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WP: In preparation for World Cup, the poor in Cape Town are being relocated


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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/10/AR2010061002060.html

The impoverished have been victimized in other countries that have held global sporting events. At the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the 1988 Seoul Olympics, hundreds of thousands were forced from their homes. But unlike anywhere else in the world, evictions have a historical significance in South Africa. Under white rule, hundreds of thousands of blacks and so-called coloreds, or people of mixed race, were forcibly removed from their homes to racially separate the society.

One of the most famous upheavals unfolded in Cape Town's District Six. More than 60,000 people were uprooted after the government declared it a whites-only area in 1966. After the historic all-race elections in 1994, the ruling African National Congress promised to build a house for every poor family to redress the injustices of apartheid. But today, cities such as Cape Town face acute housing shortages, pushing the poor to squat on public land or occupy empty buildings, even sidewalks.

Wary of their tortured history, Cape Town officials describe Blikkiesdorp -- erected two years ago for people illegally occupying buildings -- as "a temporary relocation area" until proper housing can be built. "We acknowledge that Blikkiesdorp is not a perfect solution, but it is what we can do with the existing resources," said Kylie Hatton, a city council spokeswoman. But nobody, she said, has been "deliberately cleansed" from a neighborhood because of the World Cup.

Kylie, you are full of :bsflag:
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FIFA has also contractually demanded a commercial zone solely for its sponsors around venues, raising the ire of street vendors.

Hey FIFA, you wanna be useful, get rid of those damn vuvuzelas.

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I'm real interested to see what Brazil does with the favelas for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. They're either gonna bomb them or build a giant wall around them. I don't see what other options they have. I don't know what crime is like in South Africa but I gotta think it's gonna be war if they try to evict people in Brazil.

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I'm real interested to see what Brazil does with the favelas for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. They're either gonna bomb them or build a giant wall around them. I don't see what other options they have. I don't know what crime is like in South Africa but I gotta think it's gonna be war if they try to evict people in Brazil.

So, for the uneducated... what's a favela?

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I'm real interested to see what Brazil does with the favelas for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. They're either gonna bomb them or build a giant wall around them. I don't see what other options they have. I don't know what crime is like in South Africa but I gotta think it's gonna be war if they try to evict people in Brazil.

city-of-god.jpg

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I'm real interested to see what Brazil does with the favelas for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. They're either gonna bomb them or build a giant wall around them. I don't see what other options they have. I don't know what crime is like in South Africa but I gotta think it's gonna be war if they try to evict people in Brazil.

Crime is terrible in South Africa. Johanessburg was, not sure if it still is, the murder capital of the world.

Unfortunately, these days, a lot of the crime is black on white, payback for apartheid :( At least this is what I've been told by several colleagues and friends who are South African.

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Crime is terrible in South Africa. Johanessburg was, not sure if it still is, the murder capital of the world.

Unfortunately, these days, a lot of the crime is black on white, payback for apartheid :( At least this is what I've been told by several colleagues and friends who are South African.

My wife is South African. She's said the same thing as well.

Remember it took us a long time to largely get over the wrongs of the past, and in our case it was the majority oppressing a minority. When the majority realizes they were in the wrong, there isn't as easy a road for "payback" from the minority (since they are still the minority, even if they are not oppressed anymore).

In the other case, there is of course a big danger. Apartheid ended finally for a variety of reasons, and one of the main ones was the global condemnation of the actions of the ruling minority. Now, we are not even 20 years after the end of apartheid; in the US, 20 years after the Civil War, we still had plenty of problems in our own society adjusting to the new realities.

As for the article, this is always going to happen when a country gets on the world stage (China did it for their Olympic bid to a very large extent themselves). It's all about presenting "the best view" to the world, and anyone who doesn't expect/know it's going to happen in any country is deluding themselves. Every country will do what they feel they have to, to ensure that the best possible "foot forward" is placed to the international audience.

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