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ixcuincle

2016/2017 Winter Weather Thread

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21 minutes ago, d0ublestr0ker0ll said:

 

It's definitely taken on the idea that the storm moving northeast = why it's called a nor'easter, but the high winds towards the northeast associated with these storms are what is directly responsible for them getting the name.

 

The term was coined a few hundred years ago, long before radar and a good understanding of weather patterns.  Buffalo is in the northeast, it gets wrecked worse than New England, but not by nor'easters.

 

Imagine being in 1750, in Richmond, and getting belted by "one them storms with the nor'easterly winds."  You'd know right then to run to the market for bread and milk.

 

excellent dissertation on the premise of the word colloquialism, as referenced in my reply to you.  carry on.

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2 hours ago, dchogs said:

 

excellent dissertation on the premise of the word colloquialism, as referenced in my reply to you.  carry on.

 

Oh, see, I thought you said colonialism......

 

*slowly exits thread*

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Posted (edited)

It is correct that the name derived from wind direction, not location. Just for clarity though, the winds blow FROM the Northeast, not towards it. Northeasterly winds actually blow Southwest. It's another holdover from REALLY old school tech... They used the direction weather vanes would point, which of course is the opposite of the direction it's actually blowing.

 

In the case of Nor'easters, the cyclone effect means the strongest winds end up coming from the Northeast.

 

Edited by techboy
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1 hour ago, techboy said:

It is correct that the name derived from wind direction, not location. Just for clarity though, the winds blow FROM the Northeast, not towards it. Northeasterly winds actually blow Southwest. It's another holdover from REALLY old school tech... They used the direction weather vanes would point, which of course is the opposite of the direction it's actually blowing.

 

In the case of Nor'easters, the cyclone effect means the strongest winds end up coming from the Northeast.

 

And how Superstorm Sandy happened...an already volatile storm and a Nor'easter combined.  I watched a half a dozen docs on it.

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10 hours ago, Springfield said:

 

Where?

 

I'm seeing 1-2 feet for D.C.  The GFS just gave D.C. about 18 inches of snow.

 

weather.com

 

https://weather.com/weather/tenday/l/22046:4:US

 

Quote

Snow during the morning will transition to snow showers during the afternoon.  Temps nearly steady in the mid 30s.  Winds NNW at 10 to 20 mph.  Chance of snow 90%.  Snow accumulating 1 to 3 inches.

 

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All the models are hammering Loudoun County. Some with 20+ and some with a foot. Looks like I have to spend the afternoon getting the snow blower ready. 

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China, for Monday night they list 8-12 inches.  Of course we'll see how that plays out in the end.

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ne-snow-map-march-12.jpg

 

I see us in the 6-12 inch band, but near the edge of 3-6.  This looks like a typical storm where it will be heavier to the north and west. Looks like just a slight shift and we don't get much.  

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3 hours ago, techboy said:

In the case of Nor'easters, the cyclone effect means the strongest winds end up coming from the Northeast.

 

interesting... that, I didn't know. 

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Thanks techboy.  I knew the thing about wind direction which made me a little confused putting it all together but that makes sense.

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Posted (edited)

Damn, daylight savings hits and you guys are gonna get a foot of snow. Wacky weather indeed..seems March snow storms are the new normal 

Edited by Skinz4Life12

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, China said:

 

There's nothing new about March snowstorms in DC.

 

http://wtop.com/weather/2017/03/look-back-d-c-s-biggest-march-snowstorms/slide/1/

 

 

 

That's true, but I frequently hear people say how it winter is basically over by March in the DC area and I always wonder how they could forget that some of the biggest storms come in March

Edited by Skinz4Life12

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, techboy said:

It is correct that the name derived from wind direction, not location. Just for clarity though, the winds blow FROM the Northeast, not towards it. Northeasterly winds actually blow Southwest. It's another holdover from REALLY old school tech... They used the direction weather vanes would point, which of course is the opposite of the direction it's actually blowing.

 

In the case of Nor'easters, the cyclone effect means the strongest winds end up coming from the Northeast.

 

 

Ugh, been over a decade since reading up the history/origins of the term.  I knew it was the wind, at least.  Can I get a quarter of a cookie?  

 

Anyway, I haven't been keeping up with this one since I'm not in the area anymore.  Sounds like models shifted it west and revved it up?  They all showing big solutions for DC?

 

I'm wallowing in cold wind this week, after that damn mini summer we had last week.  Nothing else.  Mid-west weather sucks.

Edited by d0ublestr0ker0ll

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2 hours ago, China said:

 

There's nothing new about March snowstorms in DC.

We had one here in ATL around St. Patrick's day back in the early 90s.  Never seen people freak out like that before.  :ols:

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Would any of you all have any predictions on when I'd be able to get out of Dulles for my business trip?  I'm currently slated to leave Tuesday morning at 8 am but obviously that doesn't sound likely to happen.

 

I'm wondering if planes would normally be taking off by Tuesday afternoon/night or if it would be longer for a storm like this.

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I wouldn't bet on it. The latest runs seem to be providing more evidence for high totals. 

 

That said, I am neither a meteorologist nor an air traffic controller. 

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Posted (edited)

Nice pop, should be heaviest in the DC area overnight.  Can barely tell from ix's pic, but the cutoff south of DC is a heartbreaker for snow lovers.  Middle of March, is what it is.  Have fun bastages.

Edited by d0ublestr0ker0ll

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And of course western Loudoun will still end up well over a foot. Because it couldn't snow just enough for sledding, no it's gotta dump enough to make it WORK to move it. 

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1 hour ago, Kosher Ham said:

You go sledding ? 

Ok. 

Most normal people with children and any version of a hill do. 

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