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Has anyone here tried absinthe?


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Good article written on it in Wired mag.

about the buzz:

"It's like an herbal speedball," he says. "Some of the compounds are excitatory, some are sedative. That's the real reason artists liked it. Drink two or three glasses and you can feel the effects of the alcohol, but your mind stays clear - you can still work."

About the making you go crazy stuff:

In a 1989 Scientific American article, an American biochemist named Wilfred Arnold hypothesized that Van Gogh's insanity (acute intermittent porphyria, he speculated) was caused by the thujone in absinthe. Based on the description of raw materials used to make the liqueur, Arnold calculated that the thujone content was a dangerous 250 parts per million. "I would advise not drinking it," he says.

Breaux rejects Arnold's methodology. "He didn't take the effects of the distillation process into account," Breaux says. "He made a WAG - a wild-assed guess." Breaux wanted to settle the thujone question once and for all. And he was uniquely positioned to do so. "Back when the original was around, they didn't have any decent analytical chemistry. And when Arnold performed his research, he didn't have any samples of the original liqueur. I have both," he says.

At the EASI lab, Breaux ran tests on the pre-ban absinthe samples, as well as on samples spiked with thujone (from the very bottle I had sniffed). This allowed him to isolate the toxic compound. He spent his free time studying the test results, and late one night in June 2000 he had his answer. "I was stunned. Everything that I had been told was complete nonsense." In the antique absinthes he had collected, the thujone content was an order of magnitude smaller than Arnold's predictions. In many instances, it was a homeopathically minuscule 5 parts per million.

Breaux went public with his findings, but not in a peer-reviewed scholarly journal. "Here I am with just a bachelor's in microbiology. I knew I could be tarred and feathered." Instead, he posted his test results in the discussion threads at La Fee Verte, an online gathering place for absinthe geeks. Flame wars erupted, and Breaux cited his research to buttress his point about thujone concentrations. The site's moderator eventually dubbed him "elite absinthe enforcer."

Breaux's conclusions were vindicated in early 2005, when a food-safety group working for the German government tested pre-ban absinthe. Dirk Lachenmeier, who ran the study (called "Thujone - Cause of Absinthism?") concluded that absinthe is not any more harmful than other spirit drinks. But the biggest vindication came at the Absinth des Jahres contest in 2004, for which expert judges sampled newly distilled absinthes from all over the world. A little-known candidate, Nouvelle-Orléans, garnered perfect scores and won a gold medal. "Without doubt, the release of Nouvelle-Orléans was a milestone in the history of modern absinthe," says Arthur Frayn, one of the judges. The distiller? Ted Breaux.

"You can read a paragraph or two on how to make wine, but that doesn't mean you're going to make Chateau Latour," says Breaux. "What I've done is, I've made a Chateau Latour." In the process of proving that absinthe wasn't insanity-inducing poison, he had cracked its code. He'd sourced the concentrations of all the herbs it contained and even traced them to their original regions of cultivation. He knew precisely which classes of wine spirits those herbs were combined with. Making and marketing his own brand was the next logical step. "Nouvelle-Orléans is part vintage absinthe, part Ted Breaux, and part New Orleans flair," he says.

Read the entire article here.

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Yes, but not the kind with wormwood (which is near impossible to find, legally or illegally). It's strong (75% I think?), but has kind of a licorice-type aftertaste. I like it, it's got a good kick and reminds me of Jager, one of the few liquors I can stand anymore.

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Yes, but not the kind with wormwood (which is near impossible to find, legally or illegally). It's strong (75% I think?), but has kind of a licorice-type aftertaste. I like it, it's got a good kick and reminds me of Jager, one of the few liquors I can stand anymore.

Well I don't think it's hard to find even with wormwood just do a google search.

http://www.greenfairy.org/

http://www.absinth.com/

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I have tried it. I got a bottle of 1792 from Greenfairy.org. 1792 is the stuff with like 10 times the amount of wormwood or thujone or whatever the stuff is called (no sense in effing around right?) $125 a bottle or so. Me and 5 friends split the bottle. We got nicely wasted, but instead of just being drunk, it also made us a just really silly and goofy and retarded. Hard to explain it, but definitely way different than just getting drunk off beers.

I recommend it if you want to have a different kind of buzz, but actually drinking the liquid is tough....it tastes like s***. We tried the method were you soak a sugar cube in the booze and light it on fire on a spoon until it all drips into the glass. It tastes like a urinal cake smells. Then again, the first time I had whiskey, I thought I was drinking jet fuel.

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I tried some of that nasty stuff twice, just to make sure I wasn't imagining things. Blech...

My Stepbrother got some French stuff when he was in Germany a couple years ago. When you watered it down a bit and added sugar, it almost tasted like a stale minty drink. The sensation was different. I felt drunk, but my motor skills weren't adversely affected like if I had been drinking wine, beer, etcetera. Weird. I tried it again to see if that was the case and the same thing happened. Haven't touched it since.

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I've never tried it, but if its like mesq or shrooms results could vary person to person as it contains a toxin, which could likely make you sick or do some

stupid stuff. probably better off without it. :2cents:

"As its popularity grew, so did public hysteria over its mysterious effects. Absinthe was the subject of many studies into alcoholism, at the time it was referred to as Absinthism. Its use was even considered a ticket to the insane asylum. In August 1905, Jean Lanfray, a Swiss farmer and known absinthe drinker, shot his entire family."

"The essential oils in wormwood contains the chemical Thujone, which is a toxin. when taken in large amounts. Thujone is said to be responsible for Absinthe's mysterious effects. Absinthe is most often described as having the flavor of liquorice, with a bitter aftertaste."

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I've never tried it, but if its like mesq or shrooms results could vary person to person as it contains a toxin, which could likely make you sick or do some

stupid stuff. probably better off without it. :2cents:

"As its popularity grew, so did public hysteria over its mysterious effects. Absinthe was the subject of many studies into alcoholism, at the time it was referred to as Absinthism. Its use was even considered a ticket to the insane asylum. In August 1905, Jean Lanfray, a Swiss farmer and known absinthe drinker, shot his entire family."

"The essential oils in wormwood contains the chemical Thujone, which is a toxin. when taken in large amounts. Thujone is said to be responsible for Absinthe's mysterious effects. Absinthe is most often described as having the flavor of liquorice, with a bitter aftertaste."

Well if that isnt a sweet endorsement, I dont know what is!

C'mon, alcohol is a toxin, and everyone loves beer. :cheers:

I say pull up your skirt, grab your balls and a camera, buy a bottle, and let us all know how it goes.

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Yeah, I had some in Salamanca, Spain. The Czech Republic and Spain are the only two countries where it is legal. I believe Hemingway was "nuts" over it and it's the reason Van Gogh cut his ear off.

The stuff I had was green, tasted like licorice which I hate, but the buzz was certainly very different than getting drunk. My actions could be described as a "composed goofiness" if that makes sense.

The stories of legend were probably due to absenta binges. I had three shots and that was that.

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My buddy brought some back from Amsterdam, regular and black version or something.....great buzz, listerine-esque taste....but is a nice addition to many captain and cokes, beers, and jaeger shots. Got a tale to share but shouldn't about how it makes some do crazy things. It definitely leads to a fun Don and Mike show with Fez when they all get bombed on the stuff. :)

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I thought they lifted the ban recently...

You still have to buy it online, from overseas websites...so I'm assuming it's illegal...may not be for all I know, this thread pretty much proves that I don't know the legality or availability of it very well. Having said that, absinthe without the wormwood isn't illegal at all.

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You still have to buy it online, from overseas websites...so I'm assuming it's illegal...may not be for all I know, this thread pretty much proves that I don't know the legality or availability of it very well. Having said that, absinthe without the wormwood isn't illegal at all.

I think (not positive about this) that there is a legal version that lacks the wormwood component.

I do believe that the "true" version is considered illegal.........

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I think (not positive about this) that there is a legal version that lacks the wormwood component.

I do believe that the "true" version is considered illegal.........

Yea...I've tried that kind. Not bad at all, especially if you're not too averse to the taste of licorice.

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