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CNN.COM: Muslim anger over cartoons spreads


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Muslim anger over cartoons spreads

Sunday, February 5, 2006; Posted: 8:22 a.m. EST (13:22 GMT)

(CNN) -- Islamic anger over newspaper depictions of the Prophet Mohammed is boiling over into violence around the world, with protesters targeting the embassies of countries where the cartoons were published.

Smoke billowed Sunday from the Danish consulate in central Beirut, where hundreds of demonstrators thronged streets around the building to protest a Danish newspaper's publication of cartoons depicting Islam's revered prophet.

Wielding sticks and stones, the demonstrators attacked the building, smashing its windows.

Initially, the army did not appear to be in control, but later deployed hundreds of troops in army personnel carriers to restore order.

Sunday's demonstrations came a day after Muslims in the Syrian capital Damascus torched the Norwegian and Danish embassies.

Newspapers in both countries published images of Islam's Prophet Mohammed, which is banned by Islamic law.

Thousands of angry Muslims also protested in other cities around the world, including Islamabad, Pakistan; Baghdad, Iraq; Khartoum, Sudan; Jakarta, Indonesia; and the Palestinian territories. (Read about one Danish ambassador's meeting with protesters)

Lebanese politicians appealed for order following Sunday's protests.

"We do not accept any act that effects the security of others," said Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. "These groups include people who intended to detroy properties on purpose, giving a bad example of Islam.

"Islam has nothing to do with any of this, no matter how others disrespected the prophets, about whom God says, we have protected you from those who ridicule."

In Afghanistan, the protesters, who chanted anti-Danish slogans and burned a Danish flag in the town of Mihtarlam, about 100 kilometers (60 miles) east of Kabul., were peaceful.

They were demanding prosecution of editors of the Danish newspaper that originally published the cartoons.

Syrian officials denounced Saturday's violence in a television address, and called on protesters to exercise self-restraint, Nidal Kabalan, a Syrian TV executive, told CNN. (Full story)

But the culture editor of the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, which originally published the cartoons five months ago, said there was more to the backlash than simple anger over the drawings.

"I think it's very unfortunate that now Danish interests, Danish buildings are being attacked in Syria, but let me also say that Syria is a police state, and this could not have happened if not the authorities in some way had allowed it to happen," said Flemming Rose, the editor.

A senior Western diplomatic source told CNN the protests must have been permitted by the Syrian government, which apparently felt compelled to allow people to let off steam. However, the source said, things got out of hand.

In contrast, weekend demonstrations in London were peaceful. They occurred for a second consecutive day Saturday outside the Danish embassy, with protesters staying behind security barriers as speakers and placards condemned the cartoons.

"Britain was very responsible," said Asghar Bukari, a member of the Muslim Public Affairs Committee.

"The papers were very responsible, and you can feel it. It's good will among the general Muslim public. They don't feel this us-versus-them tension that's perhaps going around the world and in Europe."

In Pakistan, hundreds of students and teachers took to the streets of Lahore, calling for those responsible for the publication of the cartoons to be executed.

On Friday, Pakistan's government unanimously passed a resolution condemning the cartoons. (Full story)

A newspaper editor in Jordan who was fired after publishing the cartoons in the weekly tabloid Shihan urged Muslims to be reasonable.

"Who offends Islam more?" asked Jihad Momeni. "A foreigner who endeavors to draw the prophet ... or a Muslim with an explosive belt who commits suicide in a wedding party in Amman or elsewhere?"

Iran said Sunday it had recalled its ambassador to Denmark over the publication of the cartoons.

"Iran has summoned its ambassador in Denmark to Tehran," Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi told a news conference, according to Reuters. "Freedoms should be accompanied by responsibility."

Free speech argument

The controversy began last September, when 12 drawings of the Muslim prophet were published in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. It gained strength in January, when a Norwegian newspaper reprinted the drawings.

Jyllands-Posten had published an article about the illustrator of a Danish book on the life of Mohammed, who had demanded to remain anonymous because the book cover depicted the prophet, a sacrilege in Islam.

Some of the images in question were considered to be particularly demeaning, including an image of the Prophet Mohammed wearing a turban shaped like a bomb with a lit fuse.

Following the Norwegian article, other newspapers picked up the story and followed suit by publishing the drawings, including France's Le Monde and Italy's La Stampa.

The week before last, two European newspapers -- Die Welt in Berlin, and France Soir in Paris -- and two small weekly Jordanian newspapers -- Shihan and Al-Mehwar -- reprinted the cartoons and characterized the publications as a matter of free speech.

According to Jordan's Petra News Agency, arrest warrants were issued Saturday for the editors-in-chief of the Jordanian newspapers.

Shihan's editor, Jihad Momeni, who is a former member of the Jordanian Senate, was fired after publishing the cartoons.

Petra reported that Jordan's leader, King Abdullah II, said the publication of such images is a "crime that that can not be justified under freedom of expression."

Demonstrations against the caricatures also occurred in Baghdad; Khartoum, Sudan, and the Palestinian territories.

Pakistan's Foreign Ministry said Saturday it has summoned Denmark's ambassador to the ministry "to lodge a strong protest and demand immediate action by the Danish government against the newspaper."

In a strongly worded statement, a U.S. State Department spokesman said Friday that, despite respect for the freedom of expression, the publication of cartoons that incite religious or ethnic hatreds is unacceptable.

CNN has chosen to not show the cartoons out of respect for Islam.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/02/05/cartoon.protests/index.html

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Any wagers on how long before we hear, "It's a religion of Peace" :)

How about 11:17 am est by you?Self fulfilling prophecy? W/E Violence threatened over a cartoon and I already know that anything that I say to point out how screwed up that is will be shot down. So why fight?

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How about 11:17 am est by you?Self fulfilling prophecy? W/E Violence threatened over a cartoon and I already know that anything that I say to point out how screwed up that is will be shot down. So why fight?

Anyone want to translate... ;)

I think that I got the first two sentences...probably.

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Anyone want to translate... ;)

I think that I got the first two sentences...probably.

Sorry about that. I was pointing out that by asking "Any wagers on how long before we hear, "It's a religion of Peace"" that he infact said it himself nullifying the wager. The rest was just a lament by me about the futilty of making any comment on the muslim reaction to this.

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WTF Is your Problem!!!???

I don't believe he really has a problem, however I will assist in translating his rather cryptic message.

Basically he feels that the violent section of the muslim population has no place in his life.

And further, regarding his 2nd statement, he feels that the prophet Muhammed, may have been withholding some information from his people. Or perhaps, Muhammed did not actually tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth during his sermons.

Does that help ?

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WTF Is your Problem!!!???

He's probably from somewhere in the judeo-christian seats.That belief holds that there is one true god and allah isn't his name. Kinda silly. Not that going bonkers over a derogatory cartoon featuring muhommad isn't a nutjob thing to do. Different dopes for different folks.

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My impression of most Muslim's I know in America has been good. For the most part they enjoy being in this country and come here for the oppurtunity, and I'm sure there is a lot of good done by them...

The problem is the only news we hear about Muslim's around the world are seeing them protest against Israel, participate in suicide bombings and beheadings in Iraq and Afghanistan, trample themselves during trips to Mecca, start uprisings in Thailand and the Phillipines, and now launch massive violent protests and threaten the world because people are not respecting Mohammad. Not to mention sending their children into Jihad wars and suicide bombings and arming them as soon as they turn 3... and taking pictures, and shooting into the air to celebrate 9/11 in some places, bombing the USS Cole, launching attacks in Saudi Arabia, Khobar Towers attack in Riyadh, hi-jackings during the 80s, Pan Am 103 over Scotland, 3/11 in Spain, Bombing the England metro and buses.

It's just hard to overcome all that negative press, and elicits the response you had in the other thread.... something along the lines of "Why are they so stupid!?".

I dare someone to make a listing of all the bad things perpetrated world-wide by Christians over the same timeframe, it wouldn't be half as long. Let me start, OK city bombing, abortion clinic/Olympics/abortion clinic bombing, uprising in Ireland, (maybe) killing a homosexual in Wyoming....

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I dare someone to make a listing of all the bad things perpetrated world-wide by Christians over the same timeframe, it wouldn't be half as long. Let me start, OK city bombing, abortion clinic/Olympics/abortion clinic bombing, uprising in Ireland, (maybe) killing a homosexual in Wyoming....

I do not disagree with you on that. If anything I am much harder on fellow Muslims who condone this behavior going on because they think the US and Isreal "deserve it" And if you have read my posts, you will see I am very much for this war on terror

However, it is rare you ever hear of "positive" Muslims doing good things, i.e people like me, despite all the press releases that go out. It is frustrating because there is far MORE good that we do, and tons and tons of condemnation of these attacks and work going into preventing Muslims for falling for this false message. But it is ignored

And for the life of me, over the past few days I have been sending letters to every Middle East newspaper I can saying how absurd burning down embassies is over a cartoon. If anything it gives these damn cartoons more attention

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I just read the Musharraf stuff... it seems like the Muslim world is split between moderates and extremists. It's hard to tell if the media overplays for the extremist side... if I were a betting man I would say they do. It's better for the media if Americans think that every Muslim is a terrorist and out to get them... not that I'm saying they do this... just pointing it out.

The problem with the moderate-extremist divide is that if 100 moderates come along and create a good impression of Islam, 1 extremist can come along and completely negate all the positive. That's one of the problems I have with organizations like CAIR (and even they have some sketchy terrorist ties). The moderate organizations can create openings in hearts that terrorists come along and exploit.

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The problem with the moderate-extremist divide is that if 100 moderates come along and create a good impression of Islam, 1 extremist can come along and completely negate all the positive. That's one of the problems I have with organizations like CAIR (and even they have some sketchy terrorist ties). The moderate organizations can create openings in hearts that terrorists come along and exploit.

Absolutley. One terrorist can ruin years worth of good work

And the nature of terrorism today is different from the 1970s. That was much more "secular" and "arab nationalist" terror. This is Islamic terror, where these guys are using religion, rather then country, to push the terror buttons

Part of what these organizations have to do is walk a fine line. You cannot be seen as "selling out" because nobody will respect your opinion. That is what has happened to the "Free Muslims" (www.freemuslims.org), they were seen as selling out to the right wing in this country that no other Muslim group will give them legitimacy

It is also the case with govt's in the Middle East. Musharaff and Abdullah have to walk fine lines to stay in power, not piss of the conservatives in their countries, yet project an image to the world that hey we are not savages

Because burning down embassies sends a much louder message then news stories in the press can

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