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My Messege for WMATA


colt4qb

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"I've lived in the DC area for 27 years. I've been riding the metro for 10 of them. Today was a perfect reminder why I refuse to pay for your service because of your around-the-clock delays, constant out of service escalators, trigger happy subway conductors, etc.

I stopped riding metro since I experienced the Chicago system 2 years ago and realized inefficient WMATA has run their system. Delays run around the clock. You can't even make any appointments on time despite notices posted on the WMATA site. Red line is constant stop-go-stop-go-stop-go. I'm glad I don't get motion sick easily.

The escalators are ALWAYS under maintenance no matter where you go. It will not be functional for 3 weeks maybe more, be operational for what seem is a few days, then go out for an additional 3 or more weeks; an endless cycle. Do you really think people enjoy walking up and down escalators packed like sardines during rush hour? Why can't they stay consistently in operation?

Aside from the issues you can't really help you have train conductors who close the doors AS SOON as they open. I've noticed this in Chinatown from time to time. They don't even give ample time for people to get off, ring the notification that doors are closing and then people are ready to stampede onto the train. This doens't make it safe for ANY rider.

I can't imagine anyone paying for this system if they had the option. Not to mention, WMATA enforced a fare increase. This isn't warranted in my book and is completely unethical.

In sharp contrast, Chicago based system train cars are very old and withstand the brute of the harshest weather that mother nature has to offer. The trains are old but are seldom on delays. They even run 24/7! Additionally they're sparking clean all the time.

I've never witnessed a family being seperated due to the door closing too fast because they leave the doors open long enough for people to come in and out.

Granted their systems do not have escalators so they're no outtages but not even shopping malls have as many escalator outtages as WMATA's system.

All of this Chicago's greatness for an affordable rate. I paid 86 dollars for a 30 day pass. Their service is so great, I'd be willing to pay double for that. Just for work commuting that would be rougly 2.90 a day.. ALL DAY. WMATA? I pay 4.75 back and forth and almost the same for parking.. This total? 14.25.. I could purchase the 7 day 45 dollar pass but still way more than Chicago's 23 dollar 7 day pass at much better service.

I honestly think management is very poor. WMATA should consider hiring a manager from a succesful system like Chicago's CTA."

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I tried taking metro from the Pentagon city stop to the pentagon stop. 1 stop. And it would have been the first time I had rode metro since I was a kid. So I had no idea they didn't accept $20s. And the credit card machine was down. So I asked where I could get change and they said I would have to go all the way back to the mall and buy something to get change! I just walked to the Pentagon. I was shocked at how crappy of a system it had become.

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I feel your pain.

I was late to work 3 days last week because of train malfunctions. I've been late to work one day this week because of a "sick passenger" on a train ahead of ours. And I've gotten home late just as many times because of metro. This is an every week thing and has been for a long time.

Not to mention, every single station I pass through has at least one broken down escalator and if you need help from a station manager they're nowhere to be found.

Metro just raised fares on us this past weekend. That fare raise will cost me an extra $98 a year. They're doing another raise in August and I haven't even calculated that one yet.

Metro is getting more expensive and the service is getting worse. I'm actually taking the day off tomorrow to go to the DMV and get my SUV all legal so I can start driving to work. I'm not leaving my house and hour and a half early just to guarantee that I get to work on time and I'm not getting fired because I come in late several times a week due to metro. I'll bite the bullet and brave the traffic. It's about the same price now and at least my drive is from the inside of the city to the burbs so I'll be going the opposite direction of the big crowds.

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I feel your pain.

I was late to work 3 days last week because of train malfunctions. I've been late to work one day this week because of a "sick passenger" on a train ahead of ours. And I've gotten home late just as many times because of metro. This is an every week thing and has been for a long time.

W/ the increasing temps now, I wouldn't be surprised if this happens a lot more. Occasionally I'll run into a train w/ the AC not working. It was probably more than 100+ in some of those malfunctioning cars.

My car is out of service so I was forced to take the metro. I considered just staying home but opted not to bc of important meetings. The fact that I was thinking about staying home due to the poor system is a testament on how bad it really is.

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W/ the increasing temps now, I wouldn't be surprised if this happens a lot more. Occasionally I'll run into a train w/ the AC not working. It was probably more than 100+ in some of those malfunctioning cars.

My car is out of service so I was forced to take the metro. I considered just staying home but opted not to bc of important meetings. The fact that I was thinking about staying home due to the poor system is a testament on how bad it really is.

Seriously, it's terrible. I get into at least a handful of cars a week with no A/C. It's bad when you break a sweat between metro stops. I'll jump out and switch cars at the next stop when it happens. Just one more problem in a long list of metro miscues.

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I can't imagine anyone paying for this system if they had the option. Not to mention, WMATA enforced a fair increase. This isn't warranted in my book and is completely unethical.

If the increase is fair then what does it matter? :confused:

:evilg:

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Well, what do you expect? The nation's second busiest rapid transit system has no dedicated funding then people ***** when they have to vote on bills that give it funding every year. And in case you're wondering, yes it is basically the only system that has no dedicated funding.

The whole thing is flawed. The good thing is, all the problems are very fixable but it's going to take one giant surge of money at some point which will probably happen when the Silver Line opens. People will have to pony up or have fun watching the nation's second most important transit system crash and burn.

This doesn't even include the fact that there are no extra tracks on Metro which was an unacceptable design flaw. One messed up train can kill a line.

On a side note I love using my Dad's metro cards from like 1985.

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Gotta agree. Especially after riding the Boston T for almost 8 months Metro is so far behind with their service it's a joke.

They keep putting band-aids on a major problem. They need to cut the poor workers and really start offering a better product worth their $$.

I use to always metro into DC for work and Caps games. Now I prefer to pay.

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This doesn't even include the fact that there are no extra tracks on Metro which was an unacceptable design flaw. One messed up train can kill a line.

I was wondering if you guys had extra tracks - thanks for clarifying. It is a huge problem - we have the same setup here in Boston and one problem on a line can stop things for hours. I previously lived in NYC and because there were two sets of tracks in each direction, there were minimal delays due to medical emergencies, malfunctions, etc. I miss that.

Can your design flaw be fixed? Ours can't without a major overhaul.

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WMATA has something like a $150 million budget shortfall. Yet people complain about the lack of improvements while simultaneously refusing to accept cuts in services and condemning the fare hikes. What exactly do you expect Metro to do? Outside of starting their own money printing presses, I don't see a lot of other options.

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I tried taking metro from the Pentagon city stop to the pentagon stop. 1 stop. And it would have been the first time I had rode metro since I was a kid. So I had no idea they didn't accept $20s. And the credit card machine was down. So I asked where I could get change and they said I would have to go all the way back to the mall and buy something to get change! I just walked to the Pentagon. I was shocked at how crappy of a system it had become.

When did you do this, 1998? The Pentagon City stop has something like six fare card machines that take credit cards.

Out of curiosity, what lines are y'all taking? I'm wondering how they compare with the frequency of delays. I mostly use the yellow and blue lines and they're pretty consistent. The orange apparently had some sort of problem last night, but it didn't affect my blue train.

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WMATA has something like a $150 million budget shortfall. Yet people complain about the lack of improvements while simultaneously refusing to accept cuts in services and condemning the fare hikes. What exactly do you expect Metro to do? Outside of starting their own money printing presses, I don't see a lot of other options.

Metro is squeezing everything they can out of their fares yet nothing improves. Trains still breakdown and make people late everyday, escalators continue to be nonoperational for months and months, the A/C doesn't work in 30 percent of the cars etc.

I'm not an economics expert and I don't know why metro has such a huge budget shortfall but don't pretend to be surprised that people are pissed that they are being charged more and more money for lesser service and a crumbling infrastructure.

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When did you do this, 1998? The Pentagon City stop has something like six fare card machines that take credit cards.

Out of curiosity, what lines are y'all taking? I'm wondering how they compare with the frequency of delays. I mostly use the yellow and blue lines and they're pretty consistent. The orange apparently had some sort of problem last night, but it didn't affect my blue train.

I take the red and yellow lines, the red line is almost always the culprit of delays.

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I was wondering if you guys had extra tracks - thanks for clarifying. It is a huge problem - we have the same setup here in Boston and one problem on a line can stop things for hours. I previously lived in NYC and because there were two sets of tracks in each direction, there were minimal delays due to medical emergencies, malfunctions, etc. I miss that.

Can your design flaw be fixed? Ours can't without a major overhaul.

Yeah I go to NU and sometimes the Green Line service is just very questionable. But Metro >> The T. It is so much more modern, cleaner and the trains have more seats. But The T has more character.

I went to NYC back in September 2000 and their subway is awesome. There's no way they could get away with not having extra tracks though considering 4 million people ride the subway there a day.

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Out of curiosity, what lines are y'all taking? I'm wondering how they compare with the frequency of delays. I mostly use the yellow and blue lines and they're pretty consistent. The orange apparently had some sort of problem last night, but it didn't affect my blue train.

The yellow/blue are the two least busy lines in the system. The orange and red run at near capacity even with the expansion to 8 car trains at rush hour, hence more delays on those lines.

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When did you do this, 1998? The Pentagon City stop has something like six fare card machines that take credit cards.

Out of curiosity, what lines are y'all taking? I'm wondering how they compare with the frequency of delays. I mostly use the yellow and blue lines and they're pretty consistent. The orange apparently had some sort of problem last night, but it didn't affect my blue train.

I know when I use to ride metro into DC everyday for work (from Dunn Loring to Farragut West) there would be at least one instance a week if not more where everyone would have to get off the train and load onto another.

Always during rush hour ... always a pain in the ass.

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But Metro >> The T. It is so much more modern, cleaner and the trains have more seats. But The T has more character.

And arguably more convenience.

Both do what their respective cities ask them to do.

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The yellow/blue are the two least busy lines in the system. The orange and red run at near capacity even with the expansion to 8 car trains at rush hour, hence more delays on those lines.

That would explain a lot of it. I don't know the statistics for which are the worst. I just know that the orange line is crowded as balls - that's right, as balls - during rush hour.

Of course, that's no different than any other major subway line in the country.

EDIT: Completely random question, but I figure it has enough relevance to daily commutes to post it here - what exactly is the real height limit for DC buildings, especially residential ones? We've all heard about the Washington Monument thing, but I have to imagine that the city's building codes are actually much more restrictive, because we could pack a lot more people into the District itself if developers could actually get anywhere close to the monument's height.

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EDIT: Completely random question, but I figure it has enough relevance to daily commutes to post it here - what exactly is the real height limit for DC buildings, especially residential ones? We've all heard about the Washington Monument thing, but I have to imagine that the city's building codes are actually much more restrictive, because we could pack a lot more people into the District itself if developers could actually get anywhere close to the monument's height.

Found this from 2006:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/30/AR2006063001316.html

And here's what Wiki has to say about it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Downtown_Washington,_D.C.#Height_restriction

Height restriction

Unlike other large cities in the U.S., Washington's downtown has a low skyline. With the advent of the skyscraper and the construction of the Cairo Hotel, residents were concerned that the city's European feel might be dwarfed by high-rise buildings. Congress therefore passed the Heights of Buildings Act in 1899, restricting any new building in Washington from exceeding the height of the U.S. Capitol. The act was amended in 1910 to allow buildings to be 20 feet (6 m) higher than the width of the adjacent street.[2]

As of 2006[update], the tallest building in downtown Washington – excluding the Washington Monument, U.S. Capitol, Washington National Cathedral, and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, all of which are outside of the downtown district – is the Old Post Office, whose 315-foot-tall (96 m) clock tower looms far above the other nearby structures. Built in 1899, it was grandfathered past the Heights of Buildings Act. The tallest commercial building is One Franklin Square at 210 feet (64 m).[3]

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That would explain a lot of it. I don't know the statistics for which are the worst. I just know that the orange line is crowded as balls - that's right, as balls - during rush hour.

Of course, that's no different than any other major subway line in the country.

EDIT: Completely random question, but I figure it has enough relevance to daily commutes to post it here - what exactly is the real height limit for DC buildings, especially residential ones? We've all heard about the Washington Monument thing, but I have to imagine that the city's building codes are actually much more restrictive, because we could pack a lot more people into the District itself if developers could actually get anywhere close to the monument's height.

It has to do with the Capitol actually I think.

And yes, the orange line is the 2nd busiest line in the system. The Red line is #1.

The busiest stations in the system are in no order:

Union Station (this is 1st)

Metro Center

Rosslyn

Farragut North and West

Hence why the Orange/Red are by FAR the busiest lines.

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