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a trip down memory lane. Top 50 gadgets....


aREDSKIN

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http://pcworld.com/resource/printable/article/0,aid,123950,00.asp

Man I have forgotten about some of these things, interesting.

1. Sony Walkman TPS-L2 (1979)

Click to view full-size image. Portable music players are so cheap and ubiquitous today that it's hard to remember when they were luxury items, widely coveted and often stolen. But when the blue and silver Walkman debuted in 1979, no one had ever seen anything quite like it. The $200 player virtually invented the concept of "personal electronics."

The first Walkman (also branded as the Stowaway, the Soundabout, and the Freestyle before the current name stuck) featured a cassette player and the world's first lightweight headphones. Apparently fearful that consumers would consider the Walkman too antisocial, Sony built the first units with two headphone jacks so you could share music with a friend. The company later dropped this feature. Now, more than 25 years and some 330 million units later, nobody wonders why you're walking down the street with headphones on. Learn more in Sony's history of the Walkman. PCW photo by Rick Rizner; Walkman courtesy of Melissa Perenson.

The Top 50 Tech Gadgets

Introduction to PC World's 50 Greatest Gadgets, Plus the #1 Gadget

Greatest Gadgets #2-#10

Greatest Gadgets #11-#20

Greatest Gadgets #21-#30

Greatest Gadgets #31-#40

Greatest Gadgets #41-#50

The Complete List of PC World's 50 Greatest Gadgets

PC World's 50 Greatest Gadgets, by Decade

2. Apple iPod (2001)

Click to view full-size image. If the Walkman is the aging king of portable media players, Apple's iPod is prince regent. It rules the realm of digital music like no other device: According to the NPD Group, more than eight out of ten portable players sold at retail by mid-2005 were iPods. Yet when the $399 iPod first appeared in October 2001, it was nothing special. It featured a 5GB hard drive and a mechanical scroll wheel, but worked only with Macs. A second model released the following July offered a 20GB hard drive, a pressure-sensitive touch wheel, and a Windows-compatible version. But the third-generation player, which appeared in April 2003, proved the charm: A 40GB drive, built-in compatibility with Windows and Mac, support for USB connections, and a host of other small improvements made it wildly popular, despite its relatively high price and poor battery life. Now the fifth-generation iPod threatens to do the same thing for a new breed of portable video players. The iPod is dead; long live the iPod. Read more in Dennis Lloyd's Brief History of the iPod. PCW photo by Rick Rizner; iPod courtesy of Michael Kubecka.

continued....

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