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Unit Rankings: Coaches and coordinators - TSN


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There's just no way to sugarcoat this turd.

Exclusive Analysis

by

The War Room

TSN

Unit Rankings: Coaches and coordinators

Ranking the NFL's best coaches and coordinators:

Head coaches

1. Bill Parcells, Cowboys. The man who has led two organizations to the Super Bowl takes on a new challenge in Dallas. Parcells gets results quickly and knows how to get the most out of players.

2. Jon Gruden, Buccaneers. Gruden has led his last three teams -- Raiders (2000-2001) and Buccaneers (2002) -- to division titles and last season became the youngest coach to win a Super Bowl.

3. Jeff Fisher, Titans. Best known for his aggressive defenses, Fisher led the Titans to the AFC championship game last year despite a 1-4 start.

4. Andy Reid, Eagles. Reid has led the Eagles to the last two NFC championship games. He did it last year without Donovan McNabb for the final six regular-season games.

5. Dick Vermeil, Chiefs. His players work hard for him, his teams generally play with great discipline, and the Chiefs have steadily improved the last two seasons.

6. Bill Cowher, Steelers. Cowher led the Steelers to the playoffs in each of his first six seasons as coach and has taken them to four AFC championship games and one Super Bowl.

7. Brian Billick, Ravens. Although cap casualties decimated the roster and Ray Lewis missed most of last season, Billick had the Ravens in playoff contention.

Offensive coordinators

1. Brad Childress, Eagles. Reid justifiably gets a lot of credit, but Childress' contributions shouldn't be overlooked. He has helped turn McNabb into one of the league's best quarterbacks.

2. Mike Mularkey, Steelers. Since Mularkey took over two years ago, the Steelers' offense has evolved from a power running attack into a relatively wide-open passing scheme. He keeps opponents off-balance with gadget plays.

3. Norv Turner, Dolphins. Turner's schemes spread the ball around. He uses several formations and makes great adjustments.

4. Tom Moore, Colts. Moore's offense uses the run to set up Peyton Manning's great play-action packages. Moore throws a variety of different personnel groups at defenses.

5. Marc Trestman, Raiders. In Trestman's first season as Oakland's coordinator, the Raiders finished first in the league in total offense and passing offense.

Defensive coordinators

1. Monte Kiffin, Buccaneers. Under Kiffin, the godfather of the cover 2 scheme, the Buccaneers have finished third, second, third, ninth, sixth and first in total defense over the last six seasons.

2. Jim Johnson, Eagles. Johnson's defense forces quarterbacks into costly mistakes by blitzing constantly and bringing pressure from all over the field.

3. Ray Rhodes, Seahawks. During Rhodes' six seasons as a coordinator, his units have finished below the top 10 in total defense just once.

4. Tim Lewis, Steelers. The Steelers led the league in run defense in each of the last two years and do an excellent job of getting to quarterbacks.

5. Jim Bates, Dolphins. The Dolphins have one of the strongest pass defenses in the league. Bates' corners apply aggressive man-to-man coverage that results in plenty of turnovers.

The War Room, a team of football scouts headed by Gary Horton, analyzes NFL and college players, coaches and teams exclusively for the Sporting News.

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Norv Turner, Dolphins. Turner's schemes spread the ball around. He uses several formations and makes great adjustments.

Yeah, like repeatedly passing the ball when you are up late in a game with the league's leading rusher and you are inside you own 20 yard line...I guess they just didn't execute well that day.

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And Gruden deserves to be recognized as one of the league's best, for taking Dungy's team to the big one?

Granted, Dungey didn't get them there, but isn't this a little like congratulating Switzer for winning the big one in his rookie season?

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Originally posted by Larry

And Gruden deserves to be recognized as one of the league's best, for taking Dungy's team to the big one?

Granted, Dungey didn't get them there, but isn't this a little like congratulating Switzer for winning the big one in his rookie season?

Was it his first season? I thought it was his 2nd.

Either way, he won with a team that had already won twice. Gruden won with a team that had been contending for years without ever being able to get over the hump. Jon also came close with the Raiders before he got tucked by the refs.

I am surprised at a couple of those names being listed ahead of Dan Reeves. 4 Super Bowl apperances and he's got a contending team again. Andy Reid, for example, doesn't measure up. I guess I'm not that surprised, Reeves never gets much credit or praise.

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How in the world is Philly's offensive coordinator ranked ahead of the guy from the Raiders who led them to the top offense in the league in his first season???

Philly runs about the most bland, conservative offense in the league, nothing but screen passes, five yard curls and McNabb taking off when things are covered and that's the best offensive coordinator in the league??? Oh wow, he developed McNabb, a former #3 overall pick, is that really that impressive???

AND... Parcells hasn't coached one down in Dallas and he's annointed the best coach in the league???

Good Christ, this is about the worst, most blatantly partisan analysis I've ever read. BOOO, I say, BOOOOOOO!

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Originally posted by MAP16

BOOO, I say, BOOOOOOO!

You'd fit right in with an Eagles crowd. :D

And I do agree with most of your points. Let's first see what Parcells does before anointing him the best of the current coaches.

Another point is that if Reid would get out of the way, Childress would take the Eagles to new heights on offense. It's Reid's playcalling that mystifies people. Still, they somehow managed 420 points last year, a franchise record, with McNabb out 6 games. Even though it is so bland and boring, it seems to rack up the points.

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Oddly, I think Reid's playcalling/coaching does a great job of compensating for limited QBs, but conversely is holding McNabb back. Reminds me of when Ray Rhodes came to Philly and destroyed Cunnigham's career. Dennis Green could work wonders with Philly's offense, while Reid probably could've gotten something more out of our Gatorskins last year. While Jim Johnson is a terrific playcaller during the regular season, for some incomprehensible reason, he becomes Mr. Conservative when the playoffs arrive. I don't get it, though I must admit I'm grateful for it :D

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Riggo-Toni,

I'd love to see McNabb winging the ball downfield in more of an open offense. The dink and dunk of the WCO can be efficient, but doesn't play to McNabb's strength. His weakest pass is the screen/dump off/short pass.

MAP,

Yes, he just advises Reid. Childress is an excellent coach and has been rumored for head coaching jobs, but you're right - at this point mentioning him as a top OC is a stretch. Also, will Spurrier let his OC call the plays? I don't really think so.

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