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For all the cops/police officers


no1fanofno21

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Im 20 yrs. old and thinking of dropping out of college and becoming a cop. For all the cops and police officers or anyone that just wants to chime in, how long did it take to go through police academy and what were the different types of things, hard and easy that you had to do, also do you enjoy your job now and what type of police officer are you, i want to be a detective someday but understand it takes time to get to that ranking.

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It takes quite a while in some places (like Seattle.) I'm not a cop now and a major reason is that I didn't read up on how to cheat the lie detector test.

Listen to what I'm telling you. It's a fraud, this reliance on this silly test that's been debunked by the National Academy of Science and is not admissable in court. You CAN tell the truth and read deceptive.

And if you are, you're nearly sunk unless they're charitable and give you another go at it.

So, above all, study, get in shape, but learn to beat that test. AFter all, how do you think all those traitors in the CIA and FBI continued to pass secrets and how those psychopathic or corrupt cops made it on the force?

At least you'll be an honest one who beat the stupid test.

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DON'T drop out of college. Stay with it, and get your degree, then apply to become a cop. I'm not a cop, I'm a correctional officer...by choice. I went through the Police Academy back in 2002, and decided that it wasn't for me.

Get your degree. It will be much easier to move up in the ranks, when you already have one. Most agencies strongly encourage that you have some college, and eventually it will probably be set up that in order to be a cop, you atleast have to have a 2 year degree. Most agencies won't hire you now if you don't have SOME college anyway.

Being a cop, or correctional officer is a rewarding, but trying job. If you can get through the day without getting hurt, getting your co-workers hurt, or hurting somebody else. You've had a good day. The work isn't hard, it's the stress of dealing with people, that most normal people never see, that wears you down. If you have thick skin, and a level head. You will be fine. Many people really enjoy the job for the first few years, but then get tired of dealing with it later.

If you want to be a detective, definately get your degree in Criminal Justice, or Criminology. With most agencies, your going to have to do atleast 3 or 4 years on the road to get the transfer to Investigations. Your degree, will help you get picked out of the pack of people trying to get transferred out of Patrol later. :)

Good Luck.

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So, above all, study, get in shape, but learn to beat that test. AFter all, how do you think all those traitors in the CIA and FBI continued to pass secrets and how those psychopathic or corrupt cops made it on the force?

heyyyyy....don't talk bad about the CIA :mad:

although...my dad DID recruit a cuban a long long time ago that passed like 20 different lie detector tests and he turned out to be a double agent....

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although...my dad DID recruit a cuban a long long time ago that passed like 20 different lie detector tests and he turned out to be a double agent....

It's not talking bad about anyone except stupid government agencies that RELY on polygraphs when their effectiveness is as mythical as the unicorn.

Might as well flip a coin, in fact, it increases the chance that psychopaths will gain entry (or those with certain traits--not a good thing.) Probably would be BETTER to flip a coin.

Or here's an idea--do some background investigation. Stop relying on a dumb test that should be thrown in the dustbin along with phrenology.

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I earned my B.S. in Criminal Justice (minor in Sociology) and entered a tough Academy to a large Police Department in Virginia. The Basic Academy took 6 months with an additional 2 months of Field Training with four different Field Training Officers. Once I successfully passed everything I hit the road. My career went very well on the road which included stints as an Academy Instructor (firearms and defensive tactics), Forensic Detective, Violent Crimes Detective and SWAT SNIPER and ultimately Team Leader. I went back to school and earned my Master’s in Public Administration while working tons and tons of OT to make ends meet for my growing family. I went through the ranks and when I became a LT. I applied to the FBI. I was accepted and after a long hard Academy in Quantico I hit the street again. I worked several task forces and did stints across the world during post-911 as an interrogator/polygraph examiner. I completed my Doctorate in Behavioral Science and am currently assigned to a HRT Team based out of Quantico (I missed my SWAT days). I highly recommend law enforcement as a career if you are willing to work hard and understand you will never be “rich”. Marry a woman who understands this and accepts the horrible hours and stress the profession brings. I HIGHLY recommend you stay in school. My education has served me well and promotions and career development (which means more $$$) are based on experience, performance and education. It is tough to go back to school once the kids start coming and the OT money comes a’flowing. Police work in 90% boredom mixed with 10% pure terror and adrenaline. I wouldn’t give it up for the world. Police Departments are hurting for qualified applicants. Seriously think about not leaving school! I wish you all the luck in the world. Stay safe!!!

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It's not talking bad about anyone except stupid government agencies that RELY on polygraphs when their effectiveness is as mythical as the unicorn.

Might as well flip a coin, in fact, it increases the chance that psychopaths will gain entry (or those with certain traits--not a good thing.) Probably would be BETTER to flip a coin.

Or here's an idea--do some background investigation. Stop relying on a dumb test that should be thrown in the dustbin along with phrenology.

well the CIA does do background checks....every 5 years. I had to get am extensive one just to be a summer employee...and the rest of the CIA the clearance process takes much longer. But as for the police academy, who knows.

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. I applied to the FBI. I was accepted and after a long hard Academy in Quantico I hit the street again. I worked several task forces and did stints across the world during post-911 as an interrogator/polygraph examiner.

Hey, you aren't the guy that screwed Ghost out of his job are you? I actually have been poly'd and "backgrounded" by a couple of different agencies and found it all to be pretty straightforward. I would second your advice on the degree, it never hurts. I would also add in that I wouldn't necessarily limit myself to criminal justice etc. Many organizations are looking for a) a degree and B) a technical degree...they'll teach you all the criminal justice type info in their academys

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Re: the polygraph:

I've read that the machine is virtually useless, but that the examiner makes all the difference. Supposedly, like most other typre of expert testimony, there are experts and "experts".

60 Minutes did a story about polygraphs a while back. They called every private eye in NYC that mentioned polygraph in their yellow pages ad. Each one was told that a very expensive portably camera was missing from their news room (false) and that only newsroom employees had access to the room (true). Each examiner polygraphed every employee in the newsroom.

The first examiner said that he couldn't get any evidence of evasion from any of the staffers.

When they hired the second examiner, the person doing the hiring told him that, frankly, management suspected one particular employee, but just couldn't prove it. The examiner concluded that the "fingered" employee was being dishonest with his answers.

For the remaining examiners, the boss fingered a different employee every time. No employee was told that he'd been fingered this week.

Every single examiner found deceptive answers from the fingered employee.

Now, how much scientific validity this has, I'm not sure. The scenario being tested involved a bunch of employees who were all innocent. In fact, every one of them knew that no real theft had occurred, and the examiner was in fact the one being scammed. And every employee had, after a while, a great deal of experience answering the same questions as last week.

But it really did a good job of making me distrust polygraphs.

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