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    • By Destino in ES Coverage
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      The home team fans are at home, these games no longer matter, and it’s probably better for the team to lose than it is to win.  It must be December in Washington.  Welcome to week 15!
       
      Redskins Inactive: 
      Colt McCoy  
      Trey Quinn 
      Quinton Dunbar  
      Josh Harvey-Clemons  
      Ross Pierschbacher  
      Brandon Scherff  
      Caleb Wilson  
       
      Eagles Inactive: 
      Nate Sudfeld  
      Nelson Agholor 
      Jordan Howard  
      Shareef Miller 
      Lane Johnson  
      Sua Opeta  
      Derek Barnet
       
      There are two camps for Redskins fans at this time of year.  Those that want to tank and those that want to win.  If this describes you, I want you to know something important. You’re wrong.  You should probably feel bad about it too, but that’s your business.  The right way to go about this, is simply to embrace the double think.  
      Before and after the game it’s perfectly reasonable to acknowledge that losing has its advantages.  It does and it is undeniable.  Afterall we could be talking about the difference between Chase Young being in a Redskins uniform, or not.  What we need for that to happen is simple.  Redskins lose out.  Giants beat the Dolphins and Redskins.  Dolphins beat the Bengals.  All of these things are perfectly reasonable outcomes.  We’re that close to having an elite pass rusher.   
       
      Before that happens, we have a game to play.  It is in this moment that we should embrace the other side of our demented double think.  While the game is being played, especially against a division opponent, fans should want their team to do well.  Assuming they have a soul and any decency.  There is just no way that I can root for the Eagles to beat the Redskins during a game.  If you are the type of fan that does this, I hope you find someone that can fix what has broken inside of you.   
       
      Pregame Prediction:  Redskins 23 – Eagles 30  
      More interesting game we are missing because we are still watching the Redskins:  Packers – Bears  
      Things I am snacking on:  Brownie.   
      Number of colons used:  Six.  (so far)  
       
      Check back for updates.  I’m going to wander around the room for a while and stretch my legs to get away from a certain well-known ESPN Eagle fan’s boring conversations that my ear phones aren’t blocking out entirely.
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

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FrFan

USAT:"Haynesworth sharpens NFC East plan of attack for Redskins" [please merge]

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Haynesworth sharpens NFC East plan of attack for Redskins.

by Nate Davis, USA TODAY

ASHBURN, Va. — Washington is home to a cutting-edge defense industry that constantly looks to deploy the latest in game-changing weaponry.

It's a similar story at Redskins Park.

In 2008, the Washington Redskins fielded a heavily fortified defense that finished fourth in yards allowed (288.8 a game) while allowing the sixth-fewest points (18.5 a game). Yet staunch as it was, the defense wasn't necessarily a weapon. Two teams had fewer takeaways than the Redskins' 18, and their 24 sacks ranked last in the NFC.

Enter defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth, perhaps the NFL's best practitioner of trench warfare.

"Whenever you have the great tackles inside, it makes your defense better," Redskins defensive coordinator Greg Blache says. "They give you something special — they're like artillery."

Haynesworth, 28, an all-pro the past two seasons with the Tennessee Titans, was lured out of Nashville in February when the Redskins made him their marquee free agent acquisition with a seven-year, $100 million deal ($41 million guaranteed).

Haynesworth provides most of his artillery from short range. Last season he spearheaded the Titans' sixth-ranked run defense and recorded a career-best 8½ sacks. He's also a long-range disruptor. His pocket-crushing presence was a major reason the Titans picked off 20 passes while generating 31 turnovers, tied for third-most in the NFL.

"Albert will have a dramatic impact," second-year Redskins coach Jim Zorn says. "It may not be seen in tackles or sacks, but it is going to be seen in how an offense prepares for us.

"You are going to see other guys making plays, and you're going to think they are having a great year. But some of that is going to be Albert creating problems on the line of scrimmage."

Feeling little pressure to justify his contract, Haynesworth plans to let his play speak for itself.

"I'm not a talker," he says. "I just go out there and play. And if you put me in a leadership role because of the way I play, then so be it. But I'm not going to go out there and hooh-rah and all that."

But Haynesworth knows defensive end Andre Carter, the team's top pass rusher in each of the last three seasons, might be doing some "hooh-rahs."

"I draw a lot of double-teams, sometimes triple-teams — depends on how I'm playing. Andre could get free from it," Haynesworth says. "But the way I do play, it helps everybody else's numbers go up."

After notching 10½ sacks in 2007, Carter had four last year. But teams will be hard-pressed to focus on him. Not only is Haynesworth on board, run-stuffing defensive end Phillip Daniels— a key to the unit's success, according to Blache — returns from a torn knee ligament that cost him all of 2008.

Then there's first-rounder Brian Orakpo, a defensive end at Texas. The Redskins are converting him into a strong-side linebacker, though he will likely be turned loose on quarterbacks on passing downs.

For a team that got little from Jason Taylor, who toiled at the unfamiliar left end post in the Redskins' 4-3 set in 2008, there seems to be little concern that Orakpo might also be out of his comfort zone.

"As he gets the concepts down, he has really been able to make himself play the linebacker position the way (coaches) want," Zorn says. "I think we are pleasantly surprised he's been a quick study."

Teammates rave about the play-making ability of Orakpo, who's adapting to his role.

"Still getting acclimated," the rookie says, admitting he has new mind-sets and skills to master, such as how to cover the likes of Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl tight end Jason Witten.

"That's a huge challenge," Orakpo says. "I'm going to have a lot on my hands."

It looks like a make or break season. There will be a lot of pressure on Haynesworth to be the expected disruptive force and will have a snowball effect on the DE unit. Same pressure on coach Zorn, JC and the rookie class WRs, they all must deliver unless ...., well I don't want to think about it.

Hail

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I think you're right. The D seems to have a little bit of an edge with Fat Albert in the middle. He brings the nasty that the D seemed to have lost when Sean Taylor was killed. I'm looking forward to the D-line and our defense in general this season.

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I think you're right. The D seems to have a little bit of an edge with Fat Albert in the middle. He brings the nasty that the D seemed to have lost when Sean Taylor was killed. I'm looking forward to the D-line and our defense in general this season.

That's a good point that I hadn't really thought about. Haynesworth (depending on how it works out) is the turning of the page from the ST tragedy. Last year and a half was about ST and what a horrible loss that was and now it's about Haynesworth. Not just on D, or on the team, but for the franchise and the fans.

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With little investment in the offense this off season, I'm thinking they are expecting a return from the defense scoring points. :helmet:

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With little investment in the offense this off season, I'm thinking they are expecting a return from the defense scoring points. :helmet:

Yep, and the offense should be playing with a shorter field, due to improved field position from turnovers and stops.

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http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/redskins/2009-08-02-defense-changes_N.htm

Haynesworth sharpens NFC East plan of attack for Redskins

By Nate Davis, USA TODAY

ASHBURN, Va. — Washington is home to a cutting-edge defense industry that constantly looks to deploy the latest in game-changing weaponry.

It's a similar story at Redskins Park.

In 2008, the Washington Redskins fielded a heavily fortified defense that finished fourth in yards allowed (288.8 a game) while allowing the sixth-fewest points (18.5 a game). Yet staunch as it was, the defense wasn't necessarily a weapon. Two teams had fewer takeaways than the Redskins' 18, and their 24 sacks ranked last in the NFC.

Enter defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth, perhaps the NFL's best practitioner of trench warfare.

"Whenever you have the great tackles inside, it makes your defense better," Redskins defensive coordinator Greg Blache says. "They give you something special — they're like artillery."

Haynesworth, 28, an all-pro the past two seasons with the Tennessee Titans, was lured out of Nashville in February when the Redskins made him their marquee free agent acquisition with a seven-year, $100 million deal ($41 million guaranteed).

Haynesworth provides most of his artillery from short range. Last season he spearheaded the Titans' sixth-ranked run defense and recorded a career-best 8½ sacks. He's also a long-range disruptor. His pocket-crushing presence was a major reason the Titans picked off 20 passes while generating 31 turnovers, tied for third-most in the NFL.

"Albert will have a dramatic impact," second-year Redskins coach Jim Zorn says. "It may not be seen in tackles or sacks, but it is going to be seen in how an offense prepares for us.

"You are going to see other guys making plays, and you're going to think they are having a great year. But some of that is going to be Albert creating problems on the line of scrimmage."

Feeling little pressure to justify his contract, Haynesworth plans to let his play speak for itself.

"I'm not a talker," he says. "I just go out there and play. And if you put me in a leadership role because of the way I play, then so be it. But I'm not going to go out there and hooh-rah and all that."

But Haynesworth knows defensive end Andre Carter, the team's top pass rusher in each of the last three seasons, might be doing some "hooh-rahs."

"I draw a lot of double-teams, sometimes triple-teams — depends on how I'm playing. Andre could get free from it," Haynesworth says. "But the way I do play, it helps everybody else's numbers go up."

After notching 10½ sacks in 2007, Carter had four last year. But teams will be hard-pressed to focus on him. Not only is Haynesworth on board, run-stuffing defensive end Phillip Daniels— a key to the unit's success, according to Blache — returns from a torn knee ligament that cost him all of 2008.

Then there's first-rounder Brian Orakpo, a defensive end at Texas. The Redskins are converting him into a strong-side linebacker, though he will likely be turned loose on quarterbacks on passing downs.

For a team that got little from Jason Taylor, who toiled at the unfamiliar left end post in the Redskins' 4-3 set in 2008, there seems to be little concern that Orakpo might also be out of his comfort zone.

"As he gets the concepts down, he has really been able to make himself play the linebacker position the way (coaches) want," Zorn says. "I think we are pleasantly surprised he's been a quick study."

Teammates rave about the play-making ability of Orakpo, who's adapting to his role.

"Still getting acclimated," the rookie says, admitting he has new mind-sets and skills to master, such as how to cover the likes of Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl tight end Jason Witten.

"That's a huge challenge," Orakpo says. "I'm going to have a lot on my hands."

[/Quote]

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OK, someone explain this.

Haynesworth: draws double teams.

That still leaves one OL for the remaining 3 DL.

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OOps sorry mods someone beat me around the corner on this one, please merge, thank you.

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OK, someone explain this.

Haynesworth: draws double teams.

That still leaves one OL for the remaining 3 DL.

But it usually leaves everybody else in one-on-one matchups. Guys like Carter get paid to win their share of one-on-one matchups.

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OK, someone explain this.

Haynesworth: draws double teams.

That still leaves one OL for the remaining 3 DL.

Well, a receiver one on one against a cornerback or safety is considered to have the advantage. He just needs to run his route and look for the ball when expected. The cornerback, on the other hand, has to follow the wide receiver while also preventing the ball from reaching the receiver - both requiring the cornerback's eyes. One on one, the aggressor has the advantage. The reason is that it only takes one play to shift the game.

A defensive end can be shut down for the entire game except for one play. However, that one play can change the game (forcing an errant throw leading to an interception, a fumble recovered by the defense, or even a sack that takes the opposing offense out of field goal range, making them punt). If any of the mentioned occur from the defensive end's play, he's done his job.

Haynesworth can't make people get sacks. However, he can make their chances much better. Last year, Carter was double teamed a lot. Put in another pass rusher (Phillip Daniels in the middle, Orakpo or Wilson opposite to Carter) and you've got a one on one matchup. Also, don't forget that we do blitz. That can bring an extra man or two making Carter AND Haynesworth go one on one. ;)

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But it usually leaves everybody else in one-on-one matchups. Guys like Carter get paid to win their share of one-on-one matchups.
Ah. That makes sense. Or maybe it could free up 'Rak when he's LB?

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I'm hoping I haven't missed some huge news about him not playing in washington, but I have not heard one word about Cornelius Griffin. With Albert next to him, they will snack on RBs all day.

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