Skinsfan1311

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About Skinsfan1311

  • Rank
    The Gadget Play
  • Birthday 03/14/1964

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  • Website URL
    http://
  • Redskins Fan Since
    35yrs
  • Favorite Redskin
    Darrel Green
  • Location
    Section 236 Row 8
  • Zip Code
    21060
  • Interests
    Golfing, Hunting
  • Occupation
    Materials Specalist

Profile Information

  • Birthdate
    1964
  • Interests
    Football, Golf, Hunting, Snowboarding

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  1. What time do I show up? I'll bring the Missus a bottle of bourbon.
  2. I've heard similiar numbers. I guess that those #'s are guidelines. I don't slice 'em and I've never taken one past 203. Next one I'll start to.check at 198°. Each piece of meat is different. I've had 5lb roasts done in 8 hrs, and a 4.5lb one take 11 hours. If it's an older freezer, they're bullet-proof, and if it's out of the direct sun, you should be good.
  3. Outdoor-rated kegerator. Duh!
  4. Yup! Benefits? Not sure. I read that on the Amazing Ribs site, years ago, and it has worked. I've never pulled one below 200. Drawbacks? Again, not sure. I've never had an issue. On the next one, I might check it at a lower temp, maybe 195, and see if it's tender enough. It wouldn't hurt my feelings if I could get finished earlier.
  5. Nope. Same thing. Butt is top part of shoulder. Your problem is meat temp, I can guarantee it..
  6. That could take 14 hrs, or more, at 225°- 270°. Try to go no bigger than 5 lbs. It may be tough to hold temps steady, with that setup that you linked.There is no substitute for a Slow n Sear. You could set up a couple of bricks, on the charcoal grate, (for indirect), light about 10-12 coals, when they're fully lit, place a chunk of hickory, or apple wood on top of it, then dump a chimney starter full of unlit charcoal on top of it. Close bottom vent about 1/2 and top vent about 1/4.That should get you in the ballpark of ~240° and hold for hours, depending on if you have a leaky kettle. Pan of water helps temp control and catches drippings. Good luck
  7. Slow n Sear. It's the best accessory for a Weber kettle that was ever invented. Turns the kettle into a smoker. Here's the link. https://abcbarbecue.com/
  8. London Broil. I'm experimenting with different recipes for the upcoming tailgate season. I have a couple that everyone seems to like, but I want to try something differently I'm sick of shelling out big-bucks for flank-steak. It can get pretty expensive, feeding the ES tailgate crowd! BTW, my tailgate grill? A 34 year old Weber Kettle. I just leave it out, when we go into the game, and hope that it's still there when we come back out. So far, it's always there after the game. Someone did kick it over one time, probably a pissed off Iggles fan!
  9. If it didn't shred, it wasn't cooked long enough. It was probably "done" i.e. safe to eat, but in order to pull, (shred), a pork shoulder needs to be cooked at a high enough temperature to allow the collagen to melt, and the meat fibers separate. That part of the cook doesn't even begin until the internal temp exceeds 170, and at 170, it's not nearly done enough to pull. There's no "set" temp, for pulling, but it generally will do so, after it hits 190 degrees, when measured in the thickest part of the meat. The magic # for me is 203, but I've pulled them at 195. You can tell when it's ready, the bone wiggles loose. When I state loose, it should pull out with no effort at all. If it's boneless, which I don't recommend, it's done when a probe goes in like butter. There is a point in the cook, where the meat "stalls", where the temp hits a certain point, ( ~165-170 for most cuts that I do), and just stays there for hours. In a nutshell, it's at the point where the meat sweats and moisture evaporates, cooling the meat. Sometimes the temp will even go down a little. Google "the stall" for more info. Anyway, at this point, be patient, and don't worry if the temp sits there for hours. It will eventually bust through it and the temp will rise. Some people wrap a shoulder in foil, to help "muscle" through the stall. I don't bother. Next cook, make sure that you don't have too large of a shoulder. Keep it under 5lbs. Ideal, is 4lbs. If you're feeding a crowd, buy and 8 lb'er and have the butcher cut in half, and smoke 'em both at once. They'll cook faster and you'll have twice the delicious bark. Start a lot earlier than you think you need too, done early is better than waiting around for it to finish. If it's done earlier than anticipated, ( a rare occurence), wrap it tightly in foil, and toss it in a faux-cambro, (Google it), which is basically a cooler full of towels, it will keep piping hot for hours. Just make sure that it stays above the safe temp of 140 degrees. Make sure that you have an accurate, leave-in, probe thermometer, which helps immensely. Good luck, and let me know how you make out.
  10. That's a shame. I think that the Mission near us is original,(flagship?) restaurant . They even bought a closed bank branch, next door, and turned it into a big smoke house, for their catering business, I presume. When the wind is blowing in the right direction, it smells heavenly in the neighborhood. Unless we're travelling, it's hard for me to buy, because most things I make just as good, or better, for a fraction of the price. That's why we don't eat out too often and, when we do, I order food that I seldom make myself. This weekend I'm experimenting with London broil recipes, for tailgate season. Those damn flank steaks are too pricey anymore, to feed a crowd.
  11. I'm a bourbon guy but, if someone else was buying, I'd try it.
  12. I did a search, right after Howard mentioned the price. It looks like this Macallan vintage 1966. Just north of $20K. http://www.wine-searcher.com/find/the+macallan+fine+rare+single+malt+scotch+whisky+speyside+highlands+scotland/1966
  13. "double smoked?" Run!!!! We have a Mission BBQ, across the street from us. It's pretty good, but it's tough to pay for something that I make better on my own. I really like their jalapeño & cheese hot links, which I cannot make at home and, some of their seasonal sides are killer, specifically, the cream corn and bread pudding. Both of them are really, really tasty. The specials, particularly the smoked salmon was really good too.