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For all you Jews and Catholics


Cdowwe

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I recently finished up a class on Judaism and Catholicism in America. The professors point of the class is that both religions have in some ways Americanized. That American culture has had effects on both of them. Seeing that I am not of either religion, I just wondered what all you that are Jewish or Catholic, or both (who knows) think about this.

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I recently finished up a class on Judaism and Catholicism in America. The professors point of the class is that both religions have in some ways Americanized. That American culture has had effects on both of them. Seeing that I am not of either religion, I just wondered what all you that are Jewish or Catholic, or both (who knows) think about this.

for the majority of america this is correct. As a student of both judaism & christianity without question it has become to western.

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I definately think secularism, westernism, and Americanism has had an impact on how Judaism is practised, but culture always has had an impact on how Judaism could be practiced. Also, since the diaspora (sp) Judaism is practised somewhat differently because it grew up in several different regions simultaneously. In some ways it's no different than the adoption of the Christmas tree, or other incorporations of indigenous beliefs into Christian practice.

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Catholocism in-general is pretty Westernized and has been for quite some time. Eastern Orthodoxy is still (duhhh... ) far less so, even though both share the same origins.

However...

There are many Eastern-Rite Catholic Churchs which haven't become so Westernized. The Melkites, Maronites, Greek Catholics, etcetera fall into that category.

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Sans America, there probably would not be Reform Judaism to the extent that it's now practiced...which is what many, many American Jews practice...there's definitely some truth to what your professor said.

Without America NO form of Judiasm would be practiced to the extent it's practiced now. I truly believe that America has saved the religion from being a footnote in the history books. So of course American culture has had an effect on Judaism. As an American Jew I feel like I am an American first and a Jew second. I don't think that belief has ever been prevalent in any other country.

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Culture, Government, and laws will have a compromissing affect on religeon, mostly when they are in conflict. The people will have to choose between

where to 'fit-in' with culture, or stand with religeon. And when the number of parishioners decline, then the religeons may choose to compromise on smaller issues. For example, the Catholic church allowed folk musicians to play during Mass. Now every part of the Mass is sung. I'm old school and long for the days when The Mass was mostly spoken in Latin by the Priest, and he did all of the singing (more like chanting), it gave the Mass that

medieval charm. The good old days. At least the cathedral I attend is visited by the Bishop regularly. He keeps it real :laugh: I guess that wasn't a good example, oh well.

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Without America NO form of Judiasm would be practiced to the extent it's practiced now. I truly believe that America has saved the religion from being a footnote in the history books. So of course American culture has had an effect on Judaism. As an American Jew I feel like I am an American first and a Jew second. I don't think that belief has ever been prevalent in any other country.

That fair Henry. In thinking about the other outposts where Jews might have lived had there been no America, it's hard for me to think of many. Some were in Palestine, some where in still in certain parts of Europe, but aside from some random other sites around the world, there was no other place, save Israel, that would have bolstered and supported the Jews.

The notion of self that you mention is what divides Jewry in the US (not that there is any tangible dissension, per se). Some Orthodox and some Hassidim (including some of the Lubuvichers) have the opposite concept and retain the classical Judaism first/no nationalism that was bolstered by so many years of continual persecution no matter the country that they happened to inhabit.

The fact that you have that notion and that it's so widespread (and I should note, that I too describe myself in the same way), is part of why Judaism has moved to more of a culture than of a religion. I think this is evident in the amount of time that many people who consider themselves Jews spend at a synagogue in any given year or that use tefellin and wear tzi tzi, etc. Many, many American Jews are Rosh Hashanah/Yom Kippur much the same way that many Christians are "Easter/Christmas."

In America, religion, for many Jews, is secondary to other interests, even though it remains a core source of identity.

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Although being a Catholic is somewhat cultural, particularly if you come from a large Catholic family, the cultural heritage of the Jewish faith seems be much stronger. In spite or our melting pot society Irish, Italian, Greek, and Philipino Catholics all carry their distinct cultural characteristics. The Jewish cultural characteristics appear to transcend nationality. If you read about the history of the Jews though it isn't surprising because before the Jews were forced out of their homelands religion and government and social custom were all intermingled and religious leaders influenced everything.

One impact that America has had on Catholicism is that God has become a Notre Dame fan. :D

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