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DIY Home Improvement Thread..


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That was it for the night. We now have a kitchen sink with three holes, a rusty pool that needs to be cleaned along the back, and a new faucet waiting to be installed. I need to go back to the store for a replacement cold water hose and the corresponding nuts to hopefully avoid leaks, but otherwise, I think this might turn out alright. Hopefully, there will be positive updates tonight/tomorrow.

I consider myself fairly handy, but I have NEVER had a plumbing project (no matter the size) go according to plan. There's a reason those guys charge $60+ per hour!

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Okay. Rescued the lawn,(though a lot of it is going bye bye down the road. Xeriscaping),next up is the building of storage space in the garage,then the eave venting thing. Oh joy. ;)

The four foot by five foot racks that hang from the ceiling are great, Kobalt brand at Lowe's for about 139. They hold 500lbs. Put them in for a customer I did kitchen work for, I will put in two of these in my garage in the future.

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I like those,but I'm going to go ahead and build them myself for the most part,(though I may look in to those for above the garage door). Cheaper and I customize.

Tools are ready for the new home,(few small additions to make,but overall ready to go). Even have this half of the garage for building too,(carpenter's man cave. :D ).

Edited by Park City Skins
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Oooooooo, somebody got him a shiny new DWS780. How do you like the light? Much nicer than a laser IMO

You also bought the correct stand. I have the Delta version that stand is a copy of, it's probably 7 years old now. Best stand ever.

Look for a rolling change on compressors to all go back over to Emglo branded (will still be the same thing)

You have great taste PCS :D

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I figured you just might notice the telltale yellow of those guys. ;) I like the light and the stand is superb. Especially in this particular environment. I've used a lot of tools in my day,including versions of both of those guys in the picture. If I have to frame a house and such,I'll take those two. Exterior and big finish work as well. Unlike a few other things I've used from Dewalt,(though that was several years ago),those are durable as hell,(work very well in the very cold weather I might add). I'd take them along with their impact driver,(every man must own one by the way). I've set windows to huge pine corners with oly logs with that little beast. If I'm doing fine finish work,I like the Hitachi compound saws. Oh and thanks for the heads up on the compressors.

Edited by Park City Skins
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I consider myself fairly handy, but I have NEVER had a plumbing project (no matter the size) go according to plan. There's a reason those guys charge $60+ per hour!

I actually think plumbing is one of the easiest things for me when remodeling. I have replaced all my old plumbing in the house to CPVC, changed toilets, drains etc...as long as you take your time its not bad. Also if you ever have a burst pipe the easiest thing to do is grab a shark bite fitting and fix it that way. Very quick fix and it will last as long as glued or solder pipe. I have now done all new plumbing, flooring, tore down my kitchen and rebuilt it new drywall and electrical. This is an awesome thread btw OP.

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I like those,but I'm going to go ahead and build them myself for the most part,(though I may look in to those for above the garage door). Cheaper and I customize.

Tools are ready for the new home,(few small additions to make,but overall ready to go). Even have this half of the garage for building too,(carpenter's man cave. :D ).

Not sure if you're responding to the site I posted, but if you got a rig like that then you're probably capable of doing it on your own. My carpentry skills are just a little north of "girl scout".

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Not sure if you're responding to the site I posted, but if you got a rig like that then you're probably capable of doing it on your own. My carpentry skills are just a little north of "girl scout".

Nope. I bookmarked that site you put up and it looks to be a good companion to others and the books I have here. :)

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Nice. For the first time in my life I can actually set up a shop and have enough room to make things happen without affecting other parts of my life. Probably a benefit of homeownership that I never thought about. What I like about that site is that you can modify the designs since they've broken it down. Maybe one day I'll quit my day job and build furniture.

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It takes a special personality type to be a good woodworker. I'm not talking about construction, I'm talking about guys who make jewelry boxes and cabinets and furniture and crafts and such. You must have the patience of Jesus and the anal retentiveness of someone who was potty trained by nuns.

If you're wondering if you are that personality type, there is a simple test you can take to find out. Here it is:

Are you able to relate in any way to the outside world?

(a) No

(B) Yes

If you answered A to the above, you might have the right stuff. Buy a sander. But not just any sander. You'll need to buy the $600 Fess Tool RO sander because that's how you roll. It comes in a custom case after all that fits neatly on your cabinet shelf that is labeled "RO sanders"

Edited by zoony
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Careful now. One day you're fixing a table or dresser,the next,you open and close the tool department at the lumber store and you don't even work there. :silly:

Assume I have nothing decent other than a really basic tools like a drill, screw driver, hammer, etc.

What is the starter set of tools you'd get to get a woodworking shop up and running?

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Assume I have nothing decent other than a really basic tools like a drill, screw driver, hammer, etc.

What is the starter set of tools you'd get to get a woodworking shop up and running?

If it were me, I wouldn't buy starter tools. I would save my money and buy one piece at a time, something of good quality. That way you're not turning them back in a few years or trying to sell a POS that nobody wants because you want to upgrade. Power Tools are very much 'get what you pay for', with a few exceptions (some of the German tools are embarassingly expensive, and quite simply a rip-off)

I would check craigs list and ebay for used equipment. Many professional shops are getting rid of their old table saws to install SawStop technology to satisfy insurance needs. You could probably get a helluva nice UniSaw or something similar for not a lot of money right now. If they're taken care of they last forever. Good quality tools will perform better, be safer, last forever, and provide actual enjoyment. You won't be out there cussing your powertools.

For a basic shop (as far as power tools go), I would recommend:

-Table saw

-Joiner

-Router with router table (some table saws work as a router table)

-RO Sander

-Finishing sander/detail

-Dust collection system, even if it's homemade. Seems like that would be a luxury but after 1/2 a day in your shop you'll realize its a necessity.

you can add other tools like scroll saws, planers, drill press, dovetail jigs, etc. when you get up and going and figure out what exactly you want to do. In the meantime stick with hand-held jig saws, drills, etc. to save money.

Do you have a Woodcraft retail store near you? They are incredibly helpful.

Edited by zoony
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Success! New faucet and hoses installed!

Congrats ... the one thing I've learned in my DIY short lifespan is that the right tool makes difficult jobs easy. The wrong tools means busted hands, a poor job, and hating the process.

In the future for under the sink or tight needs this tool is one of your friends:

[ATTACH]47227[/ATTACH]

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Assume I have nothing decent other than a really basic tools like a drill, screw driver, hammer, etc.

What is the starter set of tools you'd get to get a woodworking shop up and running?

Zoony nailed it,(pun kind of intendend),with his answer. Later on,depending on the type of wood working you'll be doing,you may need some fine hand tools,(block planers,chisels,those kind of things).

Alrighty then. Attic inspection done. Good news is,despite no eave vents,there doesn't seem to be any signs of condensation therefore mold. On the bad side,they covered the 2x6 blocking with insulation,(though that appears to be at more than the depth needed). It is of course,nasty up there and I have some work to do. :paranoid:

atticsmll.jpg

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One of the circles of hell is working in an attic, I'm convinced. I rented a blower and added insulation this winter. One of the best things I've done, but boy did that job suck.

PCS looks like you dodged a bullet with mold. No vents? Yikes. They make those styrofoam inserts that allow you to fill up insulation while your soffit can still vent your attic. I'm sure you know about them but on the off chance you didn't thought i would post it

Edited by zoony
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One of the circles of hell is working in an attic, I'm convinced. I rented a blower and added insulation this winter. One of the best things I've done, but boy did that job suck.

PCS looks like you dodged a bullet with mold. No vents? Yikes. They make those styrofoam inserts that allow you to fill up insulation while your soffit can still vent your attic. I'm sure you know about them but on the off chance you didn't thought i would post it

You got that right. The issues here are several though. When a previous owner painted and textured the ceilings,they covered any possible access to the attic,(that or it was never there. I'll be fixing that). So I have to enter through the wall up top in the garage via a poorly made door. Needless to say,that's an opening for gasses and such from the garage. Probably can't tell from the pic,but they also laddered 1/2 inch by 6 inch pieces of fir over the rafters when they rebuilt the roof several years ago. All kinds of gaps up top that also let in gasses from the garage,(which doesn't have a roof vent either). Now on the plus side,the attic over the house has 3-4 roof vents so there is a noticeable difference between the temp up in the roof area of the garage and the main attic space. Still have to go up there and get the insulation,(such as it is),out of the way of the eaves so I can vent them. I have heard of those Z,but only once and had forgotten them. Glad you brought them up so I can look in to them. Thanks for that.

Looks like the perfect hiding place for one of those giant spiders that he likes to post. Be careful, man. Wouldn't want to unexpectedly lose a hand in there. :silly:

I was keeping my eye out for Shelob to come out from somewhere to be sure. ;)

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One of the circles of hell is working in an attic, I'm convinced. I rented a blower and added insulation this winter. One of the best things I've done, but boy did it suck.

i re-insulated my crawl several years ago, that sucked. Did some hvac for a couple summers, 140 degree attics are no joke!

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