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After Guantanamo, 'Reintegration' for Saudis


Mad Mike

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/09/AR2007120901411.html?nav=rss_nation

For five years, Jumah al-Dossari sat in a tiny cell at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, watched day and night by military captors who considered him one of the most dangerous terrorist suspects on the planet.

In July, he was suddenly released to his native Saudi Arabia, which held a very different view. Dossari was immediately reunited with his family and treated like a VIP. He was given a monthly stipend and a job, housed and fed, even promised help in finding a wife. Today, he is a free man living on the Persian Gulf coast.

Critics are concerned that the arrangement will simply return some extremists to the streets. Defense officials say about 30 of the nearly 480 detainees released from Guantanamo have again taken up terrorist activities.

Click on the link for the full story.

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Bonus link.

Names of the Detained in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/guantanamo/

The Pentagon List

On May 15, 2006, the Pentagon released to the Associated Press the first comprehensive list of everyone who has been held at Guantanamo Bay, more than four years after it opened the detention center. Two-hundred and one of the names had not been disclosed by the Defense Department before. That more complete register follows below. Post researchers will continue to monitor the names on this new list to verify the information previously reported and will provide updates as they are available.

See Also

Detainees by Age

Detainees Charged by Military Commissions

Detainees Classifed as "No Longer Enemy Combatants" (NLECs)

Guantanamo Bay Timeline

Some interesting info and stories in this link. Such as...

Ismail, Mohammed

According to the Pentagon, "Ismail was released from GTMO in 2004. During a press interview after his release, he described the Americans saying, 'they gave me a good time in Cuba. They were very nice to me, giving me English lessons.' He concluded his interview saying he would have to find work once he finished visiting all his relatives. He was recaptured four months later in May 2004, participating in an attack on US forces near Kandahar. At the time of his recapture, Ismail carried a letter confirming his status as a Taliban member in good standing."

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I'm just always infinitely surprised that we ever release anyone from Gitmo, considering how sinister we evidently are. Seems like those warm bodies should be used to satiate our guards' lust for torture, practice new techniques and such... /sarcasm

OR maybe we are the good guys after all?

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1) Kudos to the military for actually publishing the information. A little information (assuming it's accurate) will go a long way to clearing a lot of smoke and mirrors out of the discussion.

2) As to numbers released, I haven't done a count (wish they'd published that list as a spreadsheet), but a quick attempt at counting the names on that list makes me think that the "480 released" the OP refers to is the number of Saudis released.

Edit: Decided to actually read the OP (I'd got side tracked by the pentagon list), and it seems to have different numbers from what I saw. I'm trying to figure out what I'm mis-reading.

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