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AJE: Why the Philippine 'Punisher' could be president

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I'm not sure smiling and pretending all is well is a great reaction by the US to this.  First of all we should be condemning this mans actions as should the rest of the civilized world.  We've gotten entirely too comfortable with the idea of looking away at the worst kinds of abuses, particularly in Asia.  China is literally using political prisoners as raw materials for their organ transplant industry and now the Philippines has engaged in the slaughter of suspected drug users.  If that weren't bad enough they are openly siding with US rivals while insulting the US President publicly on a weekly basis. 

Issuing a "yeah we don't agree with that, but otherwise we're still great friends" looks more like cowardice than conviction.  Does reacting this way really help us in the long term?  I don't want Obama to pop off or have Donald Trump to mean tweet Duterte, but there is something to be said for demanding a certain level of respect. 

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I'm Filipino, don't condone him, but you'd be shocked how many Filipinos living there actually do support him. On some level, I get it, it's easy to live in a first world country where the rule of law is in force. But it's chaos there—the cops are just as corrupt as the criminals (as are the politicians).  

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33 minutes ago, Elessar78 said:

I'm Filipino, don't condone him, but you'd be shocked how many Filipinos living there actually do support him. On some level, I get it, it's easy to live in a first world country where the rule of law is in force. But it's chaos there—the cops are just as corrupt as the criminals (as are the politicians).  

 

Most of my cousins by marriage (that now live in Canada) support him. But I'm not convinced that death squads that murder kids on the street (and being written off as a acceptable collateral damage) is the answer. Nor is murdering potheads. 

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All I know is our world history tells us that these situations always end horribly, for everyone. I imagine it won't be very long before some of that support evaporates 

 

Edited by Mr. Sinister

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49 minutes ago, Mr. Sinister said:

All I know is our world history tells us that these situations always end horribly, for everyone. I imagine it won't be very long before some of that support evaporates 

 

 

I suspect it will come right before the Chinese become their new overlords. 

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Has the State department issued its "This is fine, everything is fine" statement yet?  I'd hate to miss it.

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Quote

The Philippines' national police chief on Thursday suspended dozens of officers involved in violent clashes with anti-US protesters, as he voiced anger at one of his men ramming activists with a van.

At the rally outside the US embassy in Manila on Wednesday, the van reversed quickly into dozens of people then forward again, running over at least two protesters. The driver said shortly afterwards he panicked as he feared being mobbed.

Thirty demonstrators and 32 police were injured in the clashes, which also saw the authorities fire tear gas and the protesters strike out with batons.

"I am saddened and angered," national police chief Ronald Dela Rosa said in a statement.

"Police forces are under strict instructions as a matter of policy, to exercise maximum tolerance in such public assemblies."

Nine senior officers and 40 lower-ranking policemen were suspended pending an investigation into the incident, chief superintendent Oscar Albayalde, head of police in the national capital region, told AFP.

Quote

Hundreds of protesters had gathered outside the embassy to express support for President Rodrigo Duterte's foreign policy shift away from the United States, the Philippines' longstanding ally and mutual defence partner

Police insisted the protesters had instigated the violence, saying the group did not have a permit, breached security lines, and threw paint and debris at the embassy gates.

But the protesters accused the police of being at fault.

"What the police did was unjustifiable and totally unnecessary. Are these the same people who should be in uniform? They should be ashamed," Edre Olalia, lawyer for the protesters, told AFP.

Duterte, who was in Beijing for a four-day visit, said he was waiting for official reports into the incident and did not want to engage in a "blame game".

 

Edited by visionary

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When was the last time an ally, uh, broke up with the US?  Honestly don't know.

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At the end of the day, I feel bad for the Filipinos who are still there (even though it appears that most of them support this dictator). They have rampant corruption, crime, and drug problems...and perhaps it takes a madman to clean it up - but at what cost? 

And although I tend to think China will take over as soon as the US is run out..I'm not sure what strategically they have to offer the Chinese anymore?

 

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I wonder just how much Xi had to wire to Duterte's swiss bank account to get him to sell out his entire country like that.  

Let the natural resources pillaging commence.   

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4 hours ago, The Evil Genius said:

At the end of the day, I feel bad for the Filipinos who are still there (even though it appears that most of them support this dictator). They have rampant corruption, crime, and drug problems...and perhaps it takes a madman to clean it up - but at what cost? 

And although I tend to think China will take over as soon as the US is run out..I'm not sure what strategically they have to offer the Chinese anymore?

 

 

Nickel.  Copper.  Chromium.  There are vast forests to be clearcut and fisheries to be overfished.  In addition, the Philippines will drop their opposition to the Chinese power grab for exclusive control of the entire South China sea, which not only has oil, but also has the busiest shipping lanes in the world.  

I really do wonder how much they had to bribe him.   He seems like he would sell out cheaply.

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The more I read about this dude..holy smokes. 

http://www.wsj.com/articles/behind-philippine-leaders-break-with-the-u-s-a-lifetime-of-resentment-1477061118

 

Quote
History’s scars

The son of a provincial governor on Mindanao, Mr. Duterte grew up in a troubled region with ample cause to resent both Manila and Washington. A largely Muslim area in an overwhelmingly Catholic nation, it was never fully conquered by Spain. When the U.S. took over, Mindanao’s sultanates put up stiff resistance.

For Mindanaons, the colonial experience left scars and a hatred of perceived oppression and disrespect, says Ms. Duterte, the president’s sister, who lives in Davao City, Mindanao’s largest. She says their grandmother, a Muslim, helped Mr. Duterte come to believe that Washington was guilty of crimes during its invasion and colonization.

He was a rebel from the start, say friends and family. As a boy, he was expelled from his strait-laced Jesuit school for squirting blue ink on a priest, recalls Mr. Dureza. At high school he was a brawler. “He always had that hair-trigger temper,” says Carlos Dominguez III, a childhood friend and now Mr. Duterte’s finance secretary.

He staggered into the family home one night, clutching a stab wound from a street fight, his sister says. He later shot a college classmate in the leg in reprisal for an attack on a friend, Mr. Dureza says, noting that the other man recovered and Mr. Duterte faced no legal blowback.

 

At university in Manila, he studied politics under Jose Maria Sison, who later founded the Communist Party of the Philippines and in 1969 launched an armed insurrection. Mr. Sison, now in exile in the Netherlands, says he schooled Mr. Duterte in what he viewed as the evils of American imperialism and the corrupt nexus of business and political families who have ruled the Philippines at the expense of ordinary Filipinos—a system Mr. Duterte has pledged to upend.

 

Edited by The Evil Genius

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God I hate this new software. Can't even edit that ****ing post now to get rid of that photo. 

 

Ok..so I found a workaround. But still. Grrr.

Edited by The Evil Genius
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you don't want to get rid of that photo... my grandfather is in that photo!   :)

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Just now, mcsluggo said:

you don't want to get rid of that photo... my grandfather is in that photo!   :)

 

Sorry. If anyone wants to see it, its on the WSJ link I posted. 

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That guy is an idiot and the people deserve what they get for voting for him. I had empathy for them. Had. 

 

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