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Buying A New Tv? Plasma, Ldp, Lcd, Or Crt


DeanCollins

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I like to hear from ES fans, about thier tv's as I am considering the purchase of a new one. If you have one you like, or opinions on a particular type or brand, post it. How is your DLP, LCD, or Plasma.

My Sony projection is getting old.

gray_dotline_vert.gifsend_nodots.gif gray_dotline_vert.gifprint_nodots.gif gray_dotline_vert.gifspacer.gif TV guide: How the technologies compare

Tech-

nology

Screen

sizes

Price

range Pluses Minuses Bottom line spacer.gifspacer.gif

13 to

36 in.

Less than $100 to $3,000 Mature, proven technology. Least expensive type of TV, with best video quality.

Maximum screen size limited. Larger sets are big, bulky, and heavy (more than 200 pounds).

Still the standard for top picture quality, these offer wide selection and best value.

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LCD

(available to subscribers)

14 to

46 in.

$500 to

$11,000 Thin and light. Can be wall-mounted. Sleek look. No risk of burn-in of static images. Some can double as a computer display.

Maximum screen size limited--for now, at least. Larger models can be costly. Image may dim as you angle away from center of screen. Have less contrast than direct-view sets.

Trendy flat screen with decent picture quality, but much more expensive than similar-sized direct-view sets.

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Plasma

(available to subscribers)

32 to

63 in.

$3,000 to

$25,000 Screens can be very large. Thin and wall-mountable. Sleek look. High brightness and contrast.

Power-hungry. Generate lots of heat. Some lack speakers and tuner. Burn-in of static images a concern. Fairly heavy. Wall-mounting can be costly.

Big, bright screens with a real wow factor, but expensive.

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Rear projection (CRT-based)

(available to subscribers)

38 to

61 in.

$1,000 to

$6,000 Lowest price for big-screen TV, with wide selection and plentiful features.

Big, bulky, and heavy. CRTs need periodic realignment. Image may dim as you angle away from center of screen. May require professional installation.

The lowest-cost big screens, but they’re space hogs.

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Rear projection

(LCD- and DLP-based) (available to subscribers)

40 to

70 in.

$2,800 to

$7,000 Thinner and lighter than CRT-based siblings. No risk of burn-in. Higher resolution than CRT-based units.

Pricey, especially for bigger screens. LCD-based: black parts of image not truly black. Image may dim as you angle away from center of screen. Backlight bulb may need periodic replacement.

Relative slimness makes them an attractively priced big-screen alternative to expensive flat panels.

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Could those of you guys that have posted in these threads in the past link to them--I've done a few searches and haven't come up with anything good.

I know Monte51Coleman among others are experts on this stuff.

I'm in a similar position as DeanCollins--but I need something that will fit in a 1BR apartment in Manhattan--so space is a major issue.

Thanks guys for your help.

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I have been researching wide screen HDTVs for quite some time now. Not to the Nth degree, but just as your average consumer.

It's frustrating to me. I don't want to spend much over 2K-2.5K, but the TVs available in this price range and under have enough drawbacks to keep me from purchasing.

As is see it:

Has to be HD. If I'm spending this kind of $$, not going to settle for ED.

LCD projection: Probably the best value right now. I have almost pulled the trigger a couple of times on one of these. What has stopped me is the "angle of viewing" issues and the fact that I will be replacing lamps periodically. The pictures are fine looking straight on, but be too far to either side or too low or high and the picture is not good at all.

LCD: Still too pricey when the screens get over 30"-32", but this may be the option I ultimately settle on. Nice pictures without angle issues or burn-in issues.

DLP: I can't do these. I'm not the pickiest guy in the world, but when I've viewed these sets inthe showrooms it looks ike you are viewing the picture through some type of barely visible screen. Drove me nuts!

Plasma: Best picture and has no viewing angle issues. I'm still a bit afraid of the possiblity of burn-in, though. I'm not a gamer, but I do watch a lot of sports and the amount of tickers and bugs on todays games make me fear I'd be risking burn-in. Plus, my kids have a tendancy to watch a program from the DVR and leave it when it's over, leaving a still frame on the screen until I come behind them and turn it off.

Also, plasma has a life which can't be extended by replacing parts. 30K hours and your set will be half as brilliant as when you purchase it. I suppose this means that you could concievably start to see some degradation in as little as 15K-20K hours. That's quite few years of normal use, but at these prices it bothers me to think of just tossing it and buying another one.

Finally, an HD plasma in the size I'm looking for (42 in) is still just out of the range I'm wanting to pay. By the time you add in a service plan (wouldn't purchase ANY of these TVs without one) you'll be into the 3.5K-4.5K range. Too much for me.

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Thanks for the input Brave. I didn't know that about plasmas. That seems like a substantial cause for concern as I'd rather not have something that's that expensive degrade like that. However, given that an average person works 2K hours a year, that'd be a LOT of TV watching before you're losing quality. But the burn-in seems like the worst (potential) problem for what you've written.

Maybe the best thing to do right now is wait--both for prices to go down and for the technology to improve some?

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I bought a Sony XBR 70" which is LCD projection last year. I love it best TV I've ever had. The picture is stunning and I have not had any problems with views from the side. This was alot bigger problem with the CRT based TV's. The LCD projection have a very wide angle of view.

Right now with the technologies out there I would go with one of the Sony LCD projection sets. To me its the best compramise of size, picture quality and price.

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I'm in the same position with buying a Tv. I should be moved into my new house by January and I'm looking to dump a couple thousand on a new TV. At first I was going to go with a Plasma but after looking at the Sharp Aquos LCD I can't even look at another TV. The cost is around 4-5 thousand though.

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On base at Bethesda the Exchange has a Sony 60 in LCD HD ready for $2900 my brother may buy it for his basement/den/playroom

Going to Tweeters in Rockville to check out the DLP either today or tomorrow

That Sony is a great set. Just make sure when your comparing the TV's that you know what the source is. Sometimes its HDTV, sometimes its a DVD. Can mislead you into thinking one TV is better than the other when its actually the source. Try to look at Discovery HD for comparison.

Also be sure to look at some analog channels on the TV. There is a huge difference in how some of these TV's handle analog broadcast. Some look decent others are borderline unwatchable.

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I've been wanting to get an HDTV as well but I have one concern. This may just be my needing a new pair of glasses but every time I try to watch HDTV it looks slightly distorted and hurts my eyes. Anyone else have this problem?

Have you been watching DLP or LCD? The DLP uses a spinning mirror to project the image and in a small percentage of people has caused eyestrain and headaches. Its called the Rainbow Effect.

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Have you been watching DLP or LCD? The DLP uses a spinning mirror to project the image and in a small percentage of people has caused eyestrain and headaches. Its called the Rainbow Effect.

Some common misnomers are attributed to TV's which are no longer true.

1. DLPs do not have the "rainbow effect" anymore. When DLPs first came out, the color wheel spun at 300Hz. Now, it spins at 6000hz. and this removes the rainbow effect from the 2% of the population that could see it.

2. Plasmas do not have the "burn in" anymore. There are screen wash techniques you can use if you do see the "burn in".

3. Replacement bulbs on LCD and DLP projection TVs are covered under service contracts, so you will not have to purchase them until the contract runs out.

I have a 50in. Samsung DLP, the pedestal kind. The picture is freakin great, and I have had absolutely no porblems with is so far. I'n not sure why the picture sucked in the showroom, but many times slaesmen will "tune down" the pictures of the TVs they make the least amount of commissions on.

2 more bonus' of DLP technology. First, it is simple technology. It consists of a chip, a wheel and mirrors. If anything goes wrong, it can be fixed, and the TV doesn't need to be scrapped. Second, it does not degrade over time like other technologies.

Either way, the choice is yours, but look at the cost/benifit analysis. What will your position be in regards to the TV, that will determine the size. Where you want to set it up, how you want your surround system to be located etc. These are all decisions that will come into your decision. Eitherway good luck. Football games in HD ROCK, you'll wonder how you could ever watch one without HD :D

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Some common misnomers are attributed to TV's which are no longer true.

1. DLPs do not have the "rainbow effect" anymore. When DLPs first came out, the color wheel spun at 300Hz. Now, it spins at 6000hz. and this removes the rainbow effect from the 2% of the population that could see it.

Just know what your buying. If you by a steeply discounted DLP set it could be of the first generation.

Another thing to consider is where the TV will be placed in regards to lighting. In a room that is brighter a LCD projection set will ussually look better than a DLP set. The LCD sets are brighter in general. But the black levels are supposed to be better on DLP sets.

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I'm in the same position with buying a Tv. I should be moved into my new house by January and I'm looking to dump a couple thousand on a new TV. At first I was going to go with a Plasma but after looking at the Sharp Aquos LCD I can't even look at another TV. The cost is around 4-5 thousand though.

I have the Sharp 32inch LCD Aquos and love it. A little over a year ago the 32inch went for about 3k-3.5k, now i see them for about $1500 these days.

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I bought a Sony XBR 70" which is LCD projection last year. I love it best TV I've ever had. The picture is stunning and I have not had any problems with views from the side. This was alot bigger problem with the CRT based TV's. The LCD projection have a very wide angle of view.

Right now with the technologies out there I would go with one of the Sony LCD projection sets. To me its the best compramise of size, picture quality and price.

I've got the Sony 56" LCD rear projection, and I have to agree. I haven't had any problems with side viewing. As far as the lamp is concerned, I was told it should last well over 3 years, but since I bought a 3 yr maintenance, they'll change it for free...not to mention lamps are relatively inexpensive.

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I've had my tv just a little over a year and I picked up a replacement lamp just in case. I heard the service plan will replace them, but sometimes it takes a week or two to get someone out. I'm not sure if they will just send you a lamp. Can't put my HD Redskins viewing in jeopardy.

Can't have that. :-)

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That's a great picture HOF44.

What do you guys think of this TV: http://www.crutchfield.com/S-Wh28avnxMPd/cgi-bin/prodview.asp?i=158KD42A10&s=0&cc=01

Its a very good TV, the price is a little high. You can get a 50" with stand included from Costco for 2399.00. Check out the stand prices, they can be pretty high. The stand for the 42" is 300.00. So it ends up costing you only 99.00 more to get the 50" from costco.

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11091118&whse=BC&topnav=&cat=4117&hierPath=2341*

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No costco's local to you? They pretty much have a lifetime return policy. I guess my point is you can get that price level at other places that are trustworthy.

You have a Sam's Club?

I saved 880 on mine by finding a local place that had them very cheap but I didn't really trust, then went to Circuit City and they price matched it -another 10%.

Crutchfield is a very reputable place, but they almost always charge msrp.

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