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Buck Owens Died :(


Guest Gichin13

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Guest Gichin13

Great country guitar player. Known to many only from Hee Haw, Buck Owens was a hugely influential song writer and guitar player. Heavily influenced John Fogerty, George Harrison and the Byrds amongst others. RIP.

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Great country guitar player. Known to many only from Hee Haw, Buck Owens was a hugely influential song writer and guitar player. Heavily influenced John Fogerty, George Harrison and the Byrds amongst others. RIP.

Sad, Buck was a great musician. His duets with Dwight Yoakum are some of favorites. Streets of Bakersfield in particular. I would bet that Dwight will do some kind remeberence here before too long. Here's to ya Buck :cheers: .

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Sad, Buck was a great musician. His duets with Dwight Yoakum are some of favorites. Streets of Bakersfield in particular. I would bet that Dwight will do some kind remeberence here before too long. Here's to ya Buck :cheers: .

Very Sad, great musician. I watched Hee Haw every week right after Laugh In. Going to see Dwight Yoakum next month in a small club in St. Pete

www.bakersfield.com/static/FP/baksound/buck.htm

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Dwight Yoakum and Buck Owens share a stage. Photo By Felix Adamo

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Californian staff writer

Buck Owens still owns the Fender Telecaster he bought secondhand in 1951. That old off-white guitar rings as earnestly as ever, but the years have not been altogether kind.

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One night at The Blackboard, the Bakersfield honky-tonk where he played for the better part of a decade, Owens propped his guitar unsteadily against an amp - and then heard it crash to the floor with an electric thud. When he picked it up again he saw that a portion of the ivory “nut” fret at the top of the neck had been chipped away, springing loose a string.

Fiddle player Jelly Sanders stepped in and surveyed the damage.

“He says, ‘You got a comb?’ ” Owens said, recalling that night in 1955 or ‘56. “And I said, ‘Yeah,’ ’cause in those days you carried a comb. And we took out a little piece (of comb-tooth) and stuck it back in there, and wet it with brandy so it would stick. I guess it’s been in there 40 years now.”

A few weeks ago Owens showed the repair job to a guitar technician, who proceeded to volunteer his services: He could make the battered instrument as good as the day Owens bought it off Lewis Talley for half a week’s wages. Owens politely declined.

You don’t trifle with tradition, whether it’s a song or a singer or a guitar. Owens understands that, but it hasn’t always been easy to convince the rest of the world he feels that way. Fortunately, throughout his recording career, Owens rarely cared what the rest of the world (especially Nashville) thought - and most of the time the rest of the world (eventually even Nashville) loved him for it.

But Owens’ mug has turned up on a few Nashville dart boards over the years. Almost always it’s been because he saw enough “country” in a non-country song to make it a country song. That was the case with Chuck Berry’s rock ‘n’ roll standard, “Memphis,” which appeared on Owens’ “Tiger By the Tail” album in March 1965, the very same month Owens placed an advertisement in Nashville’s Music City News proclaiming “I Shall Make No Record That Is Not a Country Record.” And he meant what he said, though he was operating on his own definition of “country,” rather than Nashville’s.

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