just to piss NewCliche off and see if I could get him fired up into one of his blowhard rants again. :ols:

I'm not sure what excuse the other three have.

That attempt was as underperforming as LaVar's play. Good thing your vote was fourth and not second overall. :)

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Hanburger, without a doubt, was one of the most dominating LBs of all time in the NFL. He was an 18th, yes 18th, round draft pick.

Not sure of his exact size, but if I had to guess I'd say 5'10" 190lbs. His nickname was "The Hangman" so you know he was a tough SOB. A really, really tough **** who didn't back down tackling anybody in the NFL. Brought it every play, every game.

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Well, it was the second non-ninja vote for LaVar, who I see has picked up yet another vote. Looks like the tides have turned.

LOL, the tides have turned? What does that even mean?

Hanburger, without a doubt, was one of the most dominating LBs of all time in the NFL. He was an 18th, yes 18th, round draft pick.

Not sure of his exact size, but if I had to guess I'd say 5'10" 190lbs. His nickname was "The Hangman" so you know he was a tough SOB. A really, really tough **** who didn't back down tackling anybody in the NFL. Brought it every play, every game.

Agreed about Hanburger running away with this one. Disagreed about his nickname meaning that he was one tough SOB. It could easily mean that he was very, very poor at guessing letters.

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Hanburger, without a doubt, was one of the most dominating LBs of all time in the NFL. He was an 18th, yes 18th, round draft pick.

Not sure of his exact size, but if I had to guess I'd say 5'10" 190lbs. His nickname was "The Hangman" so you know he was a tough SOB. A really, really tough **** who didn't back down tackling anybody in the NFL. Brought it every play, every game.

Just a shade under 6-2 and usually listed between 215 and 220 though according to most of his teammates he played most games between 205 and 210. While not big, he was not undersized for his day. In the 60s and 70s, 6-2/215 was about right-size for an OLB in most 4-3 variations.

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