thesubmittedone

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Everything posted by thesubmittedone

  1. thesubmittedone

    Where do you think Jay Gruden and Greg Manusky rank?

    You need talented players who are multi dimensional to be less predictable. You need players who aren’t only talented but also fit within each other’s positional groups that add to the skill sets versus being redundant. And you need to do this at the majority of positions (or the most important ones at the same time) instead of one or two here and there while regressing horribly at another one or two. Essentially, you need be very good at resource management. Bruce sucks at it. But, don’t worry, you’ll get to do as most fans do and target the coaches when said personnel remains a major problem. And you’ll, of course, look right and think you’re a genius based on the results. Because, hey, we’re “talented” here or there. Only for another coach to come in here and stink it up (so long as this organizational structure remains as is). I really hope the next poor soul we hire at HC is someone you wanted yourself. That way maybe, just maybe, you’d realize you have next to no idea how to evaluate coaching in the pro ranks (not a knock, it’s damn near impossible to do so with the limited info we have as fans and just how much their environment factors into it). But what I hope for the most is that Jay gets a healthy team this year, elevates them more than he ever has before (which he’s been a big part of doing, hence our consistently mediocre record even under horrendous resource managing), and then gets to have a legit GM help him with resource managing. That’s unlikely, of course. So the next best thing is we hire a good coach and do the above. Maybe one day we’ll all sit and laugh about these arguments while we praise our brilliant and innovative FO exec/s for their foresight and resource management that continually one ups most teams around the league. Maybe one day, God willing. And then, of course, there will be plenty who will remain surface oriented and simply assume the coaches we’ve got are simply the greatest ever, even as they get plucked and go elsewhere and fail because their FO isn’t at our level. Or they don’t have Tom Brady. But, yeah. Fans gonna fan and the NFL is going to be the NFL. It’s been nice to see just how much emphasis more and more smart people are placing on executives versus the over-emphasis on coaching at the pro level these days.
  2. The Athletic Training Staff actually includes folks who are medically trained. They aren’t just random dudes. Larry Hess himself has a Master’s degree in Physical Therapy which is an allied health profession. So he carries with him some level of authority in terms of diagnosis.
  3. I don’t know how else to spell it out for you. I mean, it’s as clear as it gets. The Athletic Training Staff is often the first line of diagnosis for players. They also are where players rehabilitate. One of their main responsibilities is to direct players to the proper specialists within the Medical Staff as necessary. In the case of Trent, what virtually every reporter who has reported on it has said, is that Trent was told, by the Athletic Training Staff, that his cyst wasn’t a big deal and to wait until the end of season to get it checked out. Now, that in and of itself might not seem like a big deal, but we don’t know exactly what else he’s pissed about that they’ve done in the past, nor do we know if it’s just related to things they’ve told him and not other players he’s witnessed. Hence, why Moses said what he said. This absolutely ties EXCLUSIVELY into the responsibilities of the Athletic Training Staff and no one else. None of the above is hard to grasp. None. All I did was delineate the various arms of the operation regarding player health. That’s all. All I said was the focus of whatever issue the players have is on ONE of these arms; the Athletic Training Staff. One of the reasons I’m doing this is so the other two arms (Medical and S&C) aren’t targeted unnecessarily and/or unfairly by fans. It’s why I used @JSSkinz post as a launching point, since he was saying the Doctors in the Medical Staff all seem very credible and reputable (which they are). This is all verifiable and, furthermore, obvious due to the specific responsibilities of the Athletic Training Staff versus the other two arms. He’s not going to be pissed at Strength and Conditioning regarding his cyst or whatever else happened injury-wise because all they do is work with them in the weight room and on their athleticism. They, like the rest of the coaching staff, get the thumbs up from the Athletic Trainers with regards to what they can work on. We don’t know much about the Doctors within the Medical staff because of the inherent confidentiality there, but it’s unlikely he’s pissed at them since they’re the ones who eventually diagnosed him correctly. Or he simply never spoke with them and it was his own council that told him. But, again, we don’t know much there. The other players who’ve actually come out with any problem have directed their angst at issues that directly correspond to what the Athletic Trainers do. Not Strength and Conditioning. Not the Doctors from INOVA or James Andrews. I don’t know how else to put it, man. You’re arguing against yourself. This isn’t hard, but you simply can’t handle anything other than glowing praise of this wonderful organization Dan and Bruce has put together, so you’ll probably respond to this repeating the same incoherent rhetoric. God help me for daring to post my once every two months post.
  4. See the portion of your post I bolded? Therein lies the issue. @Califan007 preemptively tried to explain your confusion to you to help lessen the blow, but you’re such a condescending snarky shark that I feel the need to hit you hard on it anyway. Read what I posted again about the responsibilities of the Training Staff. Here, I’ll make it easy for you, I’ll even bold the parts you need to focus on: You see, within that post you had the answers to any of your questions. But instead of actually attempting to comprehend what I wrote, you saw my username, had your usual heart attack because I’m not amongst those who conflate and equate ownership and his top executive with being a Skins fan, and assumed it was some direct challenge to the world you want to live in about them (not judging). Don’t worry, I’ll go back to my quiet place (because contrary to how you’ve labeled many of us, I don’t actually enjoy the utter distrust that I have in them so I’d rather not spell it out every chance I get) and you can go back to fighting the good fight.
  5. I think this is as good a post as any to launch into something that most of us (including myself) either don’t know or forget. There are three arms, if you will, of the entire operation. You have the Strength and Conditioning Staff who works with the players in the weight room and focuses on making them the best versions of themselves athletically. This staff is under the purview of the Head Coach. You then have the Medical Staff which consists of the actual Doctors and Surgeons who perform operations on the players. In the case of the Skins, that’s the Doctors from INOVA as well as James Andrews. Finally, you have the Athletic Training Staff lead by Larry Hess. These guys are the ones who deal with the rehabilitation of players and are the main line of communication between the Medical staff as well as the Coaching staff. By all accounts, Trent’s problem (as well as many other players) is with the Athletic Training Staff. That’s where coaches get the thumbs up or down about playing players or where players go first before being directed to the specialists within the Medical Staff. Our top local beat reporters have essentially all stated this. They’ve also stated that they’ve never heard any players speak other than glowingly about the Strength and Conditioning Staff. They don’t say much about the Medical Staff because of confidentiality, of course, so they can’t say either way on that. But they definitely have heard from numerous players that they have a major problem with the Athletic Trainers. That’s the known issue and there is no doubt in that. Hopefully that helps clear it up a bit, but I’m sure we’ll all forget again in 5 minutes.
  6. thesubmittedone

    #PrayforRadyn - Derrius Guice related

    Heartbreaking. Mod directive: Please keep this as a thread dedicated to Radyn and offering condolences to his family, nothing political as can occur considering the cause of death. Take that to the Tailgate if you’d like to speak on that, thanks.
  7. thesubmittedone

    Welcome to the Redskins Dwayne Haskins QB Ohio State

    That’s what you got from that? See, I can gif like you bro. Yeah, he definitely did in the 2nd half of that game when they started blitzing up the middle, which I went over in my post here: Nonetheless, he was more effective at handling interior pressure starting right about that 2nd half against Maryland through Michigan, Northwestern and then Washington until that 2nd half. So, like I said in that post, my hope is that it was more of a “letting off the gas” thing than it was Haskins really regressing there again. The reason I have that hope is it did seem like the entire Ohio State team relaxed once they were up big in that game. Who knows, though, it’s definitely a legitimate question. But that is why I’m not going to mention that 2nd half against Washington every time I talk about Haskins’ improvement with interior pressure. It’s a qualifier I feel is unnecessary since the improvement was real to my eyes and occurred over a longer period of game time, if that makes sense. It could end up as further evidence he just sucks at it and that improvement was due to something else that was more anomalous than anything, so maybe I’m wrong to downplay it. But that’s how I felt after I had watched the entire season chronologically without much background noise as to what happened. That last half just felt more like the exception to his improvement with interior pressure than the other way around. It’s funny, because Daniel Jones will absolutely NEED good tackles if he’s going to survive. My God was he particularly bad at sensing edge pressure. Like I’ve stated before, he might bust on that alone.
  8. thesubmittedone

    Welcome to the Redskins Dwayne Haskins QB Ohio State

    Sorry I didn't get back to you on this until now, been busy. To answer your question... I don't know right now, honestly. I don't think anyone can really know right now. Here's what I do know: 1) Haskins absolutely excelled at sensing edge pressure in college. He was really, really good at it. Like, it's a severely underrated aspect of his game since the vast majority of people talk about his arm talent when praising him and not that. But will that translate to the NFL where everything happens that much faster? I don't know. 2) He wasn't good at all handling interior pressure the vast majority of the season (and that's what I think the scouts who harp on that are exclusively focusing on)... but something did change for him there right around the Maryland game (which said scouts seem to ignore). To my eyes, it was literally the 2nd half of Maryland where you could see the change. What I find fascinating is that the MD game is where Ohio State started having him run the ball more... so my amateur opinion is that the contact he got from those runs prepared him more, or "toughened him up" so to speak, and made him less "panicky" when he got pressured up the middle. Total speculation on my end. But he started actually manipulating the pocket more and even made some nice throws outside of the pocket when he had to, which is something he just wasn't doing previous to that. So, first, the question is what actually translates from the above to the NFL? I'm of the mind that, normally, whatever you excelled at in college is going to take, at the very least, a slight hit as you adjust to the NFL's pace (more often than not it's a big hit). And it might never improve after that, either. So making personnel decisions right now based off of the above is difficult in my mind. There is going to be a learning curve for Haskins and even if his sense of edge pressure does translate, it might be a while before we really see it. Secondly, the question is whether or not the improvement he made towards the end of the season in terms of handling interior pressure, manipulating the pocket better, and being more accurate outside of the pocket (versus just panicking and not really looking down the field) continues to occur. Does he regress there? Is there something fundamentally wrong about his feet that ends up making it impossible for him to ever really get good at that? That might be the case, but then does he start using his size to his advantage more and have guys bounce off of him (something he, unfortunately, didn't do in college much if at all)? There are many ways this can go. But let's just say, for argument's sake, that what he excelled at in terms of sensing edge pressure translates and he just never improves much at handling interior pressure. Then, yes, it is absolutely necessary for Bruce to prioritize the interior Oline and place less emphasis on the Tackle position. This is actually what the Saints did when they first brought in Drew Brees. It's not the end of the world if Haskins never improves there so long as you build and manage resources properly (something we have been awful at under Bruce). We'll start to see the signs during training camp and then into the preseason of what translated and what hasn't. And even then the questions will remain since, if he looks good, it'll likely be against lesser opponents and, if he doesn't, it might be because he's thinking too much trying to figure out a new offense. So it'll be hard to gauge on our end either way... but that's why the guys in charge of personnel get paid the big bucks, they've got to sift through all of that and figure it out quick. it's really going to be fascinating. This isn't directed at you... but this goes back to what I constantly harp on in terms of roster construction and how important the synergy is. It's why I'm so hard on Bruce. People think personnel acquisition is just about acquiring talent. That's such a ridiculously narrow view of it, it's no wonder why coaching gets so intensely focused in on instead. It's the easiest surface-level target. The owners and their upper-level management hires are shielded by them simply by default. There is this dance involved with resource management and depth that is incredibly intricate and requires expertise beyond what most laymen often consider. How positional groups benefit from each other, how players within those positional groups benefit each other, what kind of players and type of skill sets are needed to complete a positional group, how important it is to get as much multi-dimensional depth as possible so they can fit into multiple roles were anyone to get hurt, etc... A fun, hyperbolic but nonetheless telling, example of this would be, say, acquiring a bunch of Desean Jackson's at WR while having a large, power-blocking Oline with speedy RBs who like to get outside and, finally, a QB with an average arm but accurate in the short to intermediate game. Let's assume they all have that name like Djax and are known to be productive. That'd be "acquiring talent", right? No one is going to say the individual WRs aren't uber talented, or those individual Olinemen stink, or the speedy RBs can't play, or that QB isn't franchise material. But then imagine how limiting that's going to be for an offensive scheme? How easy it'll be for defensive coordinators to deal with (play your Safeties super deep and stack the middle against the run since you know they can't block outside). Ignorant fan who has little to no idea about the one-dimensional nature of the personnel then trashes offensive coach who was given these tools. Claims of "he can't adjust or adapt" are thrown out there with ease while completely omitting just how impossible it is to do so when, were you to play to the strengths of your WRs, you'd be giving D coordinators a simple solution to take them away with a QB who struggles to get the ball out that far that quickly. Were you to play to the strength of your RBs, you'd be wasting the skill sets of your Oline while your WRs fail to help on the outside. Were you to play to the strengths of your Oline, you'd be wasting the skill set of your RBs and WRs. There are a million permutations of the above that happen all the time in the NFL. The executive who understands all of this recognizes these things and assembles talent that feed off of each other all while managing resources at a high level with the cap and draft picks. This is what the Redskins under Snyder have missed on during his entire tenure. Either that gets fixed or we're going to stay on the cycle of coaching changes (whether or not they’re “patient” with them) that simply don't matter in the long run. So back to the Trent/Scherff/outside or interior Oline thing. If Haskins's skill set translates, does Bruce prioritize spending on Trent (or just generally spending high on Tackles as is the norm), thus making the resources available for interior Oline tighter? Let's say we draft an elite college tackle... no one will say that isn't "acquiring talent", but is it assembling talent that meshes within a positional group and elevates the other's skill sets dependent on said positional group? Nope. But here's what will definitely happen... the coaches will get trashed for it. Probably the QB, too. And on and on we go.
  9. thesubmittedone

    Welcome to the Redskins Dwayne Haskins QB Ohio State

    I don't know why I'm just posting this now, but I figure what the heck. Some time within the first week of May I started to watch the 2018 Ohio State season chronologically. I haven't been as involved in anything football-related as I normally am this past year, so I came to it knowing next to nothing about what went down or how Haskins is perceived, which I think really gave me as unbiased an eye as I've ever had watching a player. The following are the bits and pieces of a private discussion I had starting around May 11th and ending on May 15th regarding what I saw as I went through it... yeah, I know, why didn't I just post it then and why now? Not sure, really, but I think it might be interesting for anyone who wants to see how it looks from the perspective of someone going through the season as if he's "in the moment" and without much of any outside noise prejudicing the observations. I also started doing a comparison with Daniel Jones shortly after which I thought might interest some of you: A day later: A few days later: Following day: In response to being told about Jones's poor accuracy stats in throws that are 10+: In response to being told about the complaints regarding Jones during the Senior Bowl with fumbles lost as well as his propensity for sacks and INTs in general: In response to bringing Haskins back into the conversation again: In response to Jones's ability to make plays on the move: So that's that. Hope someone enjoyed this chronicle and there aren't too many of you rolling your eyes at me for posting all this now and seemingly out of nowhere. Oh, and I do want to point out that I never finished Daniel Jones's season. I stopped there because it looked like, from what the person I was discussing all this with said, he still was largely the same guy in the Senior Bowl that I saw after the first 4 games he started in (as mentioned above, he missed two games early on). Nonetheless, my point does stand that it might be an unfair evaluation of Jones. Either way, I'm pretty excited about Haskins as a prospect. The issues people talk about are all there, and that's why he fell to 15... but what I'm excited about is that not only are they correctable, but he actually improved upon them during the season and in the biggest moments at that. That's really my biggest takeaway.
  10. So if a player hasn’t cooperated with them once or twice, it’s ok if they poison them with an incorrect drug prescription? Or if they just half-ass a surgery? Or if they tell them everything is fine when it isn’t and it gets worse? I mean, at what point, in your mind, is it not hypocritical to take issue with something the medical staff has done? It’s that simple to you? He hasn’t cooperated therefore anything they do should be acceptable and he can’t have any problem with it? The dude had something terrifying happen with his friggin head for God’s sake. He’s human. You’re mad that he’s upset? Geez. I mean, if you said you just don’t like the way he’s handling it and it should’ve stayed in house, I could get that train of thought (though we don’t know how much of it was handled behind closed doors and what, if anything, caused the tipping point). I’m moving on from this now. You can have the last word on it. As for what’s going on... I’m listening to John Keim’s most recent podcast right now. He and Tarik Al-Bashir spell it out really well. Tarik specifically mentioned something that has to do with what I’ve been going on about for years regarding fans, as is their norm, attacking the coaching staff for everything when often times it’s something deeper organizationally. He said that it’s all really divided into three different parts. You’ve got the strength and conditioning guys lead by Chad Englehart. You’ve got the athletic training staff ran by Larry Hess. And then you’ve got the medical staff that is headed by doctors like James Andrews and Robin West. Tarik states that Chad does a great job and that he’s heard nothing but good things from the players regarding strength and conditioning (John chimes in and says it’s been unanimous in terms of players being pleased with them). As for the athletic training staff headed by Larry Hess, he said, “not so much”, to which John subtly adds, “right”. And, finally, regarding the medical staff, they both said they have zero access to them and didn’t mention what, if anything, the players have said. I’ve made multiple posts regarding this when fans have attacked the strength and conditioning staff (usually as a means of trashing Jay), that it’s likely an organizational issue and not a coaching one (per the norm). I’ve specifically pointed at Larry Hess who’s been here forever. I honestly didn’t think the medical staff themselves would be an issue, but here we are. So I wasn’t surprised to hear John and Tarik affirm this at all. It’s how I’ve felt for a while now. To Dan’s credit, and Tarik mentioned this, he hasn’t necessarily been cheap about addressing it. But it doesn’t seem like he has been effective with where he’s put his money. I don’t know what the relationship with INOVA entails, either... I know Dr. West is a part of that. There is something off about it all, though. The amount of injuries, the amount of players in the past who’ve complained, and now one of our biggest leaders... it’s definitely worrisome.
  11. No, he can’t. If they don’t give their okay to the coaches, they’re not allowed to play them. That’s how this works. If you’re insinuating that Trent and others constantly hide their injuries and, therefore, the medical staff isn’t responsible... well, I think that’s frankly absurd, but even were that to be the case I’d still hold them somewhat accountable because they should have a system in place that makes it difficult for players to do so. I don’t get what you’re saying here. Do you think a player can just tell the team doctors, “I want to play” and they just HAVE to abide? That is not how it works. The medical staff tells the coaches which players can actually go and which ones can’t. They implemented that system precisely as a means to avoid players hiding it, like I mentioned above. And if that's happening with other injuries within our own team, then they should follow suit and do what it takes to prevent that. More than that, really, the NFL was worried about potential lawsuits erupting from the whole concussions issue. But this is a bad example because concussion-related symptoms can fly under the radar pretty easily. That doesn’t mean the doctors never had final say and the players always could do what they want. I’ve never heard a HC say anything other than that they need the approval of the team doctors to allow an injured player to practice or play.
  12. Well, sure sounds like you are sticking up for them. I agree, players are culpable all the time and it does muddy the waters in terms of how accountable the medical staff can be when players hide things. Nonetheless, I think you're downplaying their role here. They are the ones who give the final "go ahead" or "thumbs up" to the coaches that a player can go. They ultimately have that power and, therefore, responsibility. They can say no to any player no matter how much they beg them or want to play. It's that simple. If the medical staff themselves are that easily influenced, or are giving the go ahead to guys who it shouldn't be given to, that is ultimately on them. Can't have it. "Taking notes from Cousins". My God, you guys are cute. I don't even know what to say to this anti-Kirk-Bruce-Allenitis-infected type of disease currently running through the fanbase. It's too much.
  13. Well, you certainly have succeeded at being difficult, so well done. I personally don't buy the "he was rusty" narrative. I didn't back then and I don't now. A mind like his? Someone who, wherever he goes, is successful at the highest of levels? Nah. Maybe I could buy it initially in 2014 for the first few games, and even if we want to really push it maaaybe I'll buy it for the first season (but I'd argue it was more just the general woes of most coaches starting anew with a bad team)... but Gibbs would knock whatever rust off he had really quickly. Football is football. Pass, run, block, tackle. The differences over time are really incremental and anyone smart enough can adjust. Furthermore, doesn't that fly in the face of the coaches he surrounded himself with? Do you think Gregg Williams was "rusty"? What happened in 2006 when Gregg lead an historically bad defense? Al Saunders was hired off of an extremely successful stint with the Chiefs who had one of the best offense's in the league under him. Was he rusty? There's just no way I can really buy into that. The biggest difference, really, was how different and difficult team-building had become in an ultra-competitive, parity-based system where every team is on a level playing field with limited resources. I believe we got something very close to Gibbs in his prime. He just didn't have Bobby Beathard, was in charge of personnel himself (which is why I don't even agree with you in terms of calling it a "Vinny Cerrato team", because he had final say on personnel as Team President), and struggled because of said structure and the resulting personnel, nothing else. If you really look at this without emotion, if it was anyone other than the Redskins or Gibbs... would you really be calling it "remarkable" in terms of what was accomplished? I mean, we have to think big picture here. One playoff win 4 years that they barely eked out with next to no offense (I believe we broke a record at the time for least amount of offense in a playoff win). Making the playoffs both times were desperation runs that came at the end of the season. Nothing came even remotely close to being easy. Nothing could be sustained for any extended period of time. So, yes, while I agree that Gibbs himself was and is remarkable, and I believe we got that same remarkable Gibbs at Head Coach while he was here, I don't think what was accomplished really was "remarkable" overall as a franchise. And all it does is further provide evidence of my views. HOF-level coaching couldn't overcome everything else.
  14. I am absolutely open to this distribution as being more accurate. I’ve honestly fluctuated myself on it and have been right where you are. Especially with the rules now in place for QBs. Only reason I moved away from putting them as equals is because, in the end, coaches have to coach the entire roster and there’s a lot more of them, lol. But yeah, could go either way. Yup, pretty much.
  15. Mostly speculation on my end, and I hate to do that which is why I haven’t really commented directly on it yet, but based on what Moses said... I think Trent is essentially answering the question of “why all the injuries” for us right now. Basically, it’s a medical staff that is notorious for misdiagnosing player’s ailments and their healing time which then ends up with them suffering worse injuries while playing when they shouldn’t have been. Or not, lol. Just fascinating how this is all coming out like this and the noise is now almost entirely directed at the medical staff. Seems purposeful and intentional.
  16. Outlier. Key word there. And, to be frank, I was hoping to avoid a response like this when I purposely stated things like “a consistent team win-loss record” as well as it being “over an extended period of time”. So, yeah, outlier is an outlier. No one is going to get away with that for any extended period of time. No one. Again, see above. Gibbs 2.0 had an overall losing record and a win percentage of .469. Saying he “guided a team to the playoffs twice” belies just how difficult it was to do so and how quickly we exited said playoffs. Gibbs 2.0 is actually the perfect example of what I’m talking about. It is pretty extraordinary and does show how great he was, as I implied in that post here, but it also shows that even his level of coaching could only do so much: That being said, comparing it to other coaches is really difficult and I don’t agree. Gibbs did have the advantage of having a way more veteran roster built aggressively to “win now” that didn’t require much player development. It’s not apples to apples.
  17. Agreed, it’s a lot of it. I argue most of it, but either way I don’t think I’m taking any credit away from Belichick. I didn’t even get into how good I think he is, but what I did do was respond to you overplaying what he has to “figure out” and, therefore, how silly it is to ever make the comparisons people make with “what Belichick would do”. The organizational benefits Tom Brady brings are so ridiculously significant it makes it damned near impossible to replicate the Patriots in anything. Those advantages are real no matter how good Belichick is or isn’t. I think the confusion here lies in the difference of just how much importance you and I place on coaching at the pro level, where you put way more than I do. It’s really a philosophical discussion about Pro Football more than it is about Belichick’s abilities. Yeah, definitely disagree with just putting it as “Brady was there”. He was as big a key to everything they did. Yes, their defense and Belichick’s leadership was important, but Brady was ultra efficient. It put them over the top. Definitely wouldn’t say “a lot of their early success” was based on what you think. Maybe equally spread out, at best, but I think most recognized at the time that Brady was pretty special. “He wasn’t Brady yet” because no one could know at the time that they were watching the start of the greatest QB in NFL history’s career, so I put little significance into that. And it’s hard to put what his competitiveness and attitude alone did for the team into quantifiable stats, so just because he wasn’t lighting up the league for passing yards at that point wasn’t indicative of much to me. Especially now that we know who Brady is. Now, here’s where we converge on Belichick. A significant part of Brady’s success is because Belichick fostered him and developed him properly. So he gets major kudos for that. That is undeniable. How significant it was is arguable and we’ll probably never know, though. And my entire point is it becomes so easy to have “long term accountability” and it’s easy to establish this type of culture when you look over behind Center and it’s TOM FRIGGIN BRADY. I even said it in my post. Brady helps the Pats in countless ways. It’s not just about playing QB. The above that you pointed out is one thing I specifically mentioned regarding culture building. The notion that Belichick is this incomparable genius who simply NOONE can emulate drives me nuts. The biggest reason he can’t be emulated is BECAUSE OF TOM BRADY. I’m 100% convinced that had Jay done the exact same thing you mentioned here and lost a Super Bowl for it you’d be posting 10 times per minute about how utterly stupid he is. I’m not even exaggerating. That is how much you’d post about it. I don’t care what you tell me, you would. Belichick has so much more leeway because of Brady and because of what they’ve accomplished in the past. It’s like an avalanche of culture establishing that gained momentum with every pass Brady threw in his career. He CAN do that kind of thing without losing the entire locker room. He can get away with more mistakes than anyone else in the league because Brady will compensate. Who is going to dare rebel in that environment? And STILL, even then, there were reports that people within the locker room were divided. It is not a coincidence that every coach that has tried to establish the so-called “Patriot Way” elsewhere ended up failing. You need Tom Brady who’s going to give you a previously unheard of amount of organizational advantages. Belichick can be the greatest coach ever, I don’t really care to argue that point (I will go to bat for Gibbs on this because he won it all three times without the comfort of one elite QB). But I will adamantly remain on my belief, with tons of evidence and clear examples behind it, that it simply doesn’t matter how good a coach is if the organization itself isn’t up to par (or you don’t have Tom Brady to make it so). Belichick is not going to be nearly as successful establishing what he’s established anywhere else without Brady or, at least, someone that comes somewhat near his greatness. I’m not too fond of putting this into numbers because it’s never going to be exactly quantifiable and I even slightly fluctuate myself here and there... but I’ve come to divide the percentages attributed to consistent team win-loss record at the pro level like this: General Player Personnel: 50% Coaching: 30% QB: 20% Side note: This is ONLY at the pro level. The further removed you get from the NFL (where you have a salary cap, a draft, and finite roster space, which makes resource management vital), the more coaching itself matters. At the pee wee level, for instance, everybody is getting the kids in their area for the most part. There is little to no choosing. The best coaches will succeed more often than not. But, even then, if one team has a ridiculously good player it’s usually over for everyone. Back to the above distribution of percentages. You can be the greatest coach ever and be filling that entire percentage up, but if the personnel acquisition is not up to par it won’t matter a whole lot. If the resource management and team-building strategy is, say, at a 10% level, the QB skill is at a 10% level and the coaching is at the full 30%... that’s still just 50% total, so you’ll be average on the field over an extended period of time. That is essentially with a HOF level coach leading the way. I believe we saw something resembling the above distribution during Gibbs 2.0, give or take. If the general player personnel acquired are, say, top level (but not perfect) at 40% in terms of talent and cohesion (roster with numerous elite players, a bunch of other good players that complement each other’s skill sets, and avoids redundancy in skill sets so as to be as adaptable and flexible as necessary), the QB skill is at the full 20% (HOF level play), and the coaching adds little at 5% you’d STILL win about 65% of the time. The coach would essentially have to actively sabotage the roster and game plan... he’d have to be a net negative to lose. Like, someone just off the street that has no idea about football. And even then the locker room might overcome his idiocy and make enough plays on their own. Now, that applies to everyone in a normal organizational setup, but then when you apply it to the Pats... Brady even adds more value to that formula at QB because he takes a percentage of coaching himself AND helps with the general player acquisition. So, for the Pats it looks something like this, give or take: Brady: Full 20% QB skill + 7.5% Coaching ability + 7.5% general player personnel (due to cap space relief he willingly provides them) = 35% Belichick is in charge of coaching and player acquisition, so even if he’s just average in both of those categories they’re going to win 70%+ of their games with that kind of help from Brady. And that’s pretty much what they do. Heck, let’s say he’s providing the full 22.5% of coaching ability with Brady helping on offense like he does at 7.5%... if Belichick adds no value in terms of the rest of the personnel acquisition he’s still going to end up with an above average record (57.5%). But he’s better than that, which is why they’re better than above average. There is no analogous situation in the NFL to the Pats. What Brady gives them, what he frees up for the organization in terms of resource and time management, is simply astounding. It’s unprecedented. And it likely will stay that way because: 1) He’s married to someone who has generational wealth that even exceeds his own; 2) He’s played for so long and gotten paid at a high level for so long that it made it easier to take that route, and finally; 3) He just might be getting something under the table in terms of him and Kraft being in business together. There is certainly evidence of it: https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/report-patriots-pay-a-brady-owned-company-run-by-suspect-partner/ So, yeah, it’s unlikely we’ll ever see something to this level again. And it’s why I can’t help but chuckle whenever anyone says “what would Belichick do”.
  18. "Figure out how to make it work". Tom. Brady. That's how that works. That's pretty much how all their advantages as an organization works. For God's sake, Brady's willingly giving them cap relief that is historically unheard of, which is then used mostly on defensive help because you can get away with being cheaper on offense BECAUSE FRIGGIN TOM BRADY. He's arguably the greatest offensive coordinator in the league AND he's got elite QB traits so Belichick and company get to see it on the field directly. Imagine Joe Gibbs' offensive mind in his prime with an elite QB skillset to go along with it. The dude literally runs their offense for them. Why do all these coaches who leave Brady never succeed elsewhere!? Top ten salary cap hits for the Pats this year? 6 out of that goes to defensive players. The top three cap hits right after Brady? ALL DEFENSIVE PLAYERS. Top 15 cap hits? 9 are defensive players! 60%! Oh, and guess what position those players on offense there in the top 15 play on the most? Oline! To PROTECT TOM FRIGGIN BRADY. Out of the 6 offensive players, 3 of them play on the Oline (2 of whom are in the top 6 right below those 3 aforementioned defensive players that come after Brady). So just to go over this, of the players taking over 1.5% of the cap of the Pats (including Brady), 60% of them are defensive players. Out of the minority offensive players,HALF OF them come on the Oline (again, that's including Brady, so really it's more significant as only James White and Julian Edelman are the other two players and they only make more than one Olineman - the other two are well ahead of them). Source: https://www.spotrac.com/nfl/new-england-patriots/cap/ "Figure out how to make it work". I mean, when I think of the kind of organizational advantages Tom Brady gives the Pats... it's outrageous, really. The ease of which they get to manage their resources is simply absurd. And this isn't even beginning to get into what it means for the coaching time allocated to player development, game-planning, in-game strategy, establishing culture, etc... that he alone frees up for them all. Sometimes I pray we'd hire Belichick here under the same organizational structure (he'd never agree to that) or even under the one they've got there where he's football emperor so the fans who continuously get caught up in actually believing they can dissect pro-level coaching with any accuracy would realize just how utterly foolish they are. But then they'd probably just say he's "lost his touch" or the "game has passed him by" as they detail their brilliant analyses as to what needs to change while ignoring the fundamental team-building/resource management problems that will hinder ANYONE brought in here. But that's like cutting off my nose to spite my face. I'd rather they'd just get their crap together organizationally, structure it the way most successful franchises have in the past, and all work in unison towards the common goal of winning on the field with top level resource management and team-building strategies. That'd be nice.
  19. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    They’ve got a decent amount of good players, like any NFL roster does. I’d take any of Robby Anderson, Quincy Enunwa, Jamal Adams, Marcus Maye, Trumaine Johnson, Osemele, Chris Herndon, Avery Williamson and Leonard Williams. Most of those guys would likely be too expensive, though. But you never know right now. Gase can do something silly. That’s the point, lol. *Edit* I just saw on twitter right now the Chiefs are already in on the fun.
  20. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    Bruce needs to get on the phone with Gase ASAP. The time is now to capitalize. You just know there’s a good player or two there Gase doesn’t like for some reason and will sell low. Or he’s just overwhelmed and can get bamboozled. Whatever, just capitalize. I’m only half kidding here. Actually, screw that, I’m not kidding at all. That being said Santos and co. haven’t necessarily been good at pro personnel (or Bruce isn’t listening), so I don’t know if we’d actually nab the right guy from them, lol. Still, I hope they try.
  21. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    Yeah, that’s the fear. Like I mentioned, there’s even the issue of Jay possibly knowing he’s a goner, which would mean he has no investment in developing Haskins. Which would be a travesty, as I do believe Jay can do a lot of good for Haskins and is an asset in terms of developing QBs. I just don’t see Jay being like that, even if he feels that way. He enjoys coaching young guys, is a good guy himself who gets along with most people, and even when justified hasn’t shown open insubordination. I think he’ll just coach Haskins like he would if he knew he was here long term. But that is a legit concern to have. And Jay wouldn’t even be in the wrong if he sees that developing Haskins might take time he doesn’t have and, therefore, as secondary to him just focusing on coaching the best group they assembled for him to “win now”.
  22. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    Yup, that’s the ideal. If your plan was to spend big in the draft to get a QB to develop as the franchise guy, then you should’ve either extended the coach you want him developing under or fired him and chosen said coach. The timing is definitely off here, which isn’t anything new for Dan’s organizational habits, but there are ways to overcome it. Like I said, the best thing going for us is that Jay’s offensive teachings will be applicable to the vast majority of offense’s in the NFL. It’s extremely unlikely Haskins will be learning different footwork, progressions, and general route concepts from someone else they hire.
  23. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    Spot on, and this is what I largely mean when I say “sound FO”. Basically, the organization won't always be bumbling about structurally and/or philosophically, changing its ways at its very core (which makes them act in a reactionary manner versus being proactive). It would have a steady strategy with regards to acquiring player personnel, how they fit in with each other, and it would know what kind of coach to bring in for that, giving him an environment with the highest likelihood of success. You don’t ever want to be set up at a position or phase and then just lose it all almost over night. There are rare exceptions if/when you decide to emphasize something more important, maybe because that’s what is available during that offseason or you’re answering/getting ahead of some new concept/cycle occurring in the NFL. But then you’d be trading one strength for another. Not simply nullifying a strength and leaving it at that. Especially when your HC is really good at maximizing said strength. It’s definitely not easy as you’re juggling the cap and limited resources while you attempt to do all this, and you don’t ever just want to totally ignore other positions or phases and only focus on strengths, but that’s what Execs/GMs get paid to do. And the NFL is set up for everyone to be on a level playing field. One of my biggest problems with how the organization has operated is how they essentially punish staff members, or players for that matter, when they excel at something. So instead of allowing them to thrive at what they’re good at, they essentially say, “well, you’re good at this so we don’t need to help you there, let’s give you trash to work with now or put trash around you, you’ll be fine, you always figure it out”. And, sure, they might get by. They might be ok. But they never get to really thrive, either, do they? They never get to just dominate at that specific aspect or phase or position. When Doug mentioned, some time last year, how, “Jay’s offense always produces a 4,000 yard passer, no worries”, or something like that I damn near had an heart attack. Or when the question was posed to Jay about the Dline and he said something like Tomsula will make a NT (he’s not in charge of personnel decisions, so he’s just repeating the company line there). As good as Tomsula is, once Allen went out with injury in 2017 that Dline completely fell apart. They couldn’t stop the run to save their lives. Don’t punish people because they’re good at their jobs. Let them thrive. Reward them instead. Expend more resources and emphasize the areas they’re good at so they can dominate at it. Otherwise you’re essentially forcing a team-building philosophy of just being average everywhere. It’s like the thinking is when someone does good or some phase is strong on the team? Welp, don’t worry about that part, it’s fine, let’s focus here now! Which is why it was great when we not only brought in Callahan, but drafted Scherff with our top pick to go along with all the significant resources we’d already expended at the Oline. Which is why it was good that we drafted Allen and Payne for Tomsula back to back and are allowing them to be a real strength of the team (though one can question whether or not the ideal would’ve been to trade for/acquire via FA a legit interior Dlineman and then pick a guy like James if it’s true that they forced the Payne pick a little bit... but that all goes back to resource management, so I digress). But yeah, it’s an absolute travesty just how far we’ve fallen in terms of offensive personnel, specifically with regards to the passing game, since those days. It’s unacceptable just how many steps we took backwards there. Haskins is going to need a lot more from the FO than what has been provided since then if he’s going to succeed. Like @goskins10 mentioned, drafting McLaurin is a good sign they understand that. Just has to actually pan out, but the idea is right.
  24. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    Well, you and like maaaaaaybe two other posters! Great point, as usual from you.
  25. thesubmittedone

    The Bruce Allen/GM Thread

    The argument that you need a legit QB to succeed in a sustainable manner is sound, but I think what often gets lost, glossed over, or ignored is how much the organization/environment itself has to do with one emerging. What I’ve come to understand about this after a lot of research on it is that there is essentially a baseline of talent necessary for a QB to have (accuracy, pocket presence/elusiveness, and leadership are the biggest things), but once that baseline is there it really comes down to these 5 criteria for an organization to find or have one emerge: A) Sound FO (I believe this is the most significant factor to the rest of the criteria below being implemented properly) B ) Resources Willingly* Spent C) Stable System of Development D) Patience (with the right guy once he starts) E) Wisdom to know when to move on (from the wrong guy) * "Willingly" here is meant to imply that they brought in QBs without necessarily having an immediate need or due to injury, as well as the willingness to spend valuable resources on the position, not just an undrafted FA here and there or something, or even a cheap veteran Free Agent backup. I made a thread a few years ago going over many examples of this in the NFL. But for the sake of time a quick, recent and very relevant example of this would be Kirk Cousins’ emergence here. Virtually every criterion was met. It only happened as a result of: 1) Scot’s role at the time (which speaks to a sound organizational structure/process); 2) The resources willingly spent on the position (not only acquiring RG3 in 2012, but taking him in the 4th because of the value they had assigned to him - a 2nd round grade); 3) Having been in Gruden’s offense for a year as well as having previously been in an offense under the Shanny’s that largely employed the same passing concepts (which gave him a somewhat stable system of development) and, finally; 4) Patience in sticking with him once he was deemed the 2015 starter as the questions and pressure mounted (which culminated in the Tampa game). Of course, none of that matters if Kirk didn’t have that baseline of talent to emerge, which would’ve then involved the 5th criterion of knowing when to move on. It’s too early to be sure, but I do think Haskins has that baseline. At least, he did in college. We’ve seen just how often it doesn’t translate to the pros where everyone is bigger, faster and smarter. But there’s a lot there to suggest he does have it and it will translate. The bigger question now is, are the other criteria going to be met? I really would rather not get into the soundness of our FO/organizational process right now. I think most know at this point how I feel about it and it’s a big reason why I largely stay away from discussing the Skins in general. Criterion 2 has certainly been met. He’s a first rounder, which alone would’ve been enough, but he comes after having spent large amounts of cap space, a 3rd rounder, and a young defensive stud on both Kirk and Alex the last few years. Criterion 3 will depend on Jay’s status with the team. The timing is off here, as he’s entering his second to last year on his contract and it’s unlikely he’ll coach without an extension. If it were up to me I’d extend his contract one more year right now to ensure he has, at least, through 2020 to allow Haskins to develop under him. The fear could be that Jay simply doesn’t care about Haskins’ development if he knows he’s a dead coach walking, but Jay for all intents and purposes has proven to be a good guy and a good soldier, even when he doesn’t get what he wants... so it’s doubtful he’ll be an hindrance. If not extended, then the key will be what they do after he’s let go. The good news is, Jay’s offense is sound and applicable to any modern, pro-offense. So the field is expansive in terms of finding a new coach who will continue to provide a stable and consistent system of development for Haskins that doesn’t radically shift Jay’s approach. Criteria 4 and 5 will have to do with 1, of course, and that all remains to be seen. But, hey, it’s going to be fascinating to watch. Which is more than I can say for what’s gone on the last year or so.