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A Pastor Took Out an Ad to Shame Craft Beer — and a Local Bar Used It to Become the ‘Best Beer Bar in Texas’

 

When Pastor Todd Barker of Canyon, Texas took out a prominent newspaper ad in October 2016 that began with the words, “Craft beer is the devil’s craft,” it was a very on-brand decision. Barker is a Baptist teetotaler, and countering the evils of alcohol is a centerpiece of his ministry, and the Canyon News covered bar openings. What he likely didn’t anticipate was that the newly opened local watering hole he was targeting, the Imperial Taproom, would honor his printed ad as a coupon valued at $1 — and that this would lead the small community to embrace the bar with a vigor they might not have shown otherwise.

 

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2 hours ago, China said:

A Pastor Took Out an Ad to Shame Craft Beer — and a Local Bar Used It to Become the ‘Best Beer Bar in Texas’

 

When Pastor Todd Barker of Canyon, Texas took out a prominent newspaper ad in October 2016 that began with the words, “Craft beer is the devil’s craft,” it was a very on-brand decision. Barker is a Baptist teetotaler, and countering the evils of alcohol is a centerpiece of his ministry, and the Canyon News covered bar openings. What he likely didn’t anticipate was that the newly opened local watering hole he was targeting, the Imperial Taproom, would honor his printed ad as a coupon valued at $1 — and that this would lead the small community to embrace the bar with a vigor they might not have shown otherwise.

 

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"Devil's Craft" sounds like an awesome name for a beer or brewery.

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  • 1 month later...

Break Up Budweiser

 

And Molson Coors too. The beer industry needs trustbusting.
 

Countless industries have consolidated over the past few decades, but the number of companies brewing beer in the U.S. grew from about 100 in 1987 to more than 8,000 today. The democratization of beer, the story goes, happened because of a state-by-state regulatory system that clamped down on monopoly power in an industry where anyone with a little cash and a love for beer could join.

 

To most beer drinkers, small businesses have triumphed. Bars teem with interesting ales and stouts, and retail beer aisles seem as diverse as ever.

 

But the reality is not what it appears to be. Call it the illusion of choice—or the illusion of competition. Beer drinkers might see plenty of options, but in the multibillion-dollar beer industry, Big Beer companies, and distributors that are beholden to their power, use an unseen network of influence to restrain new, independent brewers and recapture profits that were lost in the craft boom.

 

Today, two powerful brewers continue to dominate the American beer market. Combined, Anheuser-Busch InBev and Molson Coors (called MillerCoors until this year) sell around 65 percent of all beer in the U.S. That’s about as powerful a duopoly as exists in American industry—but it’s still less than what it was 15 years ago, when 80 percent of the industry sat in the hands of the two big brewers. Myriad factors contributed to the duopoly’s slump, perhaps in particular the rise of independent craft breweries, which now account for around 12 percent of the industry.

 

Despite the popularity of craft beer, the two global beer titans have managed to maintain their grip on the industry largely by influencing how beer is distributed and what is found on store shelves. Almost 90 percent of beer sold in most places in America is handled by distributors whose primary customer is one of the two big brewers, giving AB InBev and Molson Coors outsize control over which beers appear on bar taps and in retail coolers. Meanwhile, the two companies have purchased about 20 smaller “craft” beer brands—brands that then fill taps and shelves where independent brews might otherwise appear.

 

The pandemic has bludgeoned the beer industry overall. As of May, sales at craft breweries were down 30 percent—nearly identical to the 32 percent drop in sales AB InBev reported for April. The difference: AB InBev says it is dealing with the shortfall by cutting its investor dividends, which were nearly $1 billion last year, and freezing corporate travel and facility renovations. Meanwhile, craft brewers report feeling anxious about their future and, in some cases, preparing to close for good.

 

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The big beer companies have gotten slick with their purchase of craft breweries. 

 

The good think is that probably 90% of the craft beer I drink comes from local places. Union, Denizens, Flying Dog, Peabody Heights, DC Brau, 7 Locks, Jailbreak, Heavy Seas, Port City... 

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Aluminum can shortage threatens Minnesota's craft brewers

 

In his dream to become a craft brewer, Tom Berg never thought he’d have to worry much about the lowly aluminum can.

 

That is, finding cans to package — and sell — the signature craft beer produced at Falling Knife Brewing Co., the northeast Minneapolis brewery and taproom that Berg opened with two buddies last year.

 

Cans were in short supply across the country even before the COVID-19 outbreak this spring, but as bars, restaurants and taprooms shuttered and Minnesotans hunkered down to sip some suds, a mad scramble for aluminum has resulted.

 

this “The bigger breweries have a tendency to hoard stuff; they’re probably sitting on pallets and pallets of cans,” Berg explained. “We kind of buy to order, because we don’t have the warehouse space. If we can’t find any cans, we’re totally up the river.”

 

While it’s likely consumers can still find their favorite brew at the store or taproom, the aluminum supply chain shortfall could have a profound long-term effect on Minnesota’s beloved craft brewing industry. At least one brewery has closed because of economic fallout from the pandemic, said Lauren Bennett McGinty, executive director of the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild.

 

Put simply, if brewers can’t package and sell their product — whether in cans, bottles, kegs or pints at the taproom — their business is in peril. In some cases this spring, brewers had to dump perfectly good beer down the drain because there was no way to sell it.

 

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Local brewery’s newest COVID themed ale

 

WARWICK, R.I. (WLNE) – Here we go again!  Proclamation Ale Company in Warwick is selling another COVID themed beer.  Introducing ‘Knock It Off: The Sequel’.

 

The brewery’s Facebook page says that this is sadly coming out at exactly the perfect time, as Rhode Island’s coronavirus case numbers surge.

 

The beer is a 9.5% abv Triple IPA which Proclamation hopes “will put people in just enough of a stupor that they will stay at home and nap instead of going out!”

 

They describe it as having aromas of bold tropical fruit and candied orange and mouthwatering notes of stonefruit, mango, citrus, and soft tropical fruit.

 

KNOCK-IT-OFF-SEQUEL.jpg

 

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Bell’s is back in Virginia! It’s a Christmas Miracle!

 

Nearly two years after stopping sales in Virginia due to a dispute with their distributor, Bell’s Brewery beers are back on Virginia’s shelves after a resolution was reached.   I have a case of Two-Hearted Ale I’ve been happily sipping in celebration.

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3 hours ago, Dan T. said:

Just received from a good friend in California and just in time for Super bowl weekend... four bottles of

 

russian-river-pliny-the-elder-ii.jpg?w=6

 

 

 

Love me some Pliny.  We can usually find it on tap around town here if you know the bars/burger joints to go to.  I have still as of yet never got my hands on the annual Pliny the Younger release, but it will happen one day.   Pliny was THE standard by all of which others were judged against for a long time.

 

I had a 4-pack of Pale from the Crypt delivered from Liquid Gravity brewing along with a 4pack of their sour Guava Punch.  

 

I live close to Track 7 and picked up their 9th anniversary beer and the piledriver IPA for the big game tomorrow.

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World's 'oldest brewery' uncovered at ancient Egyptian city of Abydos

 

Archaeologists have discovered what could be the oldest-known brewery at one of Egypt's most prominent historic sites.

 

Eight huge units - each about 20m by 2.5m - were found in Abydos, an ancient burial ground in the desert.

 

Each unit included two rows of around 40 pots, used to heat the mix of grains and water to make the beer, said Egypt's ministry of tourism and antiquities.

 

skynews-egypt-beer-brewery_5271837.jpg?b

 

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City of Las Vegas will offer incentives to attract businesses to ‘Brewery Row’

 

The City of Las Vegas sees an opportunity to get in on the craft beer movement and it plans to do it by giving an incentive package to new businesses willing to open in area designated by the city as Las Vegas Brewery Row.

 

According to a city news release, the incentive bill was introduced at the city council meeting Wednesday and will be voted on later. The proposed package would offer authorization on a temporary basis of the waiver of the liquor license origination charge for qualifying businesses that establish on Brewery Row.

 

“This new opportunity will be the key to continuing the momentum many pioneer brewers started. I am confident these incentives will attract many who are interested in pursuing their life’s passion and dream,” said Councilwoman Olivia Diaz. 

 

Brewery Row would be in an area downtown where a cluster of craft brewers have already been working.

 

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Guinness Brewery teams with Black Marylanders to create specialty beers that fund social justice efforts

 

Courtney Holden wanted to create a beer that would be undeniably intertwined with Black culture.

 

That meant “See Us,” a brown ale infused with the flavors of sweet potato, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and a whisper of vanilla.

 

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“It actually does taste like a sweet potato pie,” said the queer Black beer enthusiast. “It tastes like the hug from a aunt you haven’t seen in a long time.”

 

This year, Black Marylanders are teaming with Guinness Open Gate Brewery to launch a series of limited-edition beers as part of the Allyship Through Collaboration Series.

 

These beers, which are steeped in flavors often associated with Black culture, are the latest in a series of initiatives that the Halethorpe brewery has launched as part of Guinness Gives Back Baltimore Community Fund, a million-dollar commitment to support three areas in the Baltimore region’s Black community: economic justice, community empowerment and equal representation. All proceeds from these specialty beers will benefit the Jobs Opportunities Task Force, a Baltimore-based nonprofit that works to eliminate educational and employment barriers for low-wage workers.

 

So far, each of the beers in the series — 100 cases plus drafts available at the brewery — have sold out soon after their debut. The company will donate $200,000 of the money raised to the jobs nonprofit.

 

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Cracking open the mystery of how many bubbles are in a glass of beer

 

After pouring beer into a glass, streams of little bubbles appear and start to rise, forming a foamy head. As the bubbles burst, the released carbon dioxide gas imparts the beverage’s desirable tang. But just how many bubbles are in that drink? By examining various factors, researchers reporting in ACS Omega estimate between 200,000 and nearly 2 million of these tiny spheres can form in a gently poured lager.

 

Worldwide, beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages. Lightly flavored lagers, which are especially well-liked, are produced through a cool fermentation process, converting the sugars in malted grains to alcohol and carbon dioxide. During commercial packaging, more carbonation can be added to get a desired level of fizziness. That’s why bottles and cans of beer hiss when opened and release micrometer-wide bubbles when poured into a mug. These bubbles are important sensory elements of beer tasting, similar to sparkling wines, because they transport flavor and scent compounds. The carbonation also can tickle the drinker’s nose. Gérard Liger-Belair had previously determined that about 1 million bubbles form in a flute of champagne, but scientists don’t know the number created and released by beer before it’s flat. So, Liger-Belair and Clara Cilindre wanted to find out.

 

The researchers first measured the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in a commercial lager just after pouring it into a tilted glass, such as a server would do to reduce its surface foam. Next, using this value and a standard tasting temperature of 42 F, they calculated that dissolved gas would spontaneously aggregate to form streams of bubbles wherever crevices and cavities in the glass were more than 1.4 µm-wide. Then, high-speed photographs showed that the bubbles grew in volume as they floated to the surface, capturing and transporting additional dissolved gas to the air above the drink. As the remaining gas concentration decreased, the bubbling would eventually cease. The researchers estimated there could be between 200,000 and 2 million bubbles released before a half-pint of lager would go flat. Surprisingly, defects in a glass will influence beer and champagne differently, with more bubbles forming in beer compared with champagne when larger imperfections are present, the researchers say.

 

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