Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

Tuesday Morning Quarterback Excerpts, 12/06/05


stwasm

Recommended Posts

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/9079845

Never was this on clearer display than in Buffalo's epic collapse at Miami: or the Dolphins' epic comeback, depending on one's point of view. Leading 23-3, the Bills reached first-and-goal on the Dolphins' 3 with 4:14 remaining in the third quarter. Had Buffalo simply run up the middle three consecutive times, a game-icing touchdown was likely. But even had the Bills run up the middle thrice and been stuffed, the field goal makes it 26-3 and the rushes grind the clock, leaving the Dolphins behind by 23 points with only a quarter to play. Instead Buffalo coaches got cute and called a pass. Interception, plus no time taken off the clock -- and thus began the Bills' epic collapse or Dolphins' epic comeback, depending on one's point of view.

Awful tactics by Buffalo continued throughout the collapse. But then it's hard to blow a 20-point fourth-quarter lead -- awful tactics are required! When you've got a big fourth-quarter lead, the clock becomes your opponent. You must keep the clock ticking both to grind time and so that when the other team looks up at the scoreboard, players say to themselves, "It's too late." Yet in this clock-killing situation, Buffalo coaches kept signaling in passes that clanged to the ground incomplete. The Bills were 0-for-5 passing in the fourth quarter, meaning they stopped the clock for Miami five times. How polite! The Dolphins' winning touchdown came with 6 seconds to play. Had Buffalo simply rushed up the middle for no gain on the five plays when Bills' coaches called passes, time would have run out on the Miami comeback. Instead Buffalo repeatedly did the only thing that could keep Miami in the game -- stopped the clock. It's harsh to say, but nine out of 10 high-school coaches would have handled the fourth quarter better than Buffalo's coaching staff did Sunday.

A week ago, total unknown Harvard-guy rookie quarterback Ryan Fitzgerald came into the game by surprise and led the Rams to a stirring comeback victory. This week little-known quarterback Sage Rosenfels -- 26 pass completions in five years when he buckled his chinstrap Sunday -- came into the game by surprise and led Miami to a stirring comeback victory. One week after Fitzgerald was unstoppable in his surprise role, he started against the Redskins and looked like he soon will be applying to graduate school. So Rosenfels should feel lucky he won't start this coming weekend. There is a long tradition of defenders mentally clocking out if an unknown backup quarterback unexpectedly enters the game. When Fitzgerald entered the game against Houston, or Rosenfels against Buffalo, you could practically hear the defenders thinking, "We can take the rest of the day off." In contrast, when an unknown reserve quarterback is scheduled in advance to start, the tradition is he gets hammered. Defenders spend a week saying to each other, "We are not going to let that upstart embarrass us like he embarrassed the last guys."

Stats of the Week: Minnesota is 5-0 since Brad Johnson took over as quarterback.

Stats of the Week No. 2: In a span of 12 snaps, the Steelers were intercepted twice and fumbled three times.

Stats of the Week No. 3: Chicago's defense gained almost as many yards (140) as its offense (188).

Stats of the Week No. 4: In the first 41 minutes, Buffalo had 202 yards passing compared to 89 for Miami; in the final 19 minutes, Miami had 272 yards passing compared to zero for Buffalo.

Stats of the Week No. 5: The Packers have ended their streak of 13 nonlosing years, longest such streak in the league. The Eagles and Denver are next, each with five consecutive nonlosing seasons.

Retreats of the Week: For two successive weeks yours truly has written, "Tuesday Morning Quarterback fails to grasp the logic of ordering quarterbacks to sprint backward into their own end zones." Make it three consecutive weeks; Washington and Miami gave up safeties Sunday using this tactic. At least the Dolphins were way behind and had the excuse of playing catch-up. The Redskins led 17-7 with 11:59 remaining in the fourth, had first-and-10 on their 6. Inexplicably, 'Skins coaches ordered Mark Brunell to sprint backward into his own end zone, where the ball was knocked loose; only Brunell alertly whapping the rock out of bounds confined the damage to a safety, rather than a St. Louis touchdown. (Brunell was called for TMQ's favorite penalty, "illegal bat;" the Rams declined in order to get the two points.) You're on the 6-yard line and protecting a late lead, why run backward to the place where bad stuff happens?

Next Week: Officials Called to Congress to Testify Under Oath About a Pass Interference Call: Hard on Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., threatening congressional hearings into whether the Eagles could be forced to play He Who Need Not Be Named, Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, a leading member of the House of Representatives, has announced hearings tomorrow into the BCS selection formula. Two weeks ago, I speculated about what would happen if government got involved in oversight of sports -- Rep. Barton, that was a joke! The BCS formula consistently malfunctions: Oregon slighted while West Virginia advances is this year foul-up. Yours truly has proposed that college football go back to the old smoke-filled-room selection system and simply admit the purpose of the exercise is to maximize ratings and revenue. But however bungling, the BCS is a privately run organization with no relevance to public policy: what possible reason does Congress have for sticking its nose in? Rep. Barton made his reputation as a free-market conservative, the kind of person who believes that government is best which governs least. Unless there's publicity for Rep. Barton involved, apparently.

Reached at the North Pole, Santa Told TMQ, "I Knew They Was Gonna Boo Me and Rudolph in Philadelphia, But When They Booed Mother Teresa, That Crossed a Line": OK, so things didn't go quite as planned for the Eagles on Monday night. But the Philly crowd began booing the home team in the middle of the first quarter, for criminy's sake. By the middle of the second quarter, the crowd was booing on every other Philadelphia play. All these Eagles have done is produce a Super Bowl trip, five consecutive playoff seasons and 11 playoff appearances in the past 17 seasons. Get a little perspective, Philadelphia!

Worst Play by a Future First-Ballot Hall of Famer: Green Bay leading 7-6, the Packers had first-and-goal on the Bears 7 with 24 seconds left in the first half, Green Bay holding a timeout. The timeout means that no matter what might go wrong, Green Bay can stop the clock, kick a field goal and have a four-point halftime lead against a low-scoring team. Instead, Brett Favre, under tackle, heave-hoes a nutty pass that is intercepted and returned 95 yards to the Packers 7, whence Chicago kicks a field goal as the half expires, taking a 9-7 halftime lead. Great Caesar's ghost!

Worst Play by Someone Who Might Someday Be a Hall of Famer: The Giants leading 17-3 at the end of the third quarter, Jersey/A faced third-and-5 from its 15. Under pressure, Eli Manning heave-hoed a nutty pass directly to a Dallas defender; the Cowboys scored a touchdown on the next snap, and suddenly it's a tense game. There is a time to plant and a time to reap; a time to dance and a time to mourn; a time to take the sack and a time to throw the ball away. Little brother note: Manning won the Denver game in the closing seconds by throwing a risky pass while falling backward under tackle. Since then, he has thrown while falling backward three more times, and all have been interceptions.

Lend Me a Blocker!: Jersey/A leading Dallas 10-0 on the first snap of the second half, Drew Bledsoe tried to make a "stretch" handoff right and was hit by Giants defensive lineman Kendrick Clancy before he could even hand off the ball; linebacker Antonio Pierce recovered and scored the touchdown that proved Jersey/A's winning margin. Guard Andre Gurode barely so much as brushed Clancy, then just stood there watching. Carolina leading Atlanta 7-6, the Falcons went for it on fourth-and-1 on the Panthers 46. Though Atlanta is the No. 1 rushing club in the league, the call was for Michael Vick to play-fake and sprint backward 10 yards. No Falcons lineman even attempted to touch Carolina defensive end Mike Rucker, who blew through to drop Vick for a long loss on what proved the game's key play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would they stop yapping about Antonio's TD return? One of his teammates was probably offsides he got to the ball so damn fast, then the ball just happened to land right in front of him on his way towards the endzone. He picked it up and ran 30 feet with nobody there to stop him. WOOHOO!! PRO BOWL PLAY THERE!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would they stop yapping about Antonio's TD return? One of his teammates was probably offsides he got to the ball so damn fast, then the ball just happened to land right in front of him on his way towards the endzone. He picked it up and ran 30 feet with nobody there to stop him. WOOHOO!! PRO BOWL PLAY THERE!

Thank you. When I saw that play, I immediately thought about how the refs would probably call it offsides if it were us. We block an extra point to seal a win, and we MUST be offsides. A Giants lineman is in the backfield quick enough to almost take the handoff and it must be because of his anticipation. God I hate the Giants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just wondering if he was watching the Redskins game to make a comment like that. Brunell didn't "sprint backward into his own end zone", he dropped back to pass, and Portis ran into him as he did, and Brunell fumbled. Brunell wasn't deep in the end zone when this happened, and what he did help save the game for us.

Jason

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"This week little-known quarterback Sage Rosenfels -- 26 pass completions in five years when he buckled his chinstrap Sunday -- came into the game by surprise and led Miami to a stirring comeback victory. One week after Fitzgerald was unstoppable in his surprise role, he started against the Redskins and looked like he soon will be applying to graduate school. So Rosenfels should feel lucky he won't start this coming weekend."

We havent played Arizona yet

I dont get what he is trying to say. Am i the only one that doesnt understand this? Help me out. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"This week little-known quarterback Sage Rosenfels -- 26 pass completions in five years when he buckled his chinstrap Sunday -- came into the game by surprise and led Miami to a stirring comeback victory. One week after Fitzgerald was unstoppable in his surprise role, he started against the Redskins and looked like he soon will be applying to graduate school. So Rosenfels should feel lucky he won't start this coming weekend."

We havent played Arizona yet

I dont get what he is trying to say. Am i the only one that doesnt understand this? Help me out. :D

He's trying to say that Fitzgerald looked awesome against Houston. Then Fitzgerald got crushed by us. So it looks like Fitzgerald is not the QB savior of the Rams everyone thought he would be and Fitzgerald will now have to apply to graduate school instead of continuing his football career (he was joking).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inexplicably, 'Skins coaches ordered Mark Brunell to sprint backward into his own end zone, where the ball was knocked loose; only Brunell alertly whapping the rock out of bounds confined the damage to a safety, rather than a St. Louis touchdown. (Brunell was called for TMQ's favorite penalty, "illegal bat;" the Rams declined in order to get the two points.) You're on the 6-yard line and protecting a late lead, why run backward to the place where bad stuff happens?[/color]

What the? So they think that once the ball was fumbled, Gibbs ordered Brunell to go chase it? in the middle of the play? lol. What's even better is they're questioning why even chased it and batted it out...I mean what else would he do, stand there and let the Rams get it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just wondering if he was watching the Redskins game to make a comment like that. Brunell didn't "sprint backward into his own end zone", he dropped back to pass, and Portis ran into him as he did, and Brunell fumbled. Brunell wasn't deep in the end zone when this happened, and what he did help save the game for us.

Jason

He lives in Potomac, MD so I generally assume he watches the Redskins games.

The expression "sprint backward into his own end zone" is a recurring phrase in the TMQ column ... he is criticizing the fact that we called a pass with more than a 3-step drop - the point is when you are backed up close to your own end zone, you should either call a very quick pass or a running play; it was a pretty uncharacteristically non-conservative play-call by Gibbs in that situation.

Also, Easterbrook actually compliments Brunell for "alertly" knocking the ball out of the end zone.

There are plenty of mistakes in this column (like confusing Fitzpatrick with Fitzgerald, which is a mistake I actually just heard Torry Holt make on the radio), but there's nothing that is blatantly unfair to the Redskins.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"This week little-known quarterback Sage Rosenfels -- 26 pass completions in five years when he buckled his chinstrap Sunday -- came into the game by surprise and led Miami to a stirring comeback victory. One week after Fitzgerald was unstoppable in his surprise role, he started against the Redskins and looked like he soon will be applying to graduate school. So Rosenfels should feel lucky he won't start this coming weekend."

We havent played Arizona yet

I dont get what he is trying to say. Am i the only one that doesnt understand this? Help me out. :D

Whoever wrote this article didnt pay close enough attention to detail... The QB's name is Ryan Fitzpatrick not Ryan Fitzgerald :doh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...