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Into the Wild


Tarhog

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Anyone here read Jon Krakauer's book? I spent some time in distant airports last week, and was actually reading over a guy's shoulder. A page and 1/2 in, I was hooked. Kid from Annandale, graduate of Emory University, hits the road to try and unload a lot of family baggage he's been carrying around and basically to 'find himself'. Decides to head into the Alaskan wilderness with little more than the clothes on his back, ultimately costing him his life.

Very interesting read. Apparently, in 2007 Sean Penn made a movie of it that was nominated for some Oscars, but I somehow missed it. Anyone else read the book or catch the movie?

Pretty sad and powerful story.

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Something about this makes me laugh :laugh:

Maybe cuz the guy was probably about to say, "Get your own damn book !"

I didn't finish the sentence :)

After reading a paragraph or two, I got hooked and picked up a copy in the airport bookstore....

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I got the book for Christmas and read it - pretty good. I just have a hard time feeling sympathy for people like that because he basically asked for it. I mean, its one thing to want to go into the Alaskan wilderness, but its another thing altogether to go into the wilderness completely unprepared...just plain stupid. I feel sorry for his family, but he gets no sympathy from me. Especially since he wasn't that remote, and if he'd had a simple map, he'd have seen there was a crossing a few miles down the river (where he hadn't explored).

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I read the book a few years ago and I thought it was great. I'd been reluctant to pick it up... because as much as I liked Into Thin Air and Under The Banner of Heaven, a story about a guy who gets lost in the woods just sounded boring.

JRock, I don't think the book was about sympathy. It was more about what would possess someone to undertake something like that. Although I still think that you can't help but feel sorry for someone like that... not because he wasn't prepared, but because he felt like he had so much to prove.

I thought the part that Krakauer spent talking about his own father and the traits he inherited to be the most memorable part of the book. And probably one of the most memorable things I've read.

.....

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I got the book for Christmas and read it - pretty good. I just have a hard time feeling sympathy for people like that because he basically asked for it. I mean, its one thing to want to go into the Alaskan wilderness, but its another thing altogether to go into the wilderness completely unprepared...just plain stupid. I feel sorry for his family, but he gets no sympathy from me. Especially since he wasn't that remote, and if he'd had a simple map, he'd have seen there was a crossing a few miles down the river (where he hadn't explored).

I hear ya. Ordinarily, I'd have the save view. Something interesting about him though. I was kind of lost at that age, so I guess the whole thing resonates with me a little bit. He may not have been deep in the Amazon, but to wander around for a year with little to no means of support, no friends (other than the ones he made), and take your chances (he rode a kayak to Mexico on his own before he headed North), it takes personal courage. I kind of respect that he marched to his own drummer.

Just a really bizarre story. And that he basically had the same upbringing I did struck a chord with me.

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I actually decided to read the book after seeing this trailer for the movie:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=2mSniFAXeKo

I loved the book - finished it in a week or so.

The movie did not disappoint either (as I think most movies do when I've read the book first). Hal Holbrook (who is nominated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor) was AMAZING, as were the rest of the characters McCandless meets on his journey.

So basically I'd recommend the movie AND the book. Both were wonderful :)

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Great points zoon....and for those of us who've had a semi-****ed up relationship with our Dads (I'm suspecting thats lots of us), who know that theres love there but also a strange kind of tension and lack of acceptance, again, struck a chord with me.

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Great points zoon....and for those of us who've had a semi-****ed up relationship with our Dads (I'm suspecting thats lots of us), who know that theres love there but also a strange kind of tension and lack of acceptance, again, struck a chord with me.

Absolutely. And it is definite food for thought for us as fathers, too.

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JRock, I don't think the book was about sympathy. It was more about what would possess someone to undertake something like that. Although I still think that you can't help but feel sorry for someone like that... not because he wasn't prepared, but because he felt like he had so much to prove.

Yeah, the author was trying to get a feel for the why, and not necessarily evoke any feelings of sympathy for the kid, but I felt he tried to paint him in too positive a light. At least that was the impression I got. It was a good read, for sure.

I didn't have a rosy relationship with my father either (I suspect Tarhog is right - there are probably very few of us who did) and I've done some things I'm not proud of in "retaliation" as well, so that part did strike a chord. However I didn't go into the Alaskan friggin wilderness with a 10 lb bag of rice and old, worn-out sneakers on either. :laugh:

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