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How about a no-huddle offense


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Thinking about what new wrinkles Spurrier may install now that practices are closed . . . . How about a no-huddle offense?

My understanding is that pass plays are hardest (physically) on the WRs, CBs and DL. Since we have so much WR depth, a WR rotation during games could keep our WR legs fresh. We could have a "slow" no-huddle offense in which Spurrier calls the plays as the team lines up and a WR rotates in, the QB calls an audible as necessary, and the offense wears down the defense with repeated pass plays.

The downside to this approach is that short drives (especially 3-and-outs) would put our defense back on the field with even shorter rest. But, hopefully, that would be following a TD by our offense. :)

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It would be a good idea, especially with the type of "call the play according to the defense" that we run. It would fit Danny like a glove, who's the fastest thinker and most intelligent of our QBs. Having the defense off guard will help compensate for passes which he may loft out there because of his weak arm.

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Originally posted by OrangeSkin

It would be a good idea, especially with the type of "call the play according to the defense" that we run. It would fit Danny like a glove, who's the fastest thinker and most intelligent of our QBs.

Exactly. This is the thought that I forgot to include in my post. The strength of Spurrier's system, Spurrier's playcalling, and Wuerffel as a QB is all mental -- they out-think the defense.

Just like any test (think SATs), the difference between top mental performers and the rest expands, the shorter time there is for the test. If you really want to know who is smart, cut the time for a test in half.

Defenses would be stuck with basic nickel personnel, getting more winded by the play, without a lot of help by the DC.

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One possible problem with the no-huddle rotation idea:

I think the NFL has some kind of rule: If the offense makes a substitution, then you have to allow enough time for the D to make one, too. (I admit, I don't know exactly how it works, but I think, if you send in a player, then you can't snap the ball for so many seconds).

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The only substitution rule I'm aware of is the one that relates to the "too many in the huddle" penalty. You can only have 11 men in the huddle. This prevents running 15 guys out there and leaving the defense in the dark as to what personnel are out there until they can see who runs off of the field . . . presumably the moment just before the ball is snapped.

The no-huddle would eliminate this problem to my understanding by not having a huddle of course, but also by simply having 2 WR's run on when 2 WR's run off. No big deal.

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Doesn't the substitute have to come inside the hash marks first, or something like that?

I think there's a rule in place so a team can't have a guy lurk on the sidelines and then sneak him barely on the field right before the ball is snapped.

In short, I don't think the offense will be able to shuttle players in and out w/o the defense doing so, too.

And the Redskins showed during SB 26 against the Bills that you can substitute defenders against a "slow" no-huddle offense.

That doesn't mean the no-huddle wouldn't be a good idea, though. It would give the opposing D less time to adjust to Spurrier's O. I expect to see a fair bit of it this season.

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What you are referring to has already been worked on some in training camp. Remember the "sugar offense" of the Bengals under Boomer E .... I saw them running something similar on two different occasions. they would have a huddle but were able to get to the line quickly if the defense tried to substitute. Maybe I was totally misreading what was going on... (some wacked out drill maybe) but during 11 on 11 light contact scrimmages, they did it on 2 drives on 2 different days that I saw. The Defense got caught once trying to sub and they bolted to the line and hiked the ball.

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Originally posted by SonnyJ

And the Redskins showed during SB 26 against the Bills that you can substitute defenders against a "slow" no-huddle offense.

Right, but Spurrier's offense is almost always in a passing formation (though the exact formation varies). There's less messing around with down-and-distance situational substitutions.

If we've got 5 starting-quality WRs, and the defense has only 2 or 3 good CBs for their nickel package, that's a huge advantage to us to have fresh WR legs on nearly every play. (Plus the CB has to make a mental adjustment to think about the different tendencies of each WR.)

As for the DL, they'll be sucking wind after 4 - 5 no-huddle pass plays. This will tend to help our anemic interior OL, since it's easier to pass-block repeatedly than it is to rush the passer repeatedly.

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I like the no-huddle as a change of pace. Sometimes it shakes things up against a defense that has so far stifled you in a game. It also forces the defense to practice a prepare for a new type of offense and new type of substitution, making their preparation for your team more complicated.

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As far as I'm concerned Spurrier runs a hybrid no huddle offense. The QB's make a call at the line based on the defensive set. Obviously, the main difference would be the amount of time the defense has to set up. Once again the way the defense is set dictates what play we call, so I don't know how great an advantage that would be to us. Unless the other defense is out of shape, I think we should save the no huddle for time strapped situations........:bow:

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I've always felt that a no-huddle, done effectively, is a great way to keep a D off balance and guessing. with our WR's we should be able to take advantage of some tired DB's after a few times.

And who better to implement a no-huddle than SS

BOOOYYAAAA

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Months ago I saw an article about Spurrier (believe it or not) and the writer from an Orlando paper was asking him about there being fewer plays in the NFL than in college and Spurrier said that using the no-huddle was one way to get more plays. It's obvious that getting a lot of plays for his offense is one thing Spurrier likes to do.

I'd say it's definitely in the mix for non-2 minute situations, but how much it will be used is questionable.

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