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2007 NFL Defenses - Yards/Game versus Sacks/Int/FF


Shilsu

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defense.jpg

Notes:

Pressures versus sacks. My belief is that there is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks. If my logic is faulty, feel free to prove me wrong and do this board a great service.

Forced fumbles are for defense AND offense. However, I think it's safe to say that more forced fumbles happen on defense than on offense.

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While the difference overall looks like it is less for worse defense, but it hardly looks like concrete evidence. It seems very up and down.

To me it just shows how many different types of defensive minds are in the NFL. Each team seems to have very different systems, causing for this chart to look up and down.

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While the difference overall looks like it is less for worse defense, but it hardly looks like concrete evidence. It seems very up and down.

To me it just shows how many different types of defensive minds are in the NFL. Each team seems to have very different systems, causing for this chart to look up and down.

I agree with the OP's basic premise of there being a direct correlation between pressure and sacks. However, I think there are just too many independent variables involved to qualify the correlation thusly. Like was said above too many things would have to be accounted for: defensive scheme/philosophy, small sample size (such as Winston Justice being directly responsible for 6 Giants sacks) and others. I like this kind of analysis but I'm always unsure how significant it is given the small sample size of 16 games.

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For people who need a starting point...

To me, there is a trend that the more sacks you have, the less yards you are giving up per game. The biggest outliers are Carolina, Chicago, and Detroit. Carolina ranked second to last in sacks, but their defense is ranked middle of the pack. Chicago and Detroit both had a lot more sacks than their fellow bottom dwellers, yet both still have lowly defenses.

There is also a trend with forced fumbles and interceptions, but much less pronounced.

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defense.jpg

Notes:

Pressures versus sacks. My belief is that there is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks. If my logic is faulty, feel free to prove me wrong and do this board a great service.

Forced fumbles are for defense AND offense. However, I think it's safe to say that more forced fumbles happen on defense than on offense.

Are pressures actually shown anywhere on that chart? Or is that an aside that's not shown or mentioned anywhere else in your post? Cuz I'm not exactly sure why you brought the topic up in your "notes".

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Are pressures actually shown anywhere on that chart? Or is that an aside that's not shown or mentioned anywhere else in your post? Cuz I'm not exactly sure why you brought the topic up in your "notes".

I just mentioned it, because there's always someone who says, "What about pressures".

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To me the most important stat is yards given up/play.

The top 9 defenses in y/p made the playoffs last year.

The worst playoff defense by that metric was Jacksonville, 17th overall. So all 12 playoff teams finished in the top 17.

Compare that with yards/play offenses where only 5 of the top 10 offenses made the playoffs, and the Redskins made the playoffs with the 20th rated offense.

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Califan007, you're right. There is no pressure statistics on that chart.

Shilsu, if you're going to there is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks it may be a good idea to run a regression with statistical software. By doing so, you can set pressures, or sacks, as the independent variable and see to what degree, and statistical significance, different variables affect it. Then, you can get a correlation coefficient and see if what you say is correct.

However, there may be different missing variables that you are forgeting they may not be able to be measure, like defensive line speed, quality of defensive line, schedule rank, etc. These variables may sway the findings one way or another.

But before you run this regression, think about what you are saying. There is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks. It seems the more times a defense pressures a quarterback, the more times they will tackle him. That's like saying, the more you go to the mall, the more you will buy, or any other analogy one can think of along the same lines. Seemingly, it seems like it is correct.

As a side note, once I finish undergrad, I plan on going to grad school for statistics.

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To me the most important stat is yards given up/play.

The top 9 defenses in y/p made the playoffs last year.

The worst playoff defense by that metric was Jacksonville, 17th overall. So all 12 playoff teams finished in the top 17.

Compare that with yards/play offenses where only 5 of the top 10 offenses made the playoffs, and the Redskins made the playoffs with the 20th rated offense.

You gotta do the yards-per-pay differential between offense and defense if you REALLY want to be thorough lol :thumbsup:...

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Califan007, you're right. There is no pressure statistics on that chart.

Shilsu, if you're going to there is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks it may be a good idea to run a regression with statistical software. By doing so, you can set pressures, or sacks, as the independent variable and see to what degree, and statistical significance, different variables affect it. Then, you can get a correlation coefficient and see if what you say is correct.

However, there may be different missing variables that you are forgeting they may not be able to be measure, like defensive line speed, quality of defensive line, schedule rank, etc. These variables may sway the findings one way or another.

But before you run this regression, think about what you are saying. There is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks. It seems the more times a defense pressures a quarterback, the more times they will tackle him. That's like saying, the more you go to the mall, the more you will buy, or any other analogy one can think of along the same lines. Seemingly, it seems like it is correct.

As a side note, once I finish undergrad, I plan on going to grad school for statistics.

This has NOTHING whatsoever to do with the topic or even with football, but I would think the more you go to the mall, the LESS you would buy. Because if you don't go to the mall often, it would seem to mean that you only go there when you ARE going to buy something. But if you go to the mall a lot, then it means you go there for other reasons than to shop.

As a side note, I tend to enjoy being the contrarian lol... :cool:

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Its easy to see the best teams have the most sacks. Sacks are huge. I wish we would blitz more since our front 4 does not generate pressure consistently, nor do we even stunt our guys. We contain. ZZZ.

That's what jumped out at me as well. Get to the QB and your team has a chance to be pretty good. You have a chance to change the game with one play, or at least get the ball back for the offense and a rest for the Defense.

During the Patriots debacle I was begging for a blitz, just hit Brady somehow and get him frustrated. Instead GW had them play back and Brady had a field day. The Giants did it right, I really hope Chris Wilson is ready to make an impact. Carter should continue to be a beast.

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Oh Califon, what you do not understand. What I said was an analogy, and I knew it had nothing to do with football. And also what you said is based solely on opinion, which by use of data analysis one can find you probably are not correct. Since a mall contains normal, non-durable goods moreso than luxury goods, one goes to the mall because they always want to purchase things on multiple occasions. A car dealership would be a poor example since cars are durable goods, which you do not buy many of in a short amount of time.

What you have to learn before you question is to have facts to back up your answer. I guess all you Californians are the same...

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Notes:

Pressures versus sacks. My belief is that there is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks. If my logic is faulty, feel free to prove me wrong and do this board a great service.

Forced fumbles are for defense AND offense. However, I think it's safe to say that more forced fumbles happen on defense than on offense.

Hey bro, by pressures i figure you mean QB pressures? If there is a correlation between pressures and sacks, your chart doesn't do anything to confirm or deny this assertion.

Unfortuneatley it will probably be fairly difficult to get the stats on qb pressures. I know some teams record stats like pressures, hurries, tackles for loss, and qb knock downs. But, i don't think the NFL records these stats.

It does seem logical that a team high in pressures would be high in sacks.

If pressures were a recorded stat i think they would be more important then sacks.

:cheers:

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defense.jpg

Notes:

Pressures versus sacks. My belief is that there is a direct correlation between pressures and sacks. If my logic is faulty, feel free to prove me wrong and do this board a great service.

Huh?

Okay. So what does the bar graph have to do with that assertion?

And of course sacks are a function of pressure. That's like saying receptions are a function of passes :doh:

And finally, what are you hoping to prove by creating that graph? Or is it just FYI?

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interesting. look at teams like minnesota and chicago--statistically they had stout defenses last year in just about every area, but their poor rankings in yards per game is probably correlated with the inability of their offenses to manufacture drives consistently. your defense is only as good as the offense at its worst...

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