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ESPN.com: Art Monk: In the words of ...


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Wide Receiver Art Monk: In the words of ...(Link)

Here is the link to a similar article on Green (Link)

Teammate Darrell Green

Green, Monk's friend and fellow Hall of Famer, on battling Art in practice and, why despite a long wait, he is deserving of the Hall of Fame:

"I knew him from television, watching him when I was in college and seeing the Redskins winning big in 1982. So I had seen him by way of television, and when I got a chance to play against him I was obviously in awe. A big receiver like that, that run fast like that, and catch the ball like he caught it, was pretty neat. I think that the competition with him is what helped me become what I am.

"I think that I would just say that with the guys that are in the hall of fame, and I played against a lot of them, he is every bit as good as they are. His speed, his hands, his route-running, his competitiveness, …I mean goodness, he had the record for catches at one point, and he had the record for most catches in a single season. So you know, what do you want?"

Opponent Eric Allen

Allen, who played corner for the division rival Philadelphia Eagles and drew a match up with Monk numerous times over his career, on matching up with the quiet Art Monk:

"He was what I call a chain mover. He was the guy that was always going to keep the team on the football team. Every time we played the Redskins, you knew he was going to be a pivotal part of the game.

"Only two guys I can remember that were quiet like that on the field, and would never give me the time of day. Because I would try and have a conversation when I was playing. I would talk to the guy and find out where he was at mentally … but Art Monk and Jerry Rice never ever bothered. They were always professionals, always worried about the game, and didn't even give me the time of day."

Art Monk

Monk, on growing up in New York, and the lesson he learned from his time playing youth football:

"I did play Pop Warner football. I played for one year. I was 11 years old. I was convinced to go out with my friends. It was the worst experience I ever had in my life, but in a good way. As much as I loved the game and wanted to play it, because we always played it in the streets, now I was playing organized football.

"It wasn't as easy as I thought it would be. I mean, it was a lot of hard work, you know, practice, other guys that were just more talented than you. It just kind of woke me up and said, hey, wow, if I'm really going to have to play this game, I'm going to have to change my thinking about it.

"It was a bad experience, but it was the greatest experience I ever could have had. It kind of changed my whole paradigm and thinking about what I needed to do to be successful at it."

A Story

Eric Allen's story about trying to prepare for the unique, trail blazing, route-running skills of Monk:

"He had a certain way of running routes later in his career. He would basically option off of where the defender was. And it was just such a difficult task. And one offseason, I got all his film -- and he doesn't know this -- and I'd go over his routes, and try and run his routes myself so I would kind of understand what he was doing. I almost broke my ankle a couple times.

"He would run and he would jump up and as soon as he would land, he would just take off opposite of where you were. As he was doing this, no one else in the league was really doing that, everybody else was running normal routes. But about three or four years later, guess who started to do that -- Cris Carter."

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"Only two guys I can remember that were quiet like that on the field, and would never give me the time of day. Because I would try and have a conversation when I was playing. I would talk to the guy and find out where he was at mentally … but Art Monk and Jerry Rice never ever bothered. They were always professionals, always worried about the game, and didn't even give me the time of day."

Art Monk - Jerry Rice had to look up to somebody.

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"He would run and he would jump up and as soon as he would land, he would just take off opposite of where you were. As he was doing this, no one else in the league was really doing that, everybody else was running normal routes. But about three or four years later, guess who started to do that -- Cris Carter."

Guess who ****ed about not making the hall after Art was inducted :rolleyes:

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"He would run and he would jump up and as soon as he would land, he would just take off opposite of where you were. As he was doing this, no one else in the league was really doing that, everybody else was running normal routes. But about three or four years later, guess who started to do that -- Cris Carter."

I like this quote :laugh:

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"He had a certain way of running routes later in his career. He would basically option off of where the defender was. And it was just such a difficult task. And one offseason, I got all his film -- and he doesn't know this -- and I'd go over his routes, and try and run his routes myself so I would kind of understand what he was doing. I almost broke my ankle a couple times.

Now that's a cool little story. :)

"He would run and he would jump up and as soon as he would land, he would just take off opposite of where you were. As he was doing this, no one else in the league was really doing that, everybody else was running normal routes. But about three or four years later, guess who started to do that -- Cris Carter."

Uh huh. This is why it's always cool to hear/read things from the guys who were there.

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This praise for Monk is long overdue. Clearly his peers always thought he was HOF material . . . why it took so long for the voters is something we'll never know.

One reason is probably because they were never one of his peers.

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I like this quote :laugh:

It's exactly the reason why I can't fathom people not wanting Art in, but thinking that loudmouth Carter was so much more deserving. Makes no sense. Art Monk literally created the type of WR and moves that Carter was and used and did so in a "crossover" era where passing still wasn't as widely loved as the era from which Carter benefited.

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Kelly should read this.

If we could get a Monk like production from a WR we'll win multiple SBs again. Tough act to follow but Jerry Rice showed not impossible.... I'm not comparing just holding up examples :D

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Yeah I liked this article. Always nice to hear the competition give some reverance for your favorite players. There's nothing not to like about Monk. Dude was just a total professional and never let his status go to his head. That's a REAL hall of fame player to me.

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