Springfield

The "Ask a Mechanic" Thread

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On 1/21/2019 at 5:08 PM, Malapropismic Depository said:

@twa @Springfield

My Engine Light diagnostics revealed the following diagnostic code, on a 2002 Saturn SL2

 

P0706 Transmission Range Sensor A.

 

I was told that this issue could also be the cause for "false readings" of 2  more error codes, on the Coolant Thermostat, and the Camshaft Position Sensor A.

Is that true ?

 

Also told that replacing the Transmission Range Sensor should only cost a few hundred. Is that also accurate ?

 

 

On 1/22/2019 at 4:08 PM, Springfield said:

So it looks like, by and large, the transmission switch is the most likely cause.  I don’t think those are very hard to replace.

 

EDIT:  If you have multiple trouble codes for multiple different systems, clear them all.  Drive the vehicle and see which code returns first, fix that and then proceed.

 

Generally speaking a “coolant thermostat” code always means that the thermostat is sticking open and needs replacement.

 

I need to revisit this scenario, due to a confusing outcome.

I brought it to a Transmission Specialist, who has a high reputation in town, to investigate the above code, P0706 Transmission Range Sensor A,

 on the 2002 Saturn SL2.

They actually said that there is nothing wrong with the Transmission or related parts.

They said what I needed is an Ignition Module. They recommended another shop who did that work, and sent me home.

So, the dash lights reset, and cleared, after their diagnostics, and the light has not gone back on.

However, I continue to have symptoms that seem transmission-related.

Often, when I hit the gas, the RPM's go way up, but there is little or no acceleration.

And at high speeds, the RPM's seem to run unusually high, as if it's not going into overdrive, which I thought was an automatic response in this car.

I don't know much about this Ignition Module that the Transmission Mechanic said I need, but from the sounds of the word "Ignition", it does not

sound related to these issues I'm having. These seem to be transmission-related, while the mechanic said the transmission is fine.

Would you guys be able to clarify for me ?

TIY.

 

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Well, ignition modules basically fire the spark plugs and sometimes include the coil packs on those cars.  I’d probably start there if a reputable technician has suggested it.  There are a lot of times where ignition failures can be confused for transmission failures.

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Posted (edited)

@Springfield but anyone else is free to respond of course... directing at him because he owns/runs a private garage

 

For my 2014 Sienna, according to the Sienna message board posters, the transmission fluid is sealed. Also, they say that toyota requires proprietary ("WS(?) fluid in their transmission. Also, that the fluid change needs to happen at a specific temperature. All this sounds very complex—will a private garage or a non-toyota dealership be able to perform this service? 

 

I have no interest in DIY for changing the transmission fluid. The dealership wants ~$300 for the service, which seems steep. I took it in at 36K miles and the toyota website says the trans interval is at 60K miles—but they said the fluid was dirty. 

Edited by Elessar78

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300 is reasonable, the fluid is rather pricey and it is a PITA

 

you might ask for a discount since it shouldn't be dirty at 36K, but the age factors as well as mileage.

 

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2 minutes ago, twa said:

300 is reasonable, the fluid is rather pricey and it is a PITA

 

you might ask for a discount since it shouldn't be dirty at 36K, but the age factors as well as mileage.

 

Thanks for the response. I called the toyota dealer back because I have an airbag recall anyway. I asked about the price of a trans fluid change and now they quoted me $205. Shady stuff. 

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Posted (edited)
45 minutes ago, Elessar78 said:

@Springfield but anyone else is free to respond of course... directing at him because he owns/runs a private garage

 

For my 2014 Sienna, according to the Sienna message board posters, the transmission fluid is sealed. Also, they say that toyota requires proprietary ("WS(?) fluid in their transmission. Also, that the fluid change needs to happen at a specific temperature. All this sounds very complex—will a private garage or a non-toyota dealership be able to perform this service? 

 

I have no interest in DIY for changing the transmission fluid. The dealership wants ~$300 for the service, which seems steep. I took it in at 36K miles and the toyota website says the trans interval is at 60K miles—but they said the fluid was dirty. 

 

 

MOST shops are capable of doing transmission fluid flushes, but a lot of them elect to send customers to the dealer due to the 'fragile' nature of the transmission.  

 

WS fluid is a very common trans fluid in the asian world.  its used in MULTIPLE applications.   Toyota can sell you the fluid, as well as a brand called Aisin.  Part number ATF0WS

 

As far as the specific temperature, the transmission needs to be at optimum idle / running temperature so that the fluid LEVEL is measured when the fluid is at the 'thinnest' viscosity.  Oil's (much like the grease in a pan) are thinner at high temperature, and thicker at lower.  This way the transmission fluid level is measured at what level it will be while the vehicle is running / driving. 

 

 

It's not difficult to check the clarity of your fluid as long as the transmission has a dipstick.  

29 minutes ago, twa said:

300 is reasonable, the fluid is rather pricey and it is a PITA

 

you might ask for a discount since it shouldn't be dirty at 36K, but the age factors as well as mileage.

 

 

 

I was thinking the same thing.  

 

36k in 5 years is actually very low regarding AVG per year, so i dont see why it would be at a level of dirty that would be recommended to service.  

 

Edited by OVCChairman

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So I called back to schedule it and a different person said it would be $320 after taxes because it's the sealed/no dipstick type of transmission. The $205 was for the other type. 

 

I do feel the transmission rev high at times before shifting into the next/correct gear—is this a sign that the dealership was being truthful?

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2 minutes ago, Elessar78 said:

So I called back to schedule it and a different person said it would be $320 after taxes because it's the sealed/no dipstick type of transmission. The $205 was for the other type. 

 

I do feel the transmission rev high at times before shifting into the next/correct gear—is this a sign that the dealership was being truthful?

 

 

Not from what i've encountered.  Dirty fluid (at your mileage interval) SHOULD not effect the performance directly.  The dirty fluid COULD be a symptom, not a cause.  Generally the performance of the transmission based on fluid breakdown, is not noticeable until well after the fluid change interval. 

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, Springfield said:

My work here is done.  :)

 

 

😎

 

You know our industry... the work is never done.... 

Edited by OVCChairman

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I've had this problem happen with multiple cars.

The buttons stick, on the steering wheel. Namely the cruise control.

Somehow, the same button gets stuck in each car.

Is this an easy fix ? Can I lube it without damaging other sensitive parts around it ?

Do I need to remove part of the steering wheel ?

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52 minutes ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

I've had this problem happen with multiple cars.

The buttons stick, on the steering wheel. Namely the cruise control.

Somehow, the same button gets stuck in each car.

Is this an easy fix ? Can I lube it without damaging other sensitive parts around it ?

Do I need to remove part of the steering wheel ?

 

usually wd 40 and a toothbrush work

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On 4/22/2019 at 6:55 PM, twa said:

 

usually wd 40 and a toothbrush work

 

@twa I got a similar thing goin on with my ignition.

Frequently the key won't turn at all. Just stuck in one position, and won't turn any direction clockwise or counter.

Tried turning the steering wheel while doing it, as some suggested, and tried flipping the key the other way, but

most of the time, I can literally spend minutes fiddling with it, until it randomly decides to turn.

 

So I was wondering if I could try a similar solution as the "stuck buttons" above.

If I spray WD40 directly into the key-hole of the ignition, will it (a) possibly work, and of course (b) not damage any sensitive internal ignition parts ?

Thanks !

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

@twa I got a similar thing goin on with my ignition.

Frequently the key won't turn at all. Just stuck in one position, and won't turn any direction clockwise or counter.

Tried turning the steering wheel while doing it, as some suggested, and tried flipping the key the other way, but

most of the time, I can literally spend minutes fiddling with it, until it randomly decides to turn.

 

So I was wondering if I could try a similar solution as the "stuck buttons" above.

If I spray WD40 directly into the key-hole of the ignition, will it (a) possibly work, and of course (b) not damage any sensitive internal ignition parts ?

Thanks !

 

Yes you can flush with wd, though it is best to put some graphite in afterwards if it frees up.(dry lube) 

you can just rub the key with pencil lead if ya poorboy it.

 

having another key cut can help(or try a spare key that is less used), but if the cylinder itself is going bad it will need replaced

 

add

you can also try inserting the key and giving it a sharp tap with a hammer(driving straight into cylinder) as a last resort.

Edited by twa
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10 minutes ago, twa said:

 

Yes you can flush with wd, though it is best to put some graphite in afterwards if it frees up.(dry lube) 

you can just rub the key with pencil lead if ya poorboy it.

 

having another key cut can help(or try a spare key that is less used), but if the cylinder itself is going bad it will need replaced

 

add

you can also try inserting the key and giving it a sharp tap with a hammer(driving straight into cylinder) as a last resort.

 

Thanks for the multiple options.

I should have saved time and asked you this before. But I recently took the car to a shop due to an engine light going on.

They said it's because I need a new Ignition Control Module. They didn't fix it because they're a transmission shop, so they

don't do that kind of work. So I let it linger, since I didn't see any major symptoms.

But now I wonder, and I ask, could this "Ignition Control Module" he's talking about have anything to do with me having a hard time

turning the ignition key ? I wasn't sure, since the ICM sounds like a part that would be far or separate from the key ignition, but I could be wrong.

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Ignition control module is different than the lock and tumbler or the ignition switch.  Ignition control module is under the hood and controls the spark ignition.

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On 5/23/2019 at 4:27 PM, Springfield said:

Ignition control module is different than the lock and tumbler or the ignition switch.  Ignition control module is under the hood and controls the spark ignition.

 

Just now saw this. Thanks and good to see you back, Springfield.

I got a little worried, when a while back, you posted "my work here is done".

I wasn't sure if you meant on a particular issue, or you were permanently done watching this thread. Although I can understand, if you needed a break. I appreciate everything you, twa, and everyone else does here.

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10 minutes ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

Just now saw this. Thanks and good to see you back, Springfield.

I got a little worried, when a while back, you posted "my work here is done".

I wasn't sure if you meant on a particular issue, or you were permanently done watching this thread. Although I can understand, if you needed a break. I appreciate everything you, twa, and everyone else does here.

 

Nah it was mainly because twa answers the questions quicker than I can and he’s generally correct.

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Hope it's not a bother to ask something else, whenever it's convenient for you all.

 

Whenever I go on a long drive, usually longer than 2 hours, my engine light goes on, and diagnosis says that the thermostat is stuck open.

Asked around, and what I'm hearing is that it's much better to be stuck open, than stuck shut.

And that the worst that can happen when stuck open, is it takes a long for the heater to heat up. But obviously that's not a concern, this time of year.

 

My question is, if it's susceptible to being stuck open on long drives, does that necessarily means there's about an equal chance it could

get stuck shut on a long drive, as well, since that would be much worse ?

Also, is it a sign that the thermostat is about to die soon anyway, and I'm better off just replacing it soon ?

Would like to know, because I'm supposed to go on another very long drive soon.

 

Thanks !

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It could just be the temp sensor or bad connection in wiring instead

 

Can't say w/o testing, odds are it will not stick shut if it hasn't yet

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On 6/1/2019 at 6:08 PM, twa said:

It could just be the temp sensor or bad connection in wiring instead

Speaking of temp sensors... I can't find the "Ambient Temperature Sensor" location in my 2015 Chrysler 200. I didn't even care until I found out that's why my AC isn't working.

 

Could someone help me? I've been looking since January. I have the piece. 

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8 minutes ago, CrypticVillain said:

Speaking of temp sensors... I can't find the "Ambient Temperature Sensor" location in my 2015 Chrysler 200. I didn't even care until I found out that's why my AC isn't working.

 

Could someone help me? I've been looking since January. I have the piece. 

 

the one for outside temp is behind the grille/frt bumper cover, there is a interior one in the overhead console

 

On the 2.4l and 3.6L the AAT removal instructions: 

  1. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative cable.
  2. Raise and support the vehicle.
  3. Remove the front fascia lower close out panel from the vehicle.
  4. Reach up between the lower edge of the front fascia and the front of the a/c condenser near the right end of the lower air intake opening to access the ambient temperature sensor (3) just below the front bumper (1).
  5. Disengage the Connector Position Assurance (CPA) lock of the wire harness connector (2) for the sensor and depress the connector latch tab.
  6. Pull the sensor straight out of the connector.
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