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The Spurrier Chronicles


Om

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"But the real tragedy is that 15 hadn't been colored yet." – SS, on an Auburn dorm fire that destroyed 20 books<br /><br />*<br /> <br />Last night I just happened upon Lindy's Sports Annual on the Spurrier years at Florida. Let me put it this way ... you can only read so much at a sitting. <br /><br />After the first 5 pages, you're hyperventilating. <br /><br />After the first 10, your wife catches the look in your eye and either 1) jumps your bones, 2) suspects you're reading porn again and stalks off in disgust, or 3) if you're a lucky sort, she thinks you're reading porn again AND jumps your bones. <br /><br />After the first 15 pages (and catching your breath because, of course, you ARE in fact a lucky sort) ... you have her go make you a sandwich while you go to your computer to tell your buds on ExtremeSkins all about it. The magazine, not the luck.<br /><br />At any rate, I'm gonna post some of the more salient and/or entertaining things. Not all at once, though, mind you ... I like it to last. <img border="0" title="" alt="[smile]" src="smile.gif" /> <br /><br />We'll start with some raw numbers:<br /><br />* Florida's overall record in 83 seasons of playing football before SS was 452-322-39, for a winning percentage of .579. With SS, the Gators were 122-27-1 ... that's .817.<br /><br />* In SEC history from 1933 to ‘89, the Gators' record was 148-166-15, for a winning percentage of .473. With SS, the Gators went 87-14 in SEC games (.861).<br /><br />* From the outset of the AP poll in 1936 through 1989, the Gators were ranked in the top five for a total of 12 weeks and were No. 1 for just one week. With SS, they were ranked in the top five for 117 weeks and were No. 1 for 29 weeks.<br /><br />* Florida never won an official SEC championship before SS and never won more than nine games in any season. The Gators won six conference title under him and won at least 10 games nine times. (Can't you just hear Mr. Rooney? "Niiine times")<br /><br />* Before the SS era, the Gators never scored 350 points in a season. With the Fun "N Gun, UF scored more than 350 points in 11 of his 12 seasons and broke the 500-point barrier every year from 1993 to ‘96.<br /><br />* Gator QB's had never thrown for 25 TD's in one season before 1990. SS's QB's did it every year, including over 40 in 2001 and each season from 1993-96.<br /><br />* Against arch-rival Georgia, the Gators were 22-43-2 before SS arrived, a winning percentage of .343. With SS, the Gators went 11-1 (.917).<br /><br />* From 1933-89, Florida had a losing record in the all-time standking agsints seven of the current member of the SEC. Under SS, the Gators have a winning record against every conference foe.<br /><br />Now, for those with half-empty glasses on your desk, and who can't resist responding with "yeah, but this is the NFL," I have this to say: <br /><br />Ppppffffffft. My glass is half full. <br /><br />More later ...<br /> <br /> <small>[ March 26, 2002, 01:03 PM: Message edited by: Om ]</small>

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</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Against arch-rival Georgia, the Gators were 22-43-2 before SS arrived, a winning percentage of .343. With SS, the Gators went 11-1 (.917). </font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Bulldog fans around the world rejoiced at the news that Spurrier was moving on. This was a HUGE game to Bulldog fans, but for the last decade, it was an automatic W for gator fans. Now, maybe, the worlds biggest coctail party will become a bit more interesting.

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I've done some reading on S.S. myself Om, though without as much....luck.. as you sir. Hmmmm. Pick up line or singles in the new millenium? "HI. Want to come to my place and watch me read?"...nah. Anyway. I like the numbers myself. <br /><br />I also have read a couple of offensive coaching books that have S.S. contributions in them. One line that caught my eye was that he treated every down as if it was 3rd and 8. Read aggressive. My particular glass is half full as well. If it gets a little lower, I just read and <img border="0" alt="[pint]" title="" src="graemlins/pint.gif" /> .<br /><br />I have a funny feeling tha S.S. may just be smart enough to figure out the differences between the NFL and college all on his own thankyou very much. That is, if one chooses to asume he didn't know already. Yea right.

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Refreshing OM - let's hope he can duplicate at least 70 percent of what he did then. <img border="0" alt="[cool]" title="" src="graemlins/cool.gif" /> <img border="0" alt="[pint]" title="" src="graemlins/pint.gif" /> <br /><br />ND that would be the frosting on the brewskie!

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I honestly thought that Marty Schottenheimer was (and is) a pretty good coach. He wins with defense and special teams play and doesn't seem to take a lot of crud. <br /><br /> But I was ready to drop him almost at once for Spurrier. <br /><br /> I see a lot of SEC ball down here. Georgia isn't the only state rejoicing at his passing from the college ranks. <br /><br /> I've got to admit I'm a bit fearful of some of the 'names' we're bringing in, but I'm willing to wait and see. I found the '01 Redskins to be almost completely uninspiring. I want a team and coach that frightens the opponent. <br /><br /> He'll have to prove himself on the field, but if he can do half of what he did in college, we're gonna be mighty smug this year.

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TC, you might appreciate: <br /><br />After if became clear that he should pursue other careers, Al Gore applied for the job as Head Ball Coach at U Ga, citing, I suppose, his ability to inspire groups of followers. <br /><br />They turned him down, though, because if you can't win in Florida and Tennessee. . .

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"We didn't win ‘em all, but we were up there fighting for it. It didn't work out all the time, but we came close." – SS, at his resignation press conference.<br /><br />*<br /><br />Lindy's Sports Annual: "12 Years of Dominance"<br />By Gene Frenette<br /><br />One of Steve Spurrier's first acts when he took ever as football coach at Florida in 1990 was to have the artificial playing surface torn up and replaced with natural grass. For the next 12 season, the man proceeded to tear up opponents just a effectively, with his Fun "N Gun passing attack and his glib tongue.<br /><br />As a coach, the Gators' Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback redefined how football was played in the Southeastern Conference.<br /><br />And when Spurrier unexpectedly bid farewell on Jan. 4, 2002, the pursue his longtime dream of coaching in the NFL, he left behind a legacy that can perhaps only be matched by Alabama's legendary Paul "Bear" Bryant in terms of lasting impact on the modern era of college football.<br /><br />While Bryant put in far more time of the sideline – 38 seasons at four different schools, including a quarter-century with the Crimson Tide, – what Spurrier did at Florida with his penchant for aggressive, air-it-out football was exactly what Bryant had long feared would happen at Florida if the Gators ever got the right coach: tap the school's unlimited potential in a state loaded with high school talent.<br /><br />Spurrier was already a folk hero at his alma mater when he arrived from Duke, because he had bought Florida a large partt of the national football acclaims the school had received by that point, the the Gators' only Heisman recipient. <br /><br />He had added to his stature in ‘89 by leading Duke to the ACC championship, its first and only league crown since 1962.<br /><br />In no time at all – starting with a four-play scoring drive on UF's opening possession of a 50-7 win over Oklahoma State in his first game – Spurrier's accomplishments as a coach would come to dwarf his impressive resume as a college quarterback. <br /><br />What did he change about Gator football? Only everything.<br /><br />Not only did UF see virtually every significant school record fall under his leadership, but more important, so did all those long held perceptions about Florida being an underachiever.<br /><br />"When he came to Florida and the SEC, it was play defense and run the football," said Gators' linebacker/special teams coach Jim Collins, the only assistant coach who was on Spurrier's staff for all of his 15 season as a college head coach, including three years at Duke. "Now it's completely changed. You've go to be able to throw the ball and score points. There's no doubt in my mind about the impact he had on this league and college football in general. Coach Spurrier is an icon."<br /><br />The picture of UF football before and after Spurrier is so stunningly dramatic, you have to digest the number a while to appreciate this 180-degree turnaround.<br /><br />[this is where all the "raw numbers" stuff above comes in ...]<br /><br />One of the more compelling descriptions of Spurrier's reign at Florida came from the ball coach himself at his farewell news conference. He talked about how he was watching a replay of the 1968 British Open when Jack Nicklaus lost to Gary Player by two strokes, using the story of Nicklaus' career to illustrate what te took the greatest pride in about his 12-year run at Florida.<br /><br />"The program went on to say that Nicklaus finished runner-up in the British Open six times," said Spurrier. "You don't always win, but you hang around near the top like our guys have. People always ask what are you most proudest of here and I would say hanging out near the top. <br /><br />"Those championships are nice, but in years where they don't happen, our guys were hanging near the top fighting it out for the SEC Championship."<br /><br />Indeed, the Gators finished either first of second in the SEC of the SEC Eastern Division every year under Spurrier. In addition to those six conference titles, the Gators also had the best league record in Spurrier's first season, but went unrecognized as SEC champions because the NCAA had put UF on probation in 1990 for a violation committed four year earlier.<br /><br />He has repeatedly defended that team's right to be called champions, criticizing his own school in his farewell address for not recognizing the ‘90 squad with its other SEC title teams on the south end zone wall at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium.<br /><br />He was vintage Spurrier right to the end. Whether it was the unexpected announcement that he was leaving for th NFL or his play-calling or just giving his opinion, one thing the ball coach has never been is predictable.<br /><br />*<br /><br />More to come ...

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