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FrFan

Escalating misbehavior of some NFL players, what do you think ?

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Being from Cincinnati, I could shed some light on it. IMO, alot of players probably get away with stuff because of the police looking the other way. I could see this in New York with someone like Jeter, although Jeter isnt like this.

In my experience, Cincinnati police are basically tough on anyone, possibly letting Pete Rose get by. Im sure they tried to calm Huggins down when he got his DUI, but ended up arresting him and it eventually led to him leaving UC.

But, the Bengals players are idiots. Everyday in the Newspaper you read how Chris Henry is arrested for the 4th time. The Bengals are not the pride of the town, so the police probably dont feel so bad arresting them. Just me ranting.

But for the Bengals, Mike Brown definately doesnt give a rats ass about the character of his players and it shows.

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"AMPA, Fla. (AP) - Jacksonville Jaguars receiver Charles Sharon was charged with stealing a handgun that police said was found under the seat of the player's sport utility vehicle during a drug-related search."

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I'm not sure if its on the rise, or if there is just more media now with the internet thus more exposure and opportunities for these things to come to light. I think a few years ago alot of this would have been brushed under the rug

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I really hope the start some kind of league penalty, like missing games, not just fines, because when you have that much money it doesn't really matter, but when you start hurting your team because you can't play then your teamates get mad at you. Something has to be done, this is ridiculous, esp when they are let off for everything they do. These people are supposed to be our heroes not the dregs of our society.

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It's extraordinarily disappointing. My dad raised me using people such as Art Monk and Darrell Green as examples of what it meant to be a person.

Now I think of who we have, and who I'll raise my kids on, and I don't know if I'd ever use any of them as role models.

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Agreed, i think they should go to jail like any other person. kick them out of the NFL too.

Then ST would be in prison. He plead nolo contendre, which is him pleading guilty without assuming guilt. Want him kicked out, too?

People make mistakes, and these are generally still young guys who become instant millionaries and don't have any training to handle the fame or fortune. Let's make sure that we note the differences between basic minor offenses which people are being arrested for, and some of the major things that they are getting locked up for.

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These athletes are products of our society. In a hip-hop culture that does nothing but glorify illegal drugs and violence, objectifies women, vilifies law enforcement, and tells people that making money is the only purpose of life, it cannot be surprising that these athletes emulate what they've grown up seeing and listening to in movies, tv, and music. I know Russel S. would just say it's a case of art reflecting life, and that is true, in the ghetto...but rather than telling the stories of what life is like on the streets and how to rise above it, the culture glorifies it and perpetuates it until it spreads to other portions of society.
:doh:

Not all athletes come from the ghetto.

Not all athletes listen to Hip Hop.

Not all athletes buy into that culture.

You're mentality is a product of society if you ask me.

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Then ST would be in prison. He plead nolo contendre, which is him pleading guilty without assuming guilt. Want him kicked out, too?

That's not really true. It literally means "I do not wish to contend" the charge. It's usually the plea in cases where there is enough evidence and witness testimony to convict the defendant, when a plea bargain is being offered.

In connection with the plea, he was fined almost $72,000 by the NFL, but since there was no conviction, he was not suspended.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/07/AR2006080701017.html

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Then ST would be in prison. He plead nolo contendre, which is him pleading guilty without assuming guilt. Want him kicked out, too?

People make mistakes, and these are generally still young guys who become instant millionaries and don't have any training to handle the fame or fortune. Let's make sure that we note the differences between basic minor offenses which people are being arrested for, and some of the major things that they are getting locked up for.

I agree that we need to remember that these guys are only 22 (Okoye will only be 19!) when they suddenly become richer than we can even imagine. A lot comes with that.

After mulling over this thread, I'm sure that the same things would've been said 20 years ago. Riggins was a "drunk", LT was using, Manley was using, etc. Things are publicized a lot more than they were back then, and the NFL is infinitely more glamorized now that it's making billions and billions a year than it was back in "the day." People made mistakes back then, too, but you just didn't hear about them. As a social work student, I'd say that things are definitely worse now, but they weren't A+ back then, either.

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I agree that we need to remember that these guys are only 22 (Okoye will only be 19!) when they suddenly become richer than we can even imagine. A lot comes with that.

Point of information: Okoye will actually be twenty before the season begins. His birthday is in June.

But anyway, I do think that we should hold these players responsible for their actions. I think it's reasonable to assume that they know the difference between right and wrong by their early twenties, and also have the werewithal to deduce the probable illegality of their actions. The problem lies with their unwillingness to do right for the sake of right. I guarantee that for every player who gets caught breaking the law, there are at least two more who get away with it. They know that they can afford the best attorneys in the country, so they'll face little or no penalty from the legal system. The only way to deter them is to hit them in the wallet, which is what the league tries to do. If that doesn't stop them, I don't know what else will.

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I think I was right when I said 35 arrests in a year was way off.

Do arrests like this one count:

"Unrestricted free agent tight end Jerramy Stevens, the former first-round draft choice whose five-year tenure with the Seattle Seahawks was marked by bad hands and poor off-field decisions, was arrested early Tuesday morning in Scottsdale, Ariz., and charged with driving under the influence and possession of marijuana. "

Or the one I posted earlier? Thats 2 in the past day.

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35/1696 = 2.06% of the players in the NFL that got in trouble. Look around at your job, is that even a reflection upon society? I'm sure more than 2% of the people at your job have been/are currently/will be in some kind of legal trouble.

There's far more media coverage now to keep tabs on athletes. Without the internet, before sportscenter, other than the radio & newspaper, how were you going to hear about the things that an athlete does in his private time?

oh please. that' a bit slippery don't you think? 2.06% of the people I work with are not snorting cocaine, speeding in ferraris over 100 mph on city streets, involved in night club shootings...or spitting in people's fcaes for that matter....not to mention irrelevant.

break the law...pay the price. end of story.

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Point of information: Okoye will actually be twenty before the season begins. His birthday is in June.

But anyway, I do think that we should hold these players responsible for their actions. I think it's reasonable to assume that they know the difference between right and wrong by their early twenties, and also have the werewithal to deduce the probable illegality of their actions. The problem lies with their unwillingness to do right for the sake of right. I guarantee that for every player who gets caught breaking the law, there are at least two more who get away with it. They know that they can afford the best attorneys in the country, so they'll face little or no penalty from the legal system. The only way to deter them is to hit them in the wallet, which is what the league tries to do. If that doesn't stop them, I don't know what else will.

And if he signs his contract before June, then my statement was still right. ;) Gotta love semantics.

As for the hits in the wallet, who cares? What's 10K for a night of fun when you're making four million that year?

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A lot of good thigs being said which I agree with but I think its more complex than just young men who become instant milionaires and don't know how to handle it or the influence of being raised in a poor background and/or surrounded by negative messages from rap/heavy metal/hip hop music or whatever etc. Though all these things do have an effect I'm sure.

I think you also need to consider a system where these players have been singled out since High School as 'stars'. They get adulation, corners cut on tests and even maybe the odd brush with the law gets swept under the table - nothing major maybe but its let go.

Then they recruited like heck by major Colleges - flown in on private planes, shown around town and a good time, get a free education, great accomodation, national TV exposure, more adulation, maybe even who knows a bit of 'expenses' get paid for them or their families (see Bush Reggie) they get to cut classes and still make their grades and maybe graduate (did you know Dexter Manley left University UNIVERSITY unable to read?).

Then comes the draft the NFL and the money which just adds yet more complexity and many more ways to get into trouble now they can afford to pay for all kinds of interesting things;)

Bottom line should we be surprised that kids who have been told they are special and gifted and treated with kid gloves since they were about 12 end up acting like the spoiled kids many of them still are and thinking they are above the law and untouchable?

They need to be handled better by their High Schools, Colleges and The NFL and the teams - taught how fortunate they are to have the gifts they do, made aware early of the pitfalls and the responsibilities that they have to themselves and their schools/league/team and helped to manage their cash and given lifetsyle counselling and assistance. If they then still screw up - and being people some will - they need to be held accountable for their actions at every stage of the process - not just when somebody gets hurt or a major felony is committed.

Rant over ......

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parents, its usually the parents. or these guys, just get all of this money. and they just think they are invincible. and can do whatever they want, cause they think that money is gonna buy them out of everything. its a shame when these people make these ignorant actions, cause there are some of us who would play this game, blue collar wise. Wouldnt want the big pay check and just play for the love of the game.

See : Darrell Green

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:doh:

Not all athletes come from the ghetto.

Not all athletes listen to Hip Hop.

Not all athletes buy into that culture.

You're mentality is a product of society if you ask me.

I'm going to give you the opportunity to rethink what you wrote here. At no point did I say that all athletes come from the ghetto, or listen to hip hop, or buy into that culture. However, the VAST, VAST majority of those in legal problems do. If anyone wants to disagree with me on that, then you are proving your ignorance on the subject. My mentality is common sense.

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oh please. that' a bit slippery don't you think? 2.06% of the people I work with are not snorting cocaine, speeding in ferraris over 100 mph on city streets, involved in night club shootings...or spitting in people's fcaes for that matter....not to mention irrelevant.

break the law...pay the price. end of story.

Out of 1696 people ya'll are stuck on the 2%...that isn't a reflection of even a large portion of the NFL. You could say unequivocally that noone at your job has ever broken the law? Never has sniffed cocaine? Never sped on the highway? Never been in a bad situation at a nightclub? Never been in a physical altercation? Why are athletes held to a higher standard than the rest of society? All they do is play a sport.

Big bank account doesn't = class, doesn't give you maturity or wisdom. These are all things people gain throughout their lifetime....

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Out of 1696 people ya'll are stuck on the 2%...that isn't a reflection of even a large portion of the NFL. You could say unequivocally that noone at your job has ever broken the law? Never has sniffed cocaine? Never sped on the highway? Never been in a bad situation at a nightclub? Never been in a physical altercation? Why are athletes held to a higher standard than the rest of society? All they do is play a sport.

Big bank account doesn't = class, doesn't give you maturity or wisdom. These are all things people gain throughout their lifetime....

agree with the last para.

"never" is an absolute that no one can prove. on average, based on anecdotal evidence, I would say that folks in the company I work for (which happens to have a more aged population) do not do the sorts of things NFL thugs have done. many have security clearances they would immediately lose for these kinds of activities - in short...their livelihoods. Do I have data? No. Do I know anecdotally after many years the people I work with and what is happening behind the scenes? Yes. I can say this just as comfortably as I can assert that Joe Gibbs doesn't do any of these things.

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agree with the last para.

"never" is an absolute that no one can prove. on average, based on anecdotal evidence, I would say that folks in the company I work for (which happens to have a more aged population) do not do the sorts of things NFL thugs have done. many have security clearances they would immediately lose for these kinds of activities - in short...their livelihoods. Do I have data? No. Do I know anecdotally after many years the people I work with and what is happening behind the scenes? Yes. I can say this just as comfortably as I can assert that Joe Gibbs doesn't do any of these things.

You're talking about being caught doing it. Just because they've never been caught or charged doesn't mean that they haven't ever done it. Especially (in your case) if they're older and were working before a rise in the regularity of preemployment drug screens...and before the time it became easy to run a comprehensive background check. I've worked extensively with clearances as well, and anecdotally alot of the people I knew (not most or all, but more than the outsider would think) have been in shady situations as well.

These are guys in their early twenties that went from not even being able to accept gifts to waking up with millions in their bank account. They should definitely be given some leeway, especially when a good portion of them aren't coming from homes grounded in morality...

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