Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

CNN: So what if Obama were a Muslim or an Arab?


Heisenberg

Recommended Posts

Commentary: So what if Obama were a Muslim or an Arab?

Story Highlights

Campbell Brown says McCain right to set the record straight about Obama

We've all been too quick to accept that calling someone Muslim is a slur, she says

Brown asks why being an Arab-American should be a disqualifier for higher office

We need to distinguish between radical Muslims and the rest, she says

By Campbell Brown

CNN

Editor's note: Campbell Brown anchors CNN's "Campbell Brown: Election Center" at 8 p.m. ET Mondays through Fridays. She delivered this commentary during the "Cutting through the Bull" segment of Monday night's broadcast.

NEW YORK (CNN) -- You may find it hard to believe that this remains an issue in this campaign, but it does.

The candidates, both candidates, are still getting questions about Barack Obama's ethnicity and religion. If you are even semi-informed, then by now you already know that of course, Barack Obama is an American.

Of course, Barack Obama is a Christian. Yet just a few days ago, there was a woman at a rally for John McCain incorrectly calling Obama an Arab:

Woman at rally: I don't trust Obama. I have read about him and he's an Arab.

Sen. John McCain:No ma'am, no ma'am. He's a decent family man, citizen that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues. That's what this campaign is all about. He's not, thank you.

Now, I commend Sen. McCain for correcting that woman, for setting the record straight. But I do have one question -- so what if he was?

So what if Obama was Arab or Muslim? So what if John McCain was Arab or Muslim? Would it matter?

When did that become a disqualifier for higher office in our country? When did Arab and Muslim become dirty words? The equivalent of dishonorable or radical?

Whenever this gets raised, the implication is that there is something wrong with being an Arab-American or a Muslim. And the media is complicit here, too. video.gifWatch Campbell's commentary »

We've all been too quick to accept the idea that calling someone Muslim is a slur.

I feel like I am stating the obvious here, but apparently it needs to be said: There is a difference between radical Muslims who support jihad against America and Muslims who want to practice their religion freely and have normal lives like anyone else. iReport.com: iReporter pleads with voters to 'stop the racism'

There are more than 1.2 million Arab-Americans and about 7 million Muslim-Americans, former Cabinet secretaries, members of Congress, successful business people, normal average Americans from all walks of life.

These are the people being maligned here, and we can only imagine how this conversation plays in the Muslim world. We can't tolerate this ignorance -- not in the media, not on the campaign trail.

Of course, he's not an Arab. Of course, he's not a Muslim. But honestly, it shouldn't matter.The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the writer.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/13/campbell.brown.obama/index.html

Won't be a popular view here . . . but one I happen to agree with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Commentary: So what if Obama were a Muslim or an Arab?

Story Highlights

Campbell Brown says McCain right to set the record straight about Obama

We've all been too quick to accept that calling someone Muslim is a slur, she says

Brown asks why being an Arab-American should be a disqualifier for higher office

We need to distinguish between radical Muslims and the rest, she says

By Campbell Brown

CNN

Editor's note: Campbell Brown anchors CNN's "Campbell Brown: Election Center" at 8 p.m. ET Mondays through Fridays. She delivered this commentary during the "Cutting through the Bull" segment of Monday night's broadcast.

NEW YORK (CNN) -- You may find it hard to believe that this remains an issue in this campaign, but it does.

The candidates, both candidates, are still getting questions about Barack Obama's ethnicity and religion. If you are even semi-informed, then by now you already know that of course, Barack Obama is an American.

Of course, Barack Obama is a Christian. Yet just a few days ago, there was a woman at a rally for John McCain incorrectly calling Obama an Arab:

Woman at rally: I don't trust Obama. I have read about him and he's an Arab.

Sen. John McCain:No ma'am, no ma'am. He's a decent family man, citizen that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues. That's what this campaign is all about. He's not, thank you.

Now, I commend Sen. McCain for correcting that woman, for setting the record straight. But I do have one question -- so what if he was?

So what if Obama was Arab or Muslim? So what if John McCain was Arab or Muslim? Would it matter?

When did that become a disqualifier for higher office in our country? When did Arab and Muslim become dirty words? The equivalent of dishonorable or radical?

Whenever this gets raised, the implication is that there is something wrong with being an Arab-American or a Muslim. And the media is complicit here, too. video.gifWatch Campbell's commentary »

We've all been too quick to accept the idea that calling someone Muslim is a slur.

I feel like I am stating the obvious here, but apparently it needs to be said: There is a difference between radical Muslims who support jihad against America and Muslims who want to practice their religion freely and have normal lives like anyone else. iReport.com: iReporter pleads with voters to 'stop the racism'

There are more than 1.2 million Arab-Americans and about 7 million Muslim-Americans, former Cabinet secretaries, members of Congress, successful business people, normal average Americans from all walks of life.

These are the people being maligned here, and we can only imagine how this conversation plays in the Muslim world. We can't tolerate this ignorance -- not in the media, not on the campaign trail.

Of course, he's not an Arab. Of course, he's not a Muslim. But honestly, it shouldn't matter.The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the writer.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/13/campbell.brown.obama/index.html

Won't be a popular view here . . . but one I happen to agree with.

Shouldn't matter but it would matter. Just shows how shallow we are as American's and haven't made much progress from the days of segregation and racism. Its sad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only reason it would be an issue for me now, if Obama came out and said he was a Muslim, would be that he would've lied about something as fundamental as his faith. Essentially any trustworthiness he could've had would be gone at that point.

On their surface, for me anyway, being "Arab" or "Muslim" certainly isn't a disqualifier. My best friend in high school was a first-generation American whose parents were from Iran. They were -- and are -- just as much Americans as I am.

My church in Cumberland is part of an "interfaith-consortium." It's basically a loose connection of churches, synagogues, and mosques, that strive for understanding and acceptance through socialization, sharing of faith, and community outreach. I wish we could see more of that sort of thing on a global scale. As long as we're hiding our heads in the sand, or simply cursing the "other guy," this kind of stigma will continue.

One of the things I'm most thankful for was the pastor who taught my confirmation class. Before we had our confirmation, he brought in representatives of virtually every Christian faith, as well as Muslims, Jews and Hindus, to explain the basic tennants of their faith. It really opened my eyes, and provided me an opportunity to make a more informed decision.

I'm not a tree-hugging, bleeding-heart by any stretch. But it's incumbent upon the majority -- in this case Christians -- to reach out and put an end to the "stigma" that's associated with Islam in this country. Sure, there are some horrible people out their who claim to be Muslim. (Just like there are horrible people out there who purport to be Christians.) But the overwhelming majority of Muslims are good, decent, upstanding people. And isn't that what we want in a president?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only reason it would be an issue for me now, if Obama came out and said he was a Muslim, would be that he would've lied about something as fundamental as his faith. Essentially any trustworthiness he could've had would be gone at that point.

On their surface, for me anyway, being "Arab" or "Muslim" certainly isn't a disqualifier. My best friend in high school was a first-generation American whose parents were from Iran. They were -- and are -- just as much Americans as I am.

My church in Cumberland is part of an "interfaith-consortium." It's basically a loose connection of churches, synagogues, and mosques, that strive for understanding and acceptance through socialization, sharing of faith, and community outreach. I wish we could see more of that sort of thing on a global scale. As long as we're hiding our heads in the sand, or simply curing the "other guy," this kind of stigma will continue.

One of the things I'm most thankful for was the pastor who taught my confirmation class. Before we had our confirmation, he brought in representatives of virtually every Christian faith, as well as Muslims, Jews and Hindus, to explain the basic tennants of their faith. It really opened my eyes, and provided me an opportunity to make a more informed decision.

I'm not a tree-hugging, bleeding-heart by any stretch. But it's incumbent upon the majority -- in this case Christians -- to reach out and put an end to the "stigma" that's associated with Islam in this country. Sure, there are some horrible people out their who claim to be Muslim. (Just like there are horrible people out there who purport to be Christians.) But the overwhelming majority of Muslims are good, decent, upstanding people. And isn't that what we want in a president?

Great post H_H. :applause::applause::applause:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great post H_H. :applause::applause::applause:

Great topic, and one that we haven't addressed properly during this whole election mess. :cheers:

And Ish, I know it's of little solace, but I'm sorry that your beliefs could in any way be considered a "smear" by anyone. I can't imagine how that must feel. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why would this not be a popular view here? I bet 90% of the board agrees with that article.

Maybe, but eventually there will be a vocal few who I'm willing to bet are very vocal in their disagreement.

Although one of them hasn't been around in a pretty long while it seems. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only reason it would be an issue for me now, if Obama came out and said he was a Muslim, would be that he would've lied about something as fundamental as his faith. Essentially any trustworthiness he could've had would be gone at that point.

On their surface, for me anyway, being "Arab" or "Muslim" certainly isn't a disqualifier. My best friend in high school was a first-generation American whose parents were from Iran. They were -- and are -- just as much Americans as I am.

My church in Cumberland is part of an "interfaith-consortium." It's basically a loose connection of churches, synagogues, and mosques, that strive for understanding and acceptance through socialization, sharing of faith, and community outreach. I wish we could see more of that sort of thing on a global scale. As long as we're hiding our heads in the sand, or simply cursing the "other guy," this kind of stigma will continue.

One of the things I'm most thankful for was the pastor who taught my confirmation class. Before we had our confirmation, he brought in representatives of virtually every Christian faith, as well as Muslims, Jews and Hindus, to explain the basic tennants of their faith. It really opened my eyes, and provided me an opportunity to make a more informed decision.

I'm not a tree-hugging, bleeding-heart by any stretch. But it's incumbent upon the majority -- in this case Christians -- to reach out and put an end to the "stigma" that's associated with Islam in this country. Sure, there are some horrible people out their who claim to be Muslim. (Just like there are horrible people out there who purport to be Christians.) But the overwhelming majority of Muslims are good, decent, upstanding people. And isn't that what we want in a president?

Nice post. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you're missing the point H_H. If Obama was Muslim and lied about it, then yes, he'd be a liar. But the point is, people arent "accusing" Obama of being a liar, they're "accusing" him of being Muslim. The (racist) assumption is that being Muslim is a bad thing.

Obama says he represents change and a new type of politician. Unfortunately, every chance he gets to actually change something (such as the accepted undertone of racism towards Arabs/Muslims), he weasles out.

In the end, we Americans are just as racist as ever, only we've found a new target -- Muslims. What a shame. Its unbecoming of the leader of the free world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well it wasn't about this particular article and I obviously didn't get a chance to see the original thread.

My apologies.

Not saying you shouldn't ask the question. It's just that if you're interested there was a LONG discussion about this a few months back. Unfortunately the search feature here stinks and I can't dig it up for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the Muslim faith is there any rule of law besides the Koran? If the answer is yes then I don't see how a Muslim could hold any position in American government and not be in direct conflict with their religious beliefs.

I want to go on record and say I have no issue with the President being of any descent including Arab.

And please let's not confuse Muslim with Arab. One is a religion and one is a race.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My biggest critic of him, as you all have seen

He has done a very good job of keeping being called a "Muslim" a "smear"

"The Muslim smear"

He has denied it, as if there is something wrong with it

Obama reaction to this has been indeed gutless, but please spare me SHF. Last time I checked, it is your party that suffers from a deep case of Islamophobia. Visited free-republic or red-state recently? Did you read Michelle Malkin's defense of Japanese internment, the point of the book was to make the case for Arab detainment. The national review last time I checked is home to people like Mark Steyn. Your own party leaders routinely spew anti-Arab talking points.

Your inability to see what is right in front you is profoundly disappointing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obama reaction to this has been indeed gutless, but please spare me SHF. Last time I checked, it is your party that suffers from a deep case of Islamophobia. Visited free-republic or red-state recently? Did you read Michelle Malkin's defense of Japanese internment, the point of the book was to make the case for Arab detainment. The national review last time I checked is home to people like Mark Steyn. Your own party leaders routinely spew anti-Arab talking points.

Your inability to see what is right in front you is profoundly disappointing.

Your inability to stop following me on this issue is profoundly disappointing.

What I say on ES isn't the only type of talk or action that I engage in, in real life or on the internet

So we'll just leave it at that

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your inability to stop following me on this issue is profoundly disappointing.

What I say on ES isn't the only type of talk or action that I engage in, in real life or on the internet

So we'll just leave it at that

I am sorry if partisanship pisses me off. In fact very early in the campaign season, Obama and his supporters used his middle name as a positive talking point ( people don't remember this). It wasn't until it was used as a weapon against him ( by self proclaimed conservatives and republicans) where Obama had to repeatedly point out that he is not a muslim.

EDIT: By the way, you must be pretty sensitive to this situation ( very understandable I might add, ), because this is only the 2nd time I have addressed this with you ( after all I was gone for 6 months during most of the primary season). I guess this is a conversation you have with many people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obama says he represents change and a new type of politician. Unfortunately, every chance he gets to actually change something (such as the accepted undertone of racism towards Arabs/Muslims), he weasles out.

I agree that Obama has pretty much allowed it to stand that being called a muslim is tantamount to a slander, but give Barack credit at least for his handling of the Reverend Wright issue which could have really blown up and turn the primaries into a white/black thing.

After that thing blew up, Obama didn't ignore it he went out and gave perhaps the finest speech on race in America that I've heard in my adult lifetime. He did not "weasel" out of that one at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...