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Advice on Teaching Daughter to Drive?


twa

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She got her learners permit and after some instruction in a parking lot I took her to a state park to become familiar with driving. That part went pretty well,so I let her drive to Wal-mart :doh:

I am now drinking heavily :nutkick: ...any suggestions?

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Best advice my dad ever gave me while teaching to to drive was, "its like you've got to be one with the car, imagine it as an extension of yourself while you're driving." I know it sounds corny, but it really helped. When I 1st started driving I was more interested in the pressing the pedals, moving the wheel just right, looking at the speedometer, checking the mirrors, and all the non-important factors of just keeping the thing on the road and not running into anything. Once I felt like the car was kind of a part of me, it seemed a lot more natural to control several tons of steel at high speeds.

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She got her learners permit and after some instruction in a parking lot I took her to a state park to become familiar with driving. That part went pretty well,so I let her drive to Wal-mart :doh:

I am now drinking heavily :nutkick: ...any suggestions?

I think you need to balance making her understand driving safely is a responsibility and a serious thing, and not being intimidating about it. My Dad told me that I may have passed the DMV's test, but I had to pass his as well. There is a huge difference between being able to pass a driving test and being a good driver. I'll give you just one example of an 'expert' point of info vs what a novice learns. When you pull into a turning lane and are going to move across lanes as you turn, a really good driver knows you should never 'pre-turn' your wheel while you're waiting. Thats because, if you should get bumped from behind you'll get shoved right into oncoming traffic (perhaps going full-speed). If you keep your wheel straight, worst case scenario is that you simply get bumped forward or into the car in front of you. But if you watch, more than 1/2 of the folks out there WILL pre-turn their wheel.

Make her pass your test. Its one of the most important things you can do with your kids in my opinion, because not only their life depends on making good decisions and having good habits, but other people's lives do as well.

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I am now drinking heavily :nutkick: ...any suggestions?

Do they sell alchohol at Wal-Mart?

If so, she can drive you to drink. :D

Be patient, keep her off the freeways for a good while, and give her lots of practice.

I guess a driving school is out of the question?

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when i learned how to drive...it was at my school parking lot and my dad just let me drive around the school and stuff....what's there to teach? maybe parking and stuff but she'll probly just get the hang of it if u let her drive around

No offense, but you don't know what you don't know. If you're ever involved in a serious accident (and obviously, I hope you never are) you'll have a lot different attitude. Trust me, I was 17 once, and you are by definition to a certain degree clueless.

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No offense, but you don't know what you don't know. If you're ever involved in a serious accident (and obviously, I hope you never are) you'll have a lot different attitude. Trust me, I was 17 once, and you are by definition to a certain degree clueless.
no offense taken....:D i understand that the way i look at driving is a lot different from u guys since i'm a teen
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It's a time and comfort thing. Don't yell or make her more nervous than she already is. My dad taught me how to drive at a corporate park in my town. Every time I did something even slightly wrong, he'd suddenly yell "BAM!!" at the top of his lungs, and say "That could have been an accident right there." It didn't help, it just made me nervous and caused me to screw up more. Eventually, he did it one too many times, and I just put the car in park, screamed at him, got out, and walked away.

Two months later he finally got me back behind the wheel, and he wasn't such a crazy *******, and I turned out to be a fine driver. It just takes time and patience. Also, if your daughter is at all nervous and uncomfortable, she'll probably resist taking on any real driving challenges. I did. Don't necessarily force her to do something she can't do, but don't be afraid to make her do something she's a little scared of. It builds confidence.

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It's a time and comfort thing. Don't yell or make her more nervous than she already is. My dad taught me how to drive at a corporate park in my town. Every time I did something even slightly wrong, he'd suddenly yell "BAM!!" at the top of his lungs, and say "That could have been an accident right there." It didn't help, it just made me nervous and caused me to screw up more. Eventually, he did it one too many times, and I just put the car in park, screamed at him, got out, and walked away.

Two months later he finally got me back behind the wheel, and he wasn't such a crazy *******, and I turned out to be a fine driver. It just takes time and patience. Also, if your daughter is at all nervous and uncomfortable, she'll probably resist taking on any real driving challenges. I did. Don't necessarily force her to do something she can't do, but don't be afraid to make her do something she's a little scared of. It builds confidence.

hah thats sooo funny!!! was he being serious??

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hah thats sooo funny!!! was he being serious??

Kinda. He was trying to prove a point, trying to scare me into realizing how serious driving mistakes are, and I guess it worked, but it was really counterintuitive. He scared me enough where I just didn't want to drive with him. Problem being, while he's big and scary, he would only yell at me when I screwed up, whereas my little screechy mom would scream at me if I even approached the speed limit. So I like to think I became a good driver despite my odds.

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Let me know how you make out with the driving lessons TWA. My daughter is less then 2 years away from getting a learners permit.

I was lucky. I grew up in a shop, and got to move all sorts of vehicles around at a young age. I was already riding motorcycles (off road), and drove a snow plow truck at 14, and I think it helped me a bit. I remember getting my permit on my 16th birthday, but the roads we had to drive on were pretty wild in my dad's opinion, so I didn't get to drive home.

He also took me to a school parking lot to check me out, and saw that I had the basic skills down fairly well, so we cruised around the back roads of our town for a while. He drilled into me the type of stuff Tarhog is talking about. The next time we went out, he had me go into the busiest part of town, found the smallest parking places, and taught me to park. After about two hours of that, he found the smallest two way street in town:doh:, and taught me the art of the broken K turn.

Four days after I got my permit, he let me drive back to the DMV, and sign up for my road test. I got my licence about 5 weeks after me permit.

I don't know how to go about teaching my daughter when the time comes. There are so many things you learn as you go along. I mean, how do you teach a person how to recover from a slide by counter steering and staying off the brakes? Glad I still have some time to sort this type of stuff out.....

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I don't know how to go about teaching my daughter when the time comes. There are so many things you learn as you go along. I mean, how do you teach a person how to recover from a slide by counter steering and staying off the brakes? Glad I still have some time to sort this type of stuff out.....

I was gonna suggest what my dad did, take me to a parking lot after it snows and just keep doing it until you figure it out....Then i noticed you lived in Florida:doh:

I guess you could go to a big open parking lot during or after it's rained?

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After a couple of stiff drinks it does'nt seem so bad after all,just been a long time since a car ride gave me the shakes .

She is just so different from teaching my son,which was a breeze for the most part.

One example: I told her to slow down and take a left up ahead,she starts to go RIGHT,so I said left...She went STRAIGHT...at a concrete wall.

Needless to say I learned to correct her AFTER she made the turn.

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I was gonna suggest what my dad did, take me to a parking lot after it snows and just keep doing it until you figure it out....Then i noticed you lived in Florida:doh:

While we don't get snow, driving in Florida is excruciatingly difficult. We have the whole idiot-driver/don't-know-enough-English-to-read-roadsigns/too-old-to-be-driving/all-of-the-above populations to worry about. Plus, you can't go 10 miles on the highway without crazy amounts of construction. Plus it ALWAYS rains.

And don't even get me started on Miami, Orlando, Tampa, and Jacksonville traffic. Lemme put it this way; when you're building a highway, and you know traffic is going to be bumper to bumper, going 80 mph, for a good 8 hours out of the day, don't make your lanes so narrow that a Ford Taurus has trouble staying in them. And don't be REbuilding that highway during those 8 hours.

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It's a time and comfort thing. Don't yell or make her more nervous than she already is. My dad taught me how to drive at a corporate park in my town. Every time I did something even slightly wrong, he'd suddenly yell "BAM!!" at the top of his lungs, and say "That could have been an accident right there." It didn't help, it just made me nervous and caused me to screw up more. Eventually, he did it one too many times, and I just put the car in park, screamed at him, got out, and walked away.

This is probably the most important thing, especially with a girl I'd imagine. Be sure when you correct her or explain something to her you do it calmly. If you're teaching her techniques like Tarhog was talking about, make sure you explain to her why you want her to do what you want her to do.

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While we don't get snow, driving in Florida is excruciatingly difficult. We have the whole idiot-driver/don't-know-enough-English-to-read-roadsigns/too-old-to-be-driving/all-of-the-above populations to worry about.

Dave Barry once wrote in his column that his teenager was learning to drive "in Miami, where the roard are always jam packed by an incredible assortment of people, driving at speeds ranging from 'Indianapolis 500' to 'car wash'."

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Advice I'd give a kid (if I had one):

Based on my experience, it's a lot more likely to have an accident in a parking lot than on the open road. (Although parking lot accidents tend to be cheaper.)

Perhaps the trickiest thing to do is to back out of a parking space. You need to remember that the back wheels can only move forward and backward, so it's almost impossible to hit the cars parked next to you with your back wheels. But the car steers by moving the front end sideways, so it's really easy to drag your neighbor with your front bumper while you're looking out the back window.

One "crutch" I found from many years of driving large vehicles (full size vans and pickups), which can often have trouble seeing small cars parked next to you (especially on the passenger side): Electric mirrors can be tilted down so that you can look down the side of your car (you can literally adjust them so that you can see your back wheel, if you want). Now you can tell if that car beside you is 9 inches away, or only two.

Parking tip # 2: In a tight parking space, it's often easier to back in. (Because you can use your mirrors to see straight down the side of the car.) (And, if you back in, then getting out is really easy.)

I'd suggest "parking exercises": Go to an empty parking lot. Try to back into a parking space simply by looking at the stripe on the ground. (It's the same technique as parking next to a car you can only see in the mirror, but if you "hit" the white line it doesn't hurt anything.)

(Only hard part about backing in: How far do you back up?)

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If you check with the Summit Point Race complex in WV they offer car control classes for teen drivers. I think they are an excellent way for teens to understand how to better handle a car and keep it from going out of control, or regaining control if lost. The classes are part classroom part racetrack. They even have a skidpad that will let them feel what happens when a car does lose control and how to regain control or prevent losing it in the first place. The cost used to be about 250.00 not sure what it is now.

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I just got my license about 5 months ago. No tickets or accidents yet. (knock on wood).

First off my dad taught me in a parking lot on stick shift. I now love it.

Secondly after a couple of scary situations I have become much more serious. I think no one can understand how dangerous it is before going through a dangerous situation.

I also think the highway is much easier than normal roads. My biggest problem would be parking. I have to adjust a couple times. I usually park away and pull through a open space.

Shes allowed to be driving with just a permit alone? What happens if she gets pulled over with that? But again going to walmart that shouldn’t be a problem.

Anyways good luck1

and like dave said yelling DOES NOT HELP!

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"Shes allowed to be driving with just a permit alone? What happens if she gets pulled over with that? But again going to walmart that shouldn’t be a problem."

She has to have me or my wife with her...Guess who gets lucky? :laugh:

To begin with she was terrified,Now I think she's having fun scaring me ;)

To her credit she has kept her cool when she messes up.

PCS, I'm too scared to close my eyes

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:logo:

My daughter will be taking DT in September, so I can relate to your concerns...

I would suggest to emphasize the habit of not trusting the mirrors as blind spots will often hide a vehicle next to you. I almost always turn to verify the lane is clear before I change lanes.

I would also discourage attention being paid to radio, music etc... I know it was a big distraction to me when I first learned how to drive... I'm sure it will not be easy as kids at this age are really into their music.

Good luck!

:logo:

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