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How should you react to criticism from your boss?


Ghost of Nibbs McPimpin

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I'm asking because I was recently told about errors and omissions, mere days after a resident whose paperwork I had not dealt with submitted income documentation like a month after she moved in.

Basically, the errors I've made have been simple typoes, generally, but never revenue-killers. Whereas my boss DID make a mistake that cost the company money. I've also caught several computer issues (not anyone's fault at my office) that SAVED money. I've also had to enter a lot of prospect information into the computer that she had initially collected. NO issue with that as much, except when it details a tour, which impacts performance ratings (Close ratio.)

I just think it's kind of lame to point out errors someone else makes, when sometimes they aren't actual errors but delays in completion (like if someone applies at the end of the day) AND when you yourself are guilty of them (and sometimes worse.)

I guess my question is, since I'm looking to advance now after several months of working and handling more duties than were initially planned, how strident should I be in defending my performance? Do I point out the mistakes of my boss to highlight a hypocracy or do I leave that alone?

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Office Politics suck. They never remember the 100 things you do that exceed expectations, they only remember the 1 thing you F'd up.

If you're going to call him on it, just make sure you do it calmly. Getting blown up is a bad idea.........

It does suck, because it's not as if she (and likely to be a she in this industry) is always running me down, but I did forget to do something, but it was for a process I haven't done in like a month and the LAST time I did it, I completed it without prompting.

I won't blow up, that's not my style. It just sucks because, to me, if your going to critique something, how about you NOT be guilty of the same thing?

I can't tell you how many times she wrote a note or asked about something that was perceived as an 'error' that was actually CORRECT. Seriously, at least 10-12 times this has happened and ironically happened today (she's not here, it's why I'm writing on this board lol) I think I should wait to actually verbally talk to her about it though, I don't know.

I won't point out to her that I know every single person's name in the property and their unit number but she still asks people what unit they're in.

:doh:

What's hilarious to me, is that we just had a discussion where I disagreed with implementing pet rent without significantly adjusting our pet-related costs and I found out that a guy I showed an apt to, rented but with a significant reduction in one of his move-in fees (precisely because he complained so much, and rightly so, about the move-in charge.)

Hello?!

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I won't blow up, that's not my style. It just sucks because, to me, if your going to critique something, how about you NOT be guilty of the same thing?

The thing I would say about this is, if there is an error that is being made she should (if she wants improvement) note it so that corrections should be made. However, she should acknowledge at the time that she is correcting you that she is also guilty of the same error and will be trying to improve in this area herself as well.

If she corrects you on it without acknowledging her error, that's just lame.

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The thing I would say about this is, if there is an error that is being made she should (if she wants improvement) note it so that corrections should be made. However, she should acknowledge at the time that she is correcting you that she is also guilty of the same error and will be trying to improve in this area herself as well.

If she corrects you on it without acknowledging her error, that's just lame.

Yes and saying that she technically can refuse to give a commission for a lease if paperwork isn't accurately completed (this is a process, it's not all done in one day and I don't work every day that we're open,) even if she hasn't done so yet, is kinda BS.

And you're right, I have no issue when someone critiques something but then admits they are guilty also and that we all must improve. But I do have a problem when someone has had SO many incidents of correcting something that WASNT wrong or not understanding basics like CONTEXT to actions or 'omissions' that aren't omissions.

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Communicate your feelings. Yes that sounds lame but seriously you won't feel good about the situation unless you do. My advice would just be to tell her that you are concerned that in the context of job evaluation too much attention seems to be focused on mistakes and you feel like your strengths may be under valued. Tell her that you know it may sound like a strange concern to bring up but that you wanted to get her take on it.

Also communicate the issue about errors that are not errors. Be sure that she understands the amount of time this has occured and possibly ask her how she would like you to go about communicating these issues when they come up. You don't after all want to offend her and you want to make sure that things continue to go as smoothly as possible.

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So she lacks good management skills (most of us do), but more than that it probably doesn't have much to do with you, and more about her not having a great day. With that said, don't take it personal, just smile and say 'will do', or 'you got it' and move on. I used to let stuff like that bother me, till I realized that the other person was having an issue and decided not to be a part of that issue.

The best responce I had to a situation such as that one, was when a superintendant for a GC that we were doing a job for out of town, started getting an attitude. He came at the end of the job, on a friday afternoon, when we were packing up to drive 4 hours home. He started nick picking the job. After about the third thing he mentioned, I was starting to get pissed and I thought for a moment and said to myself, If I tell this guy what an a-whole he is, I'll be staying here another day fixing stuff that doesn't need fixed.......

Then I had a brain storm, and I asked him "man, you look like you've had a bad day". He hesitated for a minute and said "you have no idea", then he began to tell me about the crap he had been thru that day for a about 5 minutes. Right after that he smiled and said, "the job looks good, I'm calling the office to have your check ready :cheers:

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Of course bosses and managers make mistakes, and do things incorrectly from time to time.

Everyone does.

But that shouldn't diminish the manager's authority to manage. Nothing will kill a career faster than a reply of "well you did it too!" when your manager calls you on something.

Point is... your manager's job is to manage you. If you make a mistake... he/she would not be doing their job if they didn't call you on it.

That said, it sounds like your manager lacks a little in the employee relations department. Can't help you there. :) But if you like the job, suck it up.

......

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Remember your value as a person and to the company. Do not succumb to her view of the situation. Everybody is human and everybody makes mistakes. You know that and your manager knows that. Of course you will make mistakes sometimes, and so will she. If she is in position to make mistakes that cost company money - she will make those too, just like anybody else would. You cannot blame her for that either.

It is hard to deal with this situation when you are inside of it. Our automatic response is to react with our emotions and dive right into "who did what" and all that.

Her talking to you like that is also a mistake, and she will realize that in time. She is probably stressed out. Do not let her stress dominate the situation.

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But that shouldn't diminish the manager's authority to manage.

Point is... your manager's job is to manage you. If you make a mistake... he/she would not be doing their job if they didn't call you on it.

That said, it sounds like your manager lacks a little in the employee relations department. Can't help you there. :) But if you like the job, suck it up.

......

But if your boss is the only one out of the two of you that's made mistakes that cost money and suffers from misapprehensions regularly?? I mean, to the point where you essentially threaten to start withholding commissions? That, to me, is a problem. Correcting is one thing. But take responsibility for your own ___. If you talk about withholding money from me (and I'm underpaid for what I've been doing anyway) and meanwhile, I take a bunch of extra hours for you cuz your kid gets sick or I switch my schedule to work around your stuff, then that will cause more resentment than merely correcting or reminding someone.

Plus, if you're looking at very near-term advancement (title and raise) and someone doesn't 'get it' that could impact that potential advancement. Being polite, flexible, accomodating and taking on more responsibility than was expected of you only gets you so far.

Thanks for the input, guys. :cheers:

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Ghost if your manager's performance is costing both you and your company money, that is something that should be addressed with the next level of management.

document, document, document, document. Oh yah, and document some more.

......

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Ghost if your manager's performance is costing both you and your company money, that is something that should be addressed with the next level of management.

document, document, document, document. Oh yah, and document some more.

......

What he said. I doubt you're going to get anywhere confronting your immediate supervisor about their own mistakes. If it's that much of an issue, take it to the next level.

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That's exactly why I got into Massage Therapy.

No more office politics. 5-6 patients a day... and go home. Don't bring your work with you.... no bosses counting keystrokes and logging errors in your file and screwing you over on promotions.

And better money.

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That's exactly why I got into Massage Therapy.

No more office politics. 5-6 patients a day... and go home. Don't bring your work with you.... no bosses counting keystrokes and logging errors in your file and screwing you over on promotions.

And better money.

yah but you have to massage back fat. bleah. :)

.....

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All employees should engage in CYA behavior even if they have good managers.

(CYA = cover your ass)

No doubt. Something similar happened with my "Closing ratio" during the summer months. We ended up getting to 100% occupied status (and most of those were my rents) but SOOOOOO many people swamped us, that my closing ratio was not 'standard.' This in spite of the fact we are not the most desirable property in the company portfolio, that I was taking on even more responsibility while my boss got acclimated to the property and the software and that as the months wore on, SURPRISE, we got full and my ratio went up. (It's seasonal. It was only partly my effort or that of my manager. Not to take away credit from myself, but come on. I had great tours that never rented and weak ones that did. There's no accounting for this stuff sometimes.)

I do engage in CYA. You absolutely have to.

I actually think my boss is OK, but I think she's a little rough around the edges. I'm not classist snob, but I nicknamed this "blue collar obliviousness." She's a bit 'insensitive' or 'inappropriate' sometimes. Not all the time or anything, but she's just a little less refined than I am (lol) and that is off-putting too, when someone you know is...well I won't get into that. In any case, residents seem to prefer me to her, but that's another issue. Maybe I should delete all my posts here. STREETS IZ WATCHIN!

She doesn't consistently make those financial mistakes, and sometimes it's the software that forces us to address a discrepancy. It's just that I HAVE NOT MADE ONE error regarding rent or the like, whereas she made one that was over a thou at least. It's kind of hard to swallow talk from someone that cost money, even once.

When she moves on, I'm looking at taking over, unless I get an opportunity with my real estate license I"m working on.

Thank you guys for letting me vent a bit.

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If you don't mind me asking Ghost... what do you do for a living? Or if not comfortable with that... what industry are we talking about?

....

Prop management. I started as a part-timer(though typical for my tenure, two days expanded to four when I was trying to do some things for school.) Now I've grown to like it enough and I'm getting my real estate license this year.

Real Estate is the industry, property management the specific type of business.

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In office politics, and considering the fact that your boss just doesnt have great management skill, I think that if you bring this up, you are going to lose. No matter how nicely you do it, your boss will take offense. And since it seems you like your job, but going into real estate shortly, why risk it? You'll be gone soon anyways. Just call her a dumb c-word behind her back and cope. Managers arent going to take being called a hipocrite litely. She'll just can you. And it'll be incredibly unfair, but it'll still be, and you'll be out of a job. In a perfect world i would agree with Destino up there, about communicating your feelings so you feel better. But is feeling better worth your job?

Thank god i have a boss that leaves me to do my thing. We talk about 1 thing, the Redskins.

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