Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

Philly fans reputation.


Sherlock Holmes

Recommended Posts

they boo santa claus, they cheer when a player gets injured, if you are an opposing fan they do not stop giving you ****, if you've been to fedex it is 100x worse

that's the gist of it, but don't forget they have been known to throw batteries at players and fans in the past.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ridgely

They are vicious,don't kid yourself. I went on a bus trip once and Washington won,they were pounding and rocking the bus and as it pulled away threw bottles at it.Pretty scary and this was in the 70's. They did'nt have a holding cell at the Vet for nothing.I would travel in a group at ALL times.Doc Walker said on the radio,some of the players don't even let their families go the the games in Philly. Baseball isn't too bad. But hockey and football,look out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My sis went to a game at RFK and was talking to the Chief guy. She got her picture with him, and said he told her some of the fans at Philly beat him up one day. They beat up the Chief!! Poor old fella.

I can't paint all Philly fans with one broad brush, but it sounds like it gets pretty bad there. My thoughts are it might not be as bad this week because there is no playoff at stake for Philly, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that's the gist of it, but don't forget they have been known to throw batteries at players and fans in the past.

Not to mention they beat up fans of the opposing team that are not traveling in a group. I've been to a couple Eagles games at the Linc cuz I live so close, and I personally have seen a group of Eagles fans jump a guy in a Ray Lewis jersey who was walking all by himself, and at another game a guy wearing Vikings horns and a Culpepper jersey, again all by himself, got his ass kicked by like 10 guys.

The Eagles security guards barely care at all.

So my advice: TRAVEL IN PACKS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So whats up with Philly's fans thats gotten them this bad rep??

They are actually the only stadium to have a holding cell located on its premises. If you're going just listen to them b*tch at you. Most likely they aren't going to do anything, they're mostly talk. Besides, Philly fans get a lot of sh*t at FedEx Field.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When Michael Irvin was injured (i think his final game was against Philly) apparently as he lay on the field with the paramedic guys checking him the fans were whooping and hollering that day. It sucks royally in my opinion but i guess that for every good person in the world there has to be an *******.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My sis went to a game at RFK and was talking to the Chief guy. She got her picture with him, and said he told her some of the fans at Philly beat him up one day. They beat up the Chief!! Poor old fella.

Very true story.. not only did they beat him up, they broke one (or maybe both) of his legs. At the time, he had no insurance and the Redskins paid for his medical bills. When the strike season happened and we had the replacement players, he didn't cross the picket line to attend the games for that reason... the support the Redskins had shown him after that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some samples:

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/09/14/Bucs/Eagles_fans_reach_the.shtml

On Tuesday [sept. 2003], during his regular weekly radio show, Joe Jurevicius related comments made to him during pregame warmups for Monday's game between the Bucs and Eagles. Philadelphia fans were yelling at Joe, "Where is your son" and "How's your son?"

How low and despicable someone must be to use the death of a newborn child in an attempt to psychologically undermine an athlete before a sporting event. We all knew the Philadelphia fans were low-brow, but that set the bar at a new low.

-------------------------------------

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=nfl&id=1969132

Quarterback Daunte Culpepper was fuming about the way he said his wife was treated in the stands.

"You can boo, you can have fun with it, but when it comes to the point where you're throwing stuff and spitting on people, it's disrespectful," Culpepper said. "That's how people really get hurt. Lord knows, if I would've been up there, somebody definitely would've gotten hurt."

-------------------------------------

http://www.wjla.com/news/stories/0105/203568.html

Those famously churlish Philly fans can't hide behind the urban legends. The truth is out there: They simply booed Santa Claus. Frank Olivo - the erstwhile Santa in question - wasn't drunk, nor was his red suit in tatters that December day in 1968 when he walked onto the field for the halftime show, only to be met by a chorus of jeers and a snowball fusillade from Eagles fans.

-------------------------------------

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/eagles/2005-02-07-philly-fans_x.htm

And as expected, the fans had plenty of passion — sometimes too much. Shortly after the game ended, a small group of Eagles fans hurled plastic beer bottles at a contingent of Patriots fans celebrating at Jacksonville Landing, an outdoor downtown entertainment hub. A bit of pushing and shoving ensued; it was quickly broken up with the help of pepper spray used by police officers.

-------------------------------------

http://football.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,9753,1660884,00.html

Comparison of Philly fans and soccer hooliganism...

-------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_Eagles

Poor judgment and alcohol have occasionally led some Eagles fans to transgress the boundaries of civilized behavior. Such behavior is familiar to many who have attended professional sporting events virtually anywhere in the world, but Eagles fans have had the misfortune to misbehave in numerous high profile moments, many on national television. As such, Eagles fans have a reputation in many quarters as being unduly rowdy, or even dangerous. Some instances of fan misconduct stand out for their sheer outlandishness, and the atmosphere at Eagles' home games bears greater similarity to the intense atmosphere at European soccer stadiums than it does the typical American sporting event; in fact, Eagles fans have been compared unfavorably to European soccer hooligans by the media [1].

The most (in)famous example of fan impropriety at Eagles games is the so-called "Santa Claus Incident," on December 15, 1968, at Franklin Field, in which angry fans, furious at the conclusion of yet another wasted season under head coach Joe Kuharich (including losing their first 11 games, then winning the next two, preventing the team from getting the first pick in the next year's draft, O.J. Simpson), booed and threw snowballs at a man dressed as Santa Claus during the halftime show.

Frank Olivo, a 20 year-old that had been drafted from the stands as an ad hoc replacement for the scheduled Santa, was the target of the crowd's anger. As Olivo recounts, fans threw snowballs at him after he reached the end zone, shouting that he made a poor Santa. Olivo, in turn, pointed to a culprit, instructing them that they'd have empty stockings that Christmas. This led to more snowballs. Subsequently, a legend was born.

Exaggeration is unnecessary, there being many real examples that serve to support such an argument. Recent examples include:

* A 1997 Monday Night Football game against the San Francisco 49ers in which, infuriated by a series of calls by the officials and poor play by the Eagles, fans engaged in a number of highly visible, large-scale brawls on national television. In the last quarter, one fan fired a flare gun across the stadium into empty seats in the 700 level. Fans entering home Eagles games have been subject to pat-down searches at entry by stadium security ever since.

* A contingent of Eagles fans traveled to the 1999 NFL Draft in New York for the sole purpose of jeering the Eagles selecting anyone other than Heisman Trophy winning running back Ricky Williams. Local radio hosts had recruited the boorishly behaving crew to protest the selection, which turned out to be future Pro-Bowl quarterback Donovan McNabb. McNabb stayed composed during the incident, and the thirty or so fans who booed him were subsequently derided as the "Dirty Thirty," while the radio hosts in question were widely criticized for their roles as instigators. McNabb has since become one of Philadelphia's most beloved sports icons.

* During a 1999 game against the hated Dallas Cowboys, Cowboys wide receiver (and bete noire of Eagle fans) Michael Irvin was knocked unconscious when his head was driven into Philadelphia's hard turf-covered cement field after a catch. As Irvin lay prostrate and immobile on the turf, Eagles fans cheered the injury. Irvin was ultimately diagnosed with a broken neck, and the injury ended his career.

Acts of violence by Eagles fans against fans of visiting teams, combined with ongoing difficulties relating to public drunkenness, prompted Philadelphia municipal judge Seamus McCaffrey and the Philadelphia Police Department to establish a small, in-stadium courtroom at the Vet in 1997. Additionally, plainclothes officers, dressed in the colors of the visiting team, were dispatched to sit in sections known as being dangerous to opposing fans, most such sections being located in the Vet's notorious "700 Level" at the top of the stadium. The success of the program was widely noted and has continued to the present day (Lincoln Financial Field includes a built-in prison facility and courtroom for such purposes). Eagle fans caught by such sting operations are arrested, charged and taken to the courtroom, where McCaffrey usually sits in judgment. Such efforts have made the inside of the stadium much safer for opposing fans than was previously the case.

-------------------------------------

and the list goes on and on....

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was at the wild card game in '90 when we beat them 20-6. I taped paper over the Redskins sticker on my truck window. When the game entered the 4th quarter, many Iggles fans were heading for the exits, and the remaining Redskins fans were gathering in some sections singing "HTTR"! It was a lot of fun walking out of that stadium in a group of about 50 Skins fans, because the Iggles fans couldn't do anything to a group that large. But as I was getting in my truck to leave, some idiot pushed my drivers side mirror in with his hand. He did it very half-heartedly, like he didn't care either way, but he was expected to do something dumb to keep up the reputation.

I also went to an Eagles-Raiders game in 2001, and there were so many Raiders fans that the Iggles fans seemed intimidated. They were like sheep that day, at least in the sections I was in and around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have heard all the stories of fans in Philadelphia and the get no sympathy from me for those 3 NFC Championship and Super Bowl loss. There is creating a home field advantage and razzing visiting fans but in Philly it is way to far.

They are classess and I don't know who I can't stand more Violent Eagle Fans or the fairweather / bandwagon fans that support the Cowboys when they are doing good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some samples:

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/09/14/Bucs/Eagles_fans_reach_the.shtml

On Tuesday [sept. 2003], during his regular weekly radio show, Joe Jurevicius related comments made to him during pregame warmups for Monday's game between the Bucs and Eagles. Philadelphia fans were yelling at Joe, "Where is your son" and "How's your son?"

How low and despicable someone must be to use the death of a newborn child in an attempt to psychologically undermine an athlete before a sporting event. We all knew the Philadelphia fans were low-brow, but that set the bar at a new low.

.

This is sick...

As a parent with two sons - I could not imagine someone saying things like that to me. It is also hard for me to imagine the ability to keep cool that Jurevicius had when he heard that.

You can only assume that those guys yelling that were dunk, stupid and not parents. How could a parent yell that to a father who lost his son?

I know that these stories are examples of a few "bad apples" but it is hard not to loath all things Eagles.

Go SKINS! :logo:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some samples:

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/09/14/Bucs/Eagles_fans_reach_the.shtml

On Tuesday [sept. 2003], during his regular weekly radio show, Joe Jurevicius related comments made to him during pregame warmups for Monday's game between the Bucs and Eagles. Philadelphia fans were yelling at Joe, "Where is your son" and "How's your son?"

How low and despicable someone must be to use the death of a newborn child in an attempt to psychologically undermine an athlete before a sporting event. We all knew the Philadelphia fans were low-brow, but that set the bar at a new low.

That is just wrong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So whats up with Philly's fans thats gotten them this bad rep??

Well, for starters, they beat up Chief Z one year so bad that they broke his leg & put him in the hospital. They have booed Santa Claus, they throw batteries & snowballs with rocks at opposing team fans, they start fights with ANYONE, they cheer when opposing team players get hurt on their field...mind you, not all Eagles fans are like this. But, it IS a lot of them that make the rest look bad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some samples:

http://www.sptimes.com/2003/09/14/Bucs/Eagles_fans_reach_the.shtml

On Tuesday [sept. 2003], during his regular weekly radio show, Joe Jurevicius related comments made to him during pregame warmups for Monday's game between the Bucs and Eagles. Philadelphia fans were yelling at Joe, "Where is your son" and "How's your son?"

How low and despicable someone must be to use the death of a newborn child in an attempt to psychologically undermine an athlete before a sporting event. We all knew the Philadelphia fans were low-brow, but that set the bar at a new low.

-------------------------------------

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=nfl&id=1969132

Quarterback Daunte Culpepper was fuming about the way he said his wife was treated in the stands.

"You can boo, you can have fun with it, but when it comes to the point where you're throwing stuff and spitting on people, it's disrespectful," Culpepper said. "That's how people really get hurt. Lord knows, if I would've been up there, somebody definitely would've gotten hurt."

-------------------------------------

http://www.wjla.com/news/stories/0105/203568.html

Those famously churlish Philly fans can't hide behind the urban legends. The truth is out there: They simply booed Santa Claus. Frank Olivo - the erstwhile Santa in question - wasn't drunk, nor was his red suit in tatters that December day in 1968 when he walked onto the field for the halftime show, only to be met by a chorus of jeers and a snowball fusillade from Eagles fans.

-------------------------------------

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/eagles/2005-02-07-philly-fans_x.htm

And as expected, the fans had plenty of passion — sometimes too much. Shortly after the game ended, a small group of Eagles fans hurled plastic beer bottles at a contingent of Patriots fans celebrating at Jacksonville Landing, an outdoor downtown entertainment hub. A bit of pushing and shoving ensued; it was quickly broken up with the help of pepper spray used by police officers.

-------------------------------------

http://football.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,9753,1660884,00.html

Comparison of Philly fans and soccer hooliganism...

-------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_Eagles

Poor judgment and alcohol have occasionally led some Eagles fans to transgress the boundaries of civilized behavior. Such behavior is familiar to many who have attended professional sporting events virtually anywhere in the world, but Eagles fans have had the misfortune to misbehave in numerous high profile moments, many on national television. As such, Eagles fans have a reputation in many quarters as being unduly rowdy, or even dangerous. Some instances of fan misconduct stand out for their sheer outlandishness, and the atmosphere at Eagles' home games bears greater similarity to the intense atmosphere at European soccer stadiums than it does the typical American sporting event; in fact, Eagles fans have been compared unfavorably to European soccer hooligans by the media [1].

The most (in)famous example of fan impropriety at Eagles games is the so-called "Santa Claus Incident," on December 15, 1968, at Franklin Field, in which angry fans, furious at the conclusion of yet another wasted season under head coach Joe Kuharich (including losing their first 11 games, then winning the next two, preventing the team from getting the first pick in the next year's draft, O.J. Simpson), booed and threw snowballs at a man dressed as Santa Claus during the halftime show.

Frank Olivo, a 20 year-old that had been drafted from the stands as an ad hoc replacement for the scheduled Santa, was the target of the crowd's anger. As Olivo recounts, fans threw snowballs at him after he reached the end zone, shouting that he made a poor Santa. Olivo, in turn, pointed to a culprit, instructing them that they'd have empty stockings that Christmas. This led to more snowballs. Subsequently, a legend was born.

Exaggeration is unnecessary, there being many real examples that serve to support such an argument. Recent examples include:

* A 1997 Monday Night Football game against the San Francisco 49ers in which, infuriated by a series of calls by the officials and poor play by the Eagles, fans engaged in a number of highly visible, large-scale brawls on national television. In the last quarter, one fan fired a flare gun across the stadium into empty seats in the 700 level. Fans entering home Eagles games have been subject to pat-down searches at entry by stadium security ever since.

* A contingent of Eagles fans traveled to the 1999 NFL Draft in New York for the sole purpose of jeering the Eagles selecting anyone other than Heisman Trophy winning running back Ricky Williams. Local radio hosts had recruited the boorishly behaving crew to protest the selection, which turned out to be future Pro-Bowl quarterback Donovan McNabb. McNabb stayed composed during the incident, and the thirty or so fans who booed him were subsequently derided as the "Dirty Thirty," while the radio hosts in question were widely criticized for their roles as instigators. McNabb has since become one of Philadelphia's most beloved sports icons.

* During a 1999 game against the hated Dallas Cowboys, Cowboys wide receiver (and bete noire of Eagle fans) Michael Irvin was knocked unconscious when his head was driven into Philadelphia's hard turf-covered cement field after a catch. As Irvin lay prostrate and immobile on the turf, Eagles fans cheered the injury. Irvin was ultimately diagnosed with a broken neck, and the injury ended his career.

Acts of violence by Eagles fans against fans of visiting teams, combined with ongoing difficulties relating to public drunkenness, prompted Philadelphia municipal judge Seamus McCaffrey and the Philadelphia Police Department to establish a small, in-stadium courtroom at the Vet in 1997. Additionally, plainclothes officers, dressed in the colors of the visiting team, were dispatched to sit in sections known as being dangerous to opposing fans, most such sections being located in the Vet's notorious "700 Level" at the top of the stadium. The success of the program was widely noted and has continued to the present day (Lincoln Financial Field includes a built-in prison facility and courtroom for such purposes). Eagle fans caught by such sting operations are arrested, charged and taken to the courtroom, where McCaffrey usually sits in judgment. Such efforts have made the inside of the stadium much safer for opposing fans than was previously the case.

-------------------------------------

and the list goes on and on....

.

I underestimated them, wow

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...