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Putting People In Positions To Be Successful: The Big Picture Why We Are Only 8-8


McD5

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"The key to successful management is to put people in the best position to succeed. After that, just sit back and let them do what they do best."

Jack Welch, legendary former GE ceo who took a company worth $14 billion, and made it worth $410 billion.

Forget high-priced free agents, top draft picks and who is our best quarterback. Our problems are much bigger than that.

Without someone in the organization who understands management, we will never be anything but 8-8. Mediocre in good years; awful in bad years.

From the coaches to the players to the play-calling, this franchise is a textbook example of exactly how NOT to run a professional organization. It doesn't matter if it is a sports franchise, a sales franchise, or an international conglomerate like GE.

Exhibit 1: Portis blasts the head coach on the radio. Dan and Vinny hide in silence, instead of vocally backing up the Head Coach. No suspensions are given, and no apologies are offered by the offender. Instead, a precedent of tolerance for blasting the Head Coach has now been set.

The coach no longer has control of the locker room. Zorn meet your twin, Wade Phillips. Wade, meet Zorn. Neither of you have the respect or fear of your players, courtesy of the Front Office. Future seasons have already been damaged.

No coach can succeed in that position.

Exhibit 2: How Portis is used. Not only do we want him to run himself into the ground, so that he is physically destroyed by the time the playoffs come around, but we want him to block too.

Really? Our star RB? The guy we want running and catching touchdowns? We want him to get even more banged up blocking?

Did Barry Sanders block? Does AD block? Does Ladanian block? What about Michael Turner?

Dan's absolute lack of football knowledge, and even more importantly, his lack of management understanding, places Portis in a position where he cannot best serve this team--by running and receiving. This is a ditto for Chris Cooley. We don't need Cooley blocking on third down, rather than running down the field to get open. Right Tackle for 700, Alex?

Dan and Vinny's total lack of building the offensive line is the reason why our best offensive weapons have their hands tied.

Neither Portis nor Cooley have been put into a position to help us succeed.

Exhibit 3: Jason Campbell, or any other qb for this franchise. Our qbs don't need us wasting draft picks on wrs with degenerative knee conditions. We also don't need another tight end to back up our pro bowler.

It doesn't matter how many great receivers we have--if we don't have a line to block for them, we could have Jerry Rice and Randy Moss and still not win games.

JC, Todd Collins in the Seattle game, and any future qb we have here, are simply not put into a position where they have a great chance of succeeding.

So when you watch the Redskins in this upcoming season, evalutate what you see on the field, and ask yourself if talent and execution are the problems.....or whether anyone on the team has even been placed in the best position to help us succeed. Once we stop beating ourselves, maybe we can begin beating our opponents.

:logo:

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I agree with the notion but not for your reasons. I don't think Portis should have to practice. To this end I think point number 1 conflicts with point number 2. We don't need portis to practice, Portis doesn't want to practice but wants to play and can play well without practicing. The head coach feels he should practice then sits Portis during key drives.

So if we do not want to run "Portis into the ground" we should let him put his ability where its most needed, on the field not the practice field. The coach should want to put Portis in games with as little wear and tear as possible which means light practice.

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I also agree with the notions but not the reasons you gave. Play calling is one of the biggest ways of putting players in position to be successful. If you call a bad play, you put them in a position where they have to make an amazing play just to break even. If your play calling is predictable it puts your players in a bad position.

Teams like the Patriots and the Giants have been so successful in recent years because of putting players in a position to succeed. I remember the second Giants game last year and how that offense waltzed over us. They did it because players were in such good positions, they would have been successful no matter how badly they played on a particular play. A good coach can make do with lesser players because he can put them in good positions. A bad coach can fail with superstars because he cant put them in the right positions. I really do think the importance of coaching takes a backseat to players in the NFL(in the minds of fans at least), partly because its always a big deal, and involves a lot of money, when a player signs. There is a draft for players not for coaches. Most fans don't care who the DB coach is, yet he may be pivotal for the success of the pass defense.

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I also agree with the notions but not the reasons you gave. I really do think the importance of coaching takes a backseat to players in the NFL(in the minds of fans at least), partly because its always a big deal, and involves a lot of money, when a player signs. There is a draft for players not for coaches. Most fans don't care who the DB coach is, yet he may be pivotal for the success of the pass defense.

These are only a few examples. Your citing of coaching is another.

Who are our wide receivers learning from? Who is assigned the task of working with them daily, both on routes and the playbook?

Who is responsible when they aren't learning the playbook, and when they can't be trusted to run a few simple routes?

Stan Hixon.

Does having Stan Hixon on the roster give our receivers the best chance to succeed?

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I agree with most of the thread. I began a thread several days ago about KNEE JERK reactions, which explains most of Danny's bad decisions.

But firing Marty, Spurrier basically, and because Gibbs quit, and Zorn is on the hotseat, I am afraid Bill Cower just laughs at the notion of coming to Washington D.C. although it remains a possiblity if Danny is willing to shell out the first 50 million dollar contract for a head coach. (and he might)

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The premise of this thread is exactly correct but you are wrong about barry Sanders and other top running backs NOT blocking.

LT blocks on passing downs. Barry did it as well. Even Marshall Faulk blocked plenty for the greatest show on turf. So you're wrong about that, but the rest is pretty much spot on.

I can think of worse things the organization has done than make CP a blocker. In reality this is football which requires blocking, even from TE's, RBs and WRs.:doh:

Alas, I digress. This in no way takes away from Snyder's ineptness as a manager.

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A few things to point out:

1. Tiki Barber called out Tom Coughlan a couple of times. Neither of those times caused any sort of suspension or the FO rushing out to support him. Tom is also one of the most hard-nosed coaches out there. I'm also wondering where the evidence that he's lost the team. Other than Portis' comments (which he has made similar ones under Gibbs), it seems like everyone is still behind the coach.

2. All running backs have to block at some point, if just to pick up blitzes. There probably is more focus on Portis' blocking because he happens to be damn good at it.

3. If you are going to point the finger at someone for not drafting OL in recent years, it would have to be at Gibbs and probably to a lesser extent Bugel, since Gibbs signed off on the trades that left us light at the top of the draft. Had we not wasted picks on Lloyd and Duckett, maybe we would have drafted Dock's replacement that year.

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Great post. I didn't understand the pick of Fred Davis when we made it. He's a fine player by we had other needs at the time like O-line and DE.

Yep.

I think I read that since Antonio Smith left via free agency that Calais Campbell will start at DE this year for the Cards.

While the Skins will have a back up TE who will play 5-10 plays a game at most. How many 2 TE sets are they planning to run?

I wonder if we took CC last year if we would still have a second rounder this year?

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"The key to successful management is to put people in the best position to succeed. After that, just sit back and let them do what they do best."

Jack Welch, legendary former GE ceo who took a company worth $14 billion, and made it worth $410 billion.

Dan's absolute lack of football knowledge, and even more importantly, his lack of management understanding,

:logo:

Did you really just suggest that Dan has no understanding of management? Did he not build a multi-billion dollar corporation? Or did he get wealthy by blind luck. Normally, I would let this go, but you built a thread on the basis of a very good business man not undersatnding the basics of business. Absolutely ludicrous.

Dan will never be mistaken for a football genius. I will not argue that. But he is a very good businessman, as evidenced by his growth of revenue and ability to profit off, by your own words, a marginal product. That, in and of itself, demonstrates his unreal understanding of business and management.

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Did you really just suggest that Dan has no understanding of management? Did he not build a multi-billion dollar corporation? Or did he get wealthy by blind luck. Normally, I would let this go, but you built a thread on the basis of a very good business man not undersatnding the basics of business. Absolutely ludicrous.

Dan will never be mistaken for a football genius. I will not argue that. But he is a very good businessman, as evidenced by his growth of revenue and ability to profit off, by your own words, a marginal product. That, in and of itself, demonstrates his unreal understanding of business and management.

I have to say, you make a very good point.

That probably wasn't a good premise to build your argument on OP.

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I agree with everything on this thread except for Portis blocking. Part of the reason he's as good as he is is because of his willingness to assist in blocking. He's on record saying he loves to block and it makes him a better player. A running back has three jobs, run the ball, catch the ball, block when your not doing the previously mentioned. In fact, now that I think about it, his willingness to block is one of his best traits. No one likes a player that's not gonna give it his all just because he's not getting the ball. One of the key ingredients to success on the football field is all 11 players doing their job each and every play. Last time I checked, a running back blocking is part of doing his job.

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Of course your #1 is Portis calling out Zorn, McD5. ;)

I'll admit I was surprised he wasn't suspended for a game.

I agree with the notion but not for your reasons. I don't think Portis should have to practice. To this end I think point number 1 conflicts with point number 2. We don't need portis to practice, Portis doesn't want to practice but wants to play and can play well without practicing. The head coach feels he should practice then sits Portis during key drives.
Dude... what????

The point here isn't so Portis doesn't have to practice, we need to catchup to the league and run a 2 back system.

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The point here isn't so Portis doesn't have to practice, we need to catchup to the league and run a 2 back system.

The only reason why we didn't last year was because of Betts getting hurt and being gimpy for most of the rest of the season. He actually was getting a decent amount of carries before the injury and was being fairly effective.

I'm hoping either Dorsey or Aldridge finds their way onto the field as well.

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Great post McD5. Most of what you said is absolutely spot on.

To be fair, I don't know how much of Portis' transition from one cut and go, speed back into a poor man's power back had to do with Gibbs 2.0 vs. the change to the realities of playing in the NFCE and later to a loss of speed and burst. It may be a mixture of all of these. However, I said from the beginning that I disagreed with Gibbs trying to turn Portis into a power back.

I don't have a problem with Portis or any other RB blocking. However, the problem isn't Portis blocking per se, rather it's that he's had to block too often. I think that's indicative of our poor OL play, early on in Gibbs' 2nd stint due to injuries and later, due to age. This makes it all too easy for opposing DCs to remove Portis from a significant number of plays by blitzing or otherwise making us worry about our QB being pressured.

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Did you really just suggest that Dan has no understanding of management? Did he not build a multi-billion dollar corporation? Or did he get wealthy by blind luck. Normally, I would let this go, but you built a thread on the basis of a very good business man not undersatnding the basics of business. Absolutely ludicrous.

Dan will never be mistaken for a football genius. I will not argue that. But he is a very good businessman, as evidenced by his growth of revenue and ability to profit off, by your own words, a marginal product. That, in and of itself, demonstrates his unreal understanding of business and management.

You're wrong. This is actually one of McD5's strongest points. I personally believe Snyder benefited greatly from the dotcom boom and cashed out at the right time into a business in which he's all but guaranteed a profit. As evidenced by his tenure as owner here, he clearly has a good handle on marketing. No big surprise given his experience with Snyder communications. However, his tenure here also shows he has no concept of strategic management, team building (both on and off field) and personnel management.

Examples?

Strategic management-As with all NFL teams, Snyder wants to win a SB. However he has shown a remarkable inability and/or unwillingness to figure out a tangible roadmap for how to get there. He has lurched back and forth between smashmouth running teams/coaches (Marty) to chuck-n-duck (SOS), and now WCO. (I don't count Gibbs 2.0 but that's another argument for another day.)

In short, it's great to want to win, but how are you going to do it? No business manager worth his salt is unable to answer that question. His answer may be wrong or have flaws, but he's able to answer it. Snyder so far, simply hasn't even attempted to answer this question.

Personnel management-As a tie-in to his lack of strategic management of the team, his personnel "strategy" is equally scattershot. If you look at our history of player aquisitions under Snyder (outside of Gibbs 2.0) it reveals the same lack of focus regarding what type of team we're trying to build and what types of players we need for that philosophy/system. See the "Knee-jerk" post for more on this.

Team building-As for off-field team building, Snyder is poor in this area as well. Perhaps given his lack of people skills, it's his biggest weakness. So for example, when he wanted to fire Norv, instead of just firing him and moving on, Snyder let him twist in the wind for hours before letting Norv know. He also has a history of getting too chummy with certain players, thus undercutting his coaches. This happened with Bruce Smith (and Peon Sanders too IIRC) just as it has with Portis. Serving as a catalyst for undercutting the authority of your coaches simply is NOT a recipe for building a winning team of coaches off the field, from the HC on down to the waterboy. Again, any manager worth his salt would know this.

I'm sorry but getting rich in the dotcom boom simply does not make one a good manager. As further evidence, Snyder's subsequent ventures (i.e. Six Flags, horny zebra or whatever his media "empire" is called etc.) have performed quite poorly, in many cases due to the same flaws with strategic management that we've seen with the Redskins. That he's able to continue to make money with the Redskins is a testament to the loyalty of the fans and the revenue sharing structure the league has in place, not Snyder's genius...unless you're referring to the Wile E. Coyote variety.

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That he's able to continue to make money with the Redskins is a testament to the loyalty of the fans and the revenue sharing structure the league has in place, not Snyder's genius...unless you're referring to the Wile E. Coyote variety.

QFT I absolutely agreed with everything you said in your post, especially this part. If the fans ever went on strike, Dan would be waiting in line in bankruptcy court. This franchise is the one of the few things that has kept him afloat IMO.

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I'm sorry but getting rich in the dotcom boom simply does not make one a good manager. As further evidence, Snyder's subsequent ventures (i.e. Six Flags, horny zebra or whatever his media "empire" is called etc.) have performed quite poorly, in many cases due to the same flaws with strategic management that we've seen with the Redskins. That he's able to continue to make money with the Redskins is a testament to the loyalty of the fans and the revenue sharing structure the league has in place, not Snyder's genius...unless you're referring to the Wile E. Coyote variety.

Care to point just exactly out how Six Flags and Red Zebra have done poorly because of "similar flaws"?

The fact he's able to continue to make money off the team is a testament to good marketing moves and a very large stadium in an area with not only a bunch of Skins fans, but other teams fans as well which attend games when we play them (like Steelers).

IMO, the biggest flaw in Snyder's tenure here has been consistency. He changes everything if things don't go smoothly in the first 2 seasons or so. It's hard to build a consistent winner in just 2 seasons. Sadly, the impatient fanbase that also screams for change if things aren't perfect from the get go doesn't help matters either.

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A few things to point out:

1. Tiki Barber called out Tom Coughlan a couple of times. Neither of those times caused any sort of suspension or the FO rushing out to support him. Tom is also one of the most hard-nosed coaches out there. I'm also wondering where the evidence that he's lost the team. Other than Portis' comments (which he has made similar ones under Gibbs), it seems like everyone is still behind the coach.

don't forget Strahan also questioned Coughlin in the press

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