squatch66

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About squatch66

  • Rank
    The Starter
  • Birthday 07/04/1980

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  • Redskins Fan Since
    birth
  • Favorite Redskin
    wow hard to pick just one
  • Location
    Allen, TX
  • Zip Code
    75013
  • Interests
    golf, cars, watchin the skins, and the ladies!!!!
  • Occupation
    network operations

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  • Birthdate
    7/4/1980

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635 profile views
  1. I would be really happy with scenario 4 but holy **** I would be over the moon with #3. I could take or leave Trubisky. Maybe Gruden is going to get the chance to pick his own guy and sink or swim with him. I know the guy is divisive, but Mixon is another Zeke. He would take our offense to another planet. But my favorite part of this draft would be getting Jaleel Johnson, Charles Walker, and Stevie Tu'ikolovatu in the 4th round or later. Johnson and Walker are starter level talents and Stevie is a decent rotational nose imo. I doubt this happens though. I could see Johnson and Walker going earlier. Maybe 3rd-4th round. Other guys that I like that could swap at certain spots would be OJ Howard(mancrush), Tomlinson (great nose with some pass rush potential), Adams, Chris Godwin, and Davis Webb.
  2. Just watched Ross' 40. The thing that struck me is how smooth and effortless it looked. Very DJax like.
  3. Been away for a bit but lurking. I was going to post about the combine but the site stored my last typed up post on my phone. It actually seems a little more appropriate since new info has come to light. OK I'm on record as saying we need to pay Kirk and build around him. He is the best qb for this team. Sure he's prone to throwing the back breaking pick, but he's also prone to those magical runs where he can carve up any defense in front of him. You telling me that Kirk with a strong running game and defense can't make a run? You're outta your mind! I don't think that money is an issue since the cap is projected to jump next year and the year after next. See what Jameis, Carr, and Mariota sign for when they come up for their deals. However, since this is the draft thread and I dont want it to turn into another runaway freght train Kirk thread, this is all theoretical and what I imagine some kind of contingency plan that the Skins have to at least be thinking about would go: Say Kirk knows that Kyle wants him and is determined see what San Francisco will offer him and basically tells the Skins they will have to overpay to keep him. He tells them he wants 27 mil per and 70 guaranteed or he walks, and not only that but he makes it clear that if he is not signed to a long term deal then he will play out the franchise tag and then walk. If that happens I think you have to explore all options. If the trade offered was the #2 pick, a second next year, and this and next year's 3s as was previously mentioned in this thread, that is a pretty ridiculous haul and gives us 3 1s, 3 2s, and 4 3s over the next two years(personally I don't think we get that much for him. Maybe a 2 this year and a 1 and 3 next year). I'd do one of two things: 1. Move up to #1 and draft Rosen next year. With the extra picks from the Cousins trade, we could afford to move up and still have enough picks to build around him. 2. Draft a Patrick Mahomes/Davis Webb in the 2nd-3rd round range this year and then draft another qb in the same range next year. Let those guys sit and learn while McC builds a team around them and then let them compete for the starting job. I am intrigued by Webb. He has a better arm than Cousins. He also seems to excel at throwing the short stuff and setting his playmakers up for yac. I think he could be decent given a year or two to learn. In that time McC would have a better team around him so that the team can carry the qb, rather than the other way around. Those are just my opinions on gim. I watched the Stanford cut up on draft breakdown to form my opinions. I am not a scout so I'm definitely wrong, but that's just, like, my opinion man. I like Mahomes because of the baseball background. He just screams Matt Stafford gunslinger to me. Anyways, that post ran really long, so thanks if you stayed til the end. My point is that Cousins should be plan a, but we have to be ready for plan b and beyond. I can't speak for others, but that doesn't mean I want him gone. And now to my new post. OJ Howard ran a 4.51. Mancrush. Engage.
  4. I'm on record as saying we need to pay Kirk and build around him. He is the best qb for this team. Sure he's prone to throwing the back breaking pick, but he's also prone to those magical runs where he can carve up any defense in front of him. You telling me that Kirk with a strong running game and defense can't make a run? You're outta your mind! I don't think that money is an issue since the cap is projected to jump next year and the year after next. See what Jameis, Carr, and Mariota sign for when they come up for their deals. However, since this is the draft thread and I dont want it to turn into another runaway freght train Kirk thread, this is all theoretical and what I imagine some kind of contingency plan that the Skins have to at least be thinking about would go: Say Kirk knows that Kyle wants him and is determined see what San Francisco will offer him and basically tells the Skins they will have to overpay to keep him. He tells them he wants 27 mil per and 70 guaranteed or he walks, and not only that but he makes it clear that if he is not signed to a long term deal then he will play out the franchise tag and then walk. If that happens I think you have to explore all options. If the trade offered was the #2 pick, a second next year, and this and next year's 3s as was previously mentioned in this thread, that is a pretty ridiculous haul and gives us 3 1s, 3 2s, and 4 3s over the next two years(personally I don't think we get that much for him. Maybe a 2 this year and a 1 and 3 next year). I'd do one of two things: 1. Move up to #1 and draft Rosen. With the extra picks from the Cousins trade, we could afford to move up and still have enough picks to build around him. 2. Draft a Patrick Mahomes/Davis Webb in the 2nd-3rd round range this year and then draft another qb in the same range next year. Let those guys sit and learn while McC builds a team around them and then let them compete for the starting job. I am intrigued by Webb. He has a better arm than Cousins. He also seems to excel at throwing the short stuff and setting his playmakers up for yac. I think he could be decent given a year or two to learn. In that time McC would have a better team around him so that the team can carry the qb, rather than the other way around. Those are just my opinions on him. I watched the Stanford cut up on draft breakdown to form my opinions. I am not a scout so maybe I'm wrong. Anyways, that post ran really long, so thanks if you stayed til the end. My point is that Cousins should be plan a, but we have to be ready for plan b and beyond. I can't speak for others, but that doesn't mean I want him gone.
  5. I doubt it would happen, but if the Niners were to offer that I think you have to at least think about it... I've been thinking about this lately. Recent history has shown that an increasing number of QB's have come from the 2nd round or later (Kirk, Wilson, Carr, Dak, Dalton). I'd say draft one for a couple years straight, let them sit and learn, and then compete. If we did trade Cousins then that's 2 1s, 2 2s, and 4 3s over the next two years. Use a couple of those nice early 2nd/3rds to get a couple of young guys in here. Or, use some of that ammo to try to move up to 1 to get Rosen. Scott could easily use all those early picks to draft a strong defense and running game that every young qb needs to lean on. Again, this will never happen. Just my opinion on how I would do this in Madden lol
  6. Thanks again for the replies folks. I'm pretty much settled on building my own now. My local micro center has an i7 6700k and Asus mobo bundled for 366. I think that's a pretty good deal. Probably going to go with the 1060 because I don't really have interest in vr games yet. Maybe once the technology gets a little better. Really, I just want it to look good in 1080p and I read that the 1060 is a good option for the price. Looking at a giant case with built in fans so I can expand later when I'm ready.
  7. Thanks for the replies. I've been pricing out my own stuff using the build guide over at http://www.build-gaming-computers.com/gaming-desktop-computer.html I was looking at doing the mid level build since I'm not going to be super hardcore about gaming. It just seemed that I would pay as much if not more than the pre-assembled one. One thing my friend did say to me was that with the pre-assembled units you don't know what brand of components are used. For games, I'm not really sure. I started playing Ark and was really getting into it. I find that the sandbox games are pretty cool. Never tried a shooter. I usually just play those on my console.
  8. I'm thinking about taking the plunge and getting myself a gaming PC. I found this guy over at Costco: https://www.costco.com/iBUYPOWER-C-i13-Gaming-Desktop---7th-Generation-Intel-Core-i7---3GB-NVIDIA-GTX-1060-Graphics.product.100328726.html Can anyone give me any impressions? I've been researching but most of this stuff goes over my head. One of my friends said that it is a good deal for a beginning gamer. I also love the extra year warranty from Costco. I know it's cheaper to build your own computer, but it looks like a comparable build is going to cost me close to what I would spend on this computer. Love to get some advice. Thanks folks.
  9. He will forever be Bob Morton to me. "You're gonna be a bad mother ****er." **** cancer.
  10. I'm still a proponent of Pettine, but I REALLY wanted us to talk to Romeo. Looks like he's winding it down unfortunately.
  11. I stand corrected lol
  12. Admittedly I don't watch college except for when Miami plays. I'm looking for him on draft breakdown. From what I've read and what I've seen tonight I'm sold. Not sure if you saw this but it was awesome. He totally goes to bat for a teammate over a funny incident. http://sports.yahoo.com/news/clemsons-ben-boulware-defends-christian-wilkins-inappropriate-grab-of-curtis-samuel-194524485.html
  13. You could just tell how much he wanted it. He could be our next London Fletcher. What he lacks physically, he makes up for with his intangibles. I think I posted it in here but I found an article about him and what a leader he is on that defense. I think that @Rattlesnake88 and I are the first two on the bandwagon lol
  14. Sorry, but I just don't see that. If we could, I would trade Kirk for Ben straight up in a hot second. I don't doubt that if the only swap was QB's then no Ben probably wouldn't have a ring with us yet, but no way Kirk has two, let alone one. Kirk is nowhere near as good as Ben is at the off schedule plays, which is where Ben tends to make his biggest plays. Pittsburgh's line has more coverage breakdowns and he would end up taking more sacks and probably tossing a few more ints. Behind our line, Ben would throw for 5k and 35 tds. Kirk needs a line like ours where he has good protection and only has to make a few off schedule plays. Now don't get me wrong, I like Kirk and he is our guy, but he is not a qb that can bail out his team like Roethlisberger can.
  15. I posted this over in the defensive changes thread but it also applies here. I'm now a huge proponent of Pettine, and if that catches on around here I'd better get the credit for it I saw this in Keim's article about Pettine interviewing: http://mmqb.si.com/2014/06/19/mike-pettine-cleveland-browns-coach I gotta say, I really hope that Pettine is our guy. I'd like to see him coaching guys McC picks. I really liked this from the article. Long read but worth it: So back to the defense, which will have a big say in the final result of Pettine’s first season. As a football junkie, this is the real reason I traveled to Berea. I have loved watching the Ryan-Pettine scheme operate, especially against the best quarterbacks in the game. There’s no better scheme in today’s NFL. Just go look at what the Jets have done since Ryan’s arrival, what Pettine did in Buffalo last year, and what former Jets assistant Bob Sutton did with the Chiefs last season. When I watch the system operate on the coaches film cut, I see organized chaos. Every pre-snap look is different from the ensuing coverage and pressure on the play. That messes with the best quarterbacks, who are elite because they win before the snap deciphering the defensive scheme they are about to encounter. But how does a defensive coach get his players to do that? How will Pettine and defensive coordinator Jim O’Neil be able to get the Browns up to speed in their first season? Surely it’s way too complicated for that to happen. Not the way Pettine and O’Neil teach it, which seems to be the key to the system. “I think it's happened quicker here because I think it's a smart group,” Pettine says, comparing the install to last season’s with the Bills. “I'm not saying we were dumb in Buffalo—far from it—but this is a group that I think processes, as a whole, very quickly.” The way Pettine teaches has a lot do with that. It starts with the coaches. The players can’t learn unless the coaches know it inside and out. O’Neil, linebacker coach Chuck Driesbach, assistant linebackers coach Brian Fleury and defensive line coach Anthony Weaver are all veterans of the system, at least back to Buffalo. Assistant defensive backs coaches Bobby Babich and Aaron Glenn, and secondary coach Jeff Hafley, were new to the system. Before the players arrived in the building, O’Neil installed the scheme with the coaches using five years of teaching tape (the best execution of scheme and technique from the Jets and Bills). But there was a lot of give and take, and the newcomers were free to question the whys and hows of the scheme. “They were able to refine it even more and make it more player-friendly from the beginning,” Pettine says. “I think anytime you can install anew, if you can step back instead of just blowing the dust off, here it is, to look at it again and see if it still continues to make sense—they did a good job.” When it comes to teaching the players the scheme, one of the tenets is the sponge theory, which Pettine learned from his father, Mike Pettine Sr., the retired legendary high school football coach at Central Bucks West in Pennsylvania. “It's your job as a coach to keep throwing stuff at them and at some point, you'll get feedback,” Pettine says. “But you're going to have teams, like the 2006 Ravens defense, that had almost like an infinite sponge. We could have 60 calls up on game day, it doesn't matter. Those guys Ed [Reed], Ray [Lewis], Adalius [Thomas], Jarret Johnson—those guys could handle anything you threw at them. If your team's cumulative sponge isn't big, then you might have to back it off a little bit. I think sponge-wise, we're pretty smart. We already have some advanced stuff very quickly. But there's some coaches that each year, teach, This what we run and that's it. They don't ask more of their guys. To me that's coaching. If your guys can do more and you’re not doing more, that's on you. Or if this is your norm and you have a pretty good team and they're just not mentally there, then [expletive] pare it back a little bit.” Pettine has also continued the learning buddy system that goes back to his days as a Ravens assistant. A smarter player will be paired with a player who is not learning the system as quickly. The smarter player will get the minus if his buddy screws up on the play. “One of the rules we had was you never wanted to be limited by your least intelligent player,” Pettine says. “You have to do it that way because if you have a guy that can be elite but he can't be cluttered, like when we got Kris Jenkins in New York for a limited amount of time—when we had him, we didn't want him thinking. We would build it like, 'Hey, line up here and go, and we'll make it right around you.' We'll give the thinking to the guys around you. We've put some of the heavy-lifting thinking on a fewer number of players.” Thomas was one of those guys in Baltimore. David Harris was the guy with the Jets. Safety Jim Leonhard traveled from the Ravens to the Jets to the Bills because nobody knew the scheme better than he did. When it comes to teaching the players, it starts with giving each player an inventory of techniques specific to their position. For example, corners will learn how to play press coverage, man coverage with safety help, playing inside-outside with another player, squat coverage for Cover 2, and so forth. Each player has his own inventory so when he hears the defense being called, he only needs to know two things: how do I get lined up, and what’s my technique? “Then you hope that the coaches have meshed together those 11 jobs so that you have a functional defense,” Pettine says. “Our big saying is, ‘Do your job, good things will happen.’ So we keep them very narrow-minded on, ‘Do your job first.’ A lot of mistakes are made when you're wanting to do somebody else’s job.” When it comes to executing the defense on game day, this is where the real genius of the scheme comes into play, because it allows the unit to appear more multiple and confusing to the quarterback. The chaos, however, plays out as clarity in the minds of the defensive players. The Browns teach the concept of the scheme. For example, with the dime defense, they don’t just tell a player, “This is the dime and this is your job every time we play it.” Initially, they will install the base system and the responsibilities. But then they’ll rotate jobs after a week. So the scheme is the same, but the personnel changes. If the Browns are in dime one week and linebacker Karlos Dansby is rushing in a certain gap, it might be a different player with that responsibility in the next game. That happens throughout that dime defense. Cornerbacks switch with linebackers, linebackers swap with linemen and corners become safeties. Chaos to a quarterback. “For our guy it's easy, and that's the business that we want to be in, something that's easy for us to do, that's hard for the other side to decipher,” Pettine says. “If you're a quarterback that figures out your protection by players, jersey numbers, and now you're trying to identify our stuff, now you're in trouble. We might run the same pressure three weeks in a row, and it's going to look different three times. We have a defensive back doing an end’s job; the next week it’s a different grouping with a linebacker doing it. So to somebody else it's going to look completely different, but for us it's the exact same call.” When it comes to the season, the players aren’t just looking at a playbook with a position against that opponent. The playbook for each opponent has defensive players’ jersey numbers in it. They just look through the playbook for their number and know their assignment that week. And by switching roles, that allows the players to buy in. “If I have a job that's crappy—late contain on the quarterback, that type of thing, I'm a little more likely to have a pretty good attitude doing it because I know next week I might have a job that could potentially be the free runner,” Pettine says of players’ mindsets. “Now they say, ‘OK, I'll do the dirty job this week, knowing that later I'll get the better job.’ ” The final part of the puzzle is to have the entire defense in the meeting room together. It’s few and far between when positions break up, go to their own room and worry about themselves, like most teams operate. “I thought that was one thing that Rex did real well. He kind of tied in the whole room,” Pettine says. “After a while, he'd ask a defensive lineman a question about the cornerback’s technique to see if the guy had been paying attention. It’d be funny to see how much guys would recall in situations like that. Learn the defense as a whole and you execute as one cohesive unit.” For all those that say scheme to your talent, here you go.