TK

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  1. April 29, 2017 Head Coach Jay Gruden On RB Samaje Perine: "Well, there's a lot to like. He was very productive in his years at Oklahoma. He's a physical runner, without a doubt. Nobody can argue that point. We got a chance to interview him, sit down with him at the combine. He's also a leader-type player, but really when it comes down to it, he can get from here to there – physically. He's a physical runner and had a lot of production and a lot of yards. He's a great kid. I think he's got a chance to be a special team player also. He's done some of that in his career. Can't argue the production and the toughness that he has, and that's what drew us to him." On if he planned to have this kind of size in this draft class: "That's always what you're looking for. It depends on the player, but we got bigger and stronger. We also drafted some speed. Fabian [Moreau] can run 4.3 and obviously Robert [Davis] is a very fast player, so we got a couple guys that can really run." On where the defense is right now on paper following the draft: "That's what it is – it’s on paper. You feel like you're better, everybody does at this time. It's how we gel as a unit that is the important thing – how they buy into Coach Manusky's scheme and Coach Tomsula's coaching, how they work well together and how they make each other better. That's a challenge that we have. And we're going to start out here. Phase I, they've already started. We're going to get them going and introduce them to the scheme and see how they work together." On if there is a common theme in their draft selections, whether it be attitude, speed or size: "You’d like a combination of all of them, but we definitely sided towards the attitude and the size. I think Jonathan [Allen] and [Ryan] Anderson, we figured out those two guys were tough, physical football players and that's very, very important. And Fabian, obviously, for being a corner he's got some toughness to him also, but he also runs a 4.35 and he's got a combination of all of them. He's also been a captain. We've got great guys, great physical, tough guys." On the distribution of how positions were drafted: “It’s the way it worked out really. We tried to follow our board. I think Scott Campbell and Bruce [Allen] and the scouts really did a great job of getting the board set. The assistant coaches had a lot of say in it, did a very nice job. We feel like we did a good job. We’ll see how it stacks out, but getting Fabian in the third, Samaje in the fourth and obviously getting Montae [Nicholson] is a heck of a good add for us. We got some guys late that we feel really good about.” On if not selecting a quarterback is an endorsement of the current quarterbacks: “I think so. I think just because we draft a guy at your position doesn’t mean were saying you’re bad at your position. I think it’s just that those are the best players available. But we obviously feel good about Kirk [Cousins], Colt [McCoy] and Nate [Sudfeld] moving forward. If we get one as a free agent for the rookie minicamp and see how he does, well go from there. On targeting defensive backs and selecting S Montae Nicholson in the fourth round: “I think when you’re looking in the third round and you see Fabian sitting there, you had to take him. Obviously, the running back situation, we weren’t really necessarily looking for a new addition, but we couldn’t pass up on Samaje. We were happy to get him, man. We really enjoyed his interview, his toughness watching him on tape. You feel his presence when he runs the football. He’s a hard guy to get down, and if you do get him down, you’re going to get up holding your shoulder or something because he’s going to hit you. Then Montae was sitting there and it was kind of a position of need, but also he was one of our top-rated safeties and we decided to take him. He’s got an injury, but we feel like he’ll be ready for camp. He’s a big kid that can really run. I think he ran a 4.4 at the Combine, and worst-case he’s going to help out our special teams and that’s important. That’s one of the big three phases so that’s a good add for us.” On WR Robert Davis and if the team has specifically targeted larger receivers: “Well, I think when you’re looking for outside receivers, you’re looking for a guy that can be a little bit bigger. We feel like we have the best inside receiver – one of the best ones in the game – in Jamison [Crowder] so we weren’t really looking to add another one there. But we have some guys that can play a little bit of everywhere. You’d like to have size, but we just felt like at the time Robert was the best player available at receiver. He just so happened to be 6-2 and runs a 4.4. Good for us [laughter]. Really, size, we weren’t looking for a specific position there. We were looking for a guy that could run and maybe help out on special teams in his first year and continue to develop and break in the lineup that way first.” On if WR Jamison Crowder will move outside: “Well, he’ll be inside when we go three receivers, for sure. Just when we go two receivers, we’ll mix-and-match however we do it. We’re going to try to keep him on the field as much as possible.” On the nose tackle spot: “I feel good, you know? I think a lot of people don’t know the guys we’ve had here or the guys there were on our practice squad like Joey Mbu, A.J. Francis. We feel good about the development of Matt Ioannidis, those three guys. And we added Phil Taylor. He’s an ex-first-round pick, had a couple of injuries but he’s looking good out here. He looks healthy and [he is] rolling so we feel good about those four guys competing for the nose guard spot. And we added obviously Stacy [McGee] who has played a little bit of nose but he’s more of an end, but we’ve got some multi-dimensional guys.” On if he feels like he got the blocking tight end he was looking for in Jeremy Sprinkle: “Yes, we do. He’s a big guy that can do both. That’s very exciting. That’s very rare nowadays in college football. A lot of tight ends are athletic, can run, but when you ask them to put their hand on the ground and block that six-technique, it’s a whole different ballgame. We feel like Jeremy [Sprinkle] can do a little bit of both. And he’s still got to develop his upper body, but I think we get him in our building, get him in the weight room… He’s got the length, he’s got the size, he’s got the toughness. I think he’s a good pick.” On the coaches’ input and workload during the draft this year compared to last year: “It was about the same. Same, same. Everybody is responsible to grade their players at their position. Gave the input and did a great job.” On what he liked about C Chase Roullier: “He’s a tough guy, man. You know, he’s played center, he’s played guard. And when you’re looking to draft a guy in the later rounds, the sixth round when we got him... He was a target for us because of his ability to play guard and center. You like to have a guy come in here and compete for the backup job behind Spencer [Long], but also if somebody gets injured in front of you, you’ve got to be able to play left guard and right guard. We feel like he can do that.” On how the draft room operated: “It was great. Very smooth. No issues whatsoever. You know, we had our share of back-and-forth conversation. You know, you’ve got a lot of guys [with] same grades, and some guys, positions want this guy, we want that guy, but it was a smooth process led by Bruce [Allen] and Scott Campbell. They did a great job, and obviously all the area scouts were tremendous.” On how involved he is in contract discussions with QB Kirk Cousins: “I’m not involved in the contract negotiating at all. No, that’s not my cup of tea, nor do I want it to be. I just try to say ‘We want you,’ and ‘Please sign.’” On S Josh Harvey-Clemons: “Josh is an interesting guy. He’s played some safety, but he’s 6-foot-4 and can run. He’s a tough guy, he’s played in the box a little bit. We’re going to try him at dime linebacker, and see and go from there. But, you know, you look around the league and you look at some of these running backs that are getting drafted, you know [Alvin] Kamara and some of these smaller scatbacks that are really good receivers, you better have somebody that can run and cover them and also be able to tackle if they run inside zone or something like that. We feel like he can do that. [It will] be a good project, and height/weight/speed, he fits all the measurables, we’ve just got to find a spot for him.” On what position Josh Holsey will play: “We see him competing at nickel and a little bit at corner. He played very well. He competed against Mike Williams and did a great job. I love his competitiveness. You look as his measurables and he’s not the biggest guy in the world, but he competes as good as any corner we’ve seen out there. We’re excited to throw him in the mix and let him compete at nickel/corner and special teams obviously.” On how he feels about the defensive line after drafting Jonathan Allen: “Like I said, it’s just how the draft board went. Once you get a player like that to add to the room… We feel good about the guys we’ve mentioned before, obviously [Terrell] McClain and [Stacy] McGee. Then we’ve talked a lot about Anthony Lanier who we feel good about, Ziggy Hood is coming back. We feel like we have a good combination there at defensive line. We could add maybe one or two more as a college free agent that are still out there – there’s some good players still left out there. So far, so good. We feel like we’ve addressed it with three big signings – Ziggy was a free agent, so really four – to go along with Matt [Ioannidis] and Anthony, and then the guys that we had on our practice squad with [Joey] Mbu and A.J. Francis and obviously Phil Taylor. So we feel good about it.” On what adding another running back means for RB Matt Jones: “He’s here just like everybody. I’ve mentioned it before, you sign a guy, it doesn’t mean the end of the world for a somebody who was his backup or what have you last year. Everybody has to come in here and compete. Anybody who knows me and the way we’ve done business here in the past, we play the best player. We don’t play the politically correct player, we will play the player who performs the best, and everybody is going to get a chance.” On if there was a single performance by Perine that attracted the team to him: “Kansas his junior year was pretty good – 427 yards, I think [laughter]. That’s not easy to do. But I just think his body of work, really. Playing with a great back like Joe [Mixon] over there, to really take advantage of the carries… I think he’s averaged six-point-something yards per carry. You say, ‘Oh, he’s a big back, he’s a between-the-tackles back.’ He’s averaging six yards per carry, so he’s a little bit more than that. I don’t think he gets enough credit for once he gets outside that ability to run over people, stiff-arm people [and] still make people miss. Not to mention, the character on this kid is A-plus. We know we’re going to get the most out of him. He benched 30 times on 225 [pounds], so we know how strong he is. Just a total package is really what we liked.” Introductory Press Conference: DL Jonathan Allen and LB Ryan Anderson Opening statements: ALLEN: “For me, I would just like to thank the Washington Redskin organization for making this dream come true. This is truly a blessing for me, not only to play for the NFL, but to be on the team I grew up watching. This is just a great and tremendous honor. It’s just been a lot of hard work to this point in my life, but I would just like to say thank you. I’m excited and looking forward to going out there and getting my NFL career started with this great locker room. From the guys I met, I’m very excited.” ANDERSON: “I’ll just kind of build on what he said. Thank you to all those GMs, coaches and everybody that believed in me and bringing me in. I’m excited to be a Redskin and to get this process started, meet some of my teammates and get this ball rolling.” On Redskins that were role models to Allen: ALLEN: “As far as role models, Chris Cooley was a guy who I’ve always kind of had a relationship with, so he’s definitely been a big help to me through this process. If I had to choose one, I would definitely say Chris Cooley. He’s just a great role model, a great leader, been a great mentor to me. He’s been tremendous for me.” On their relationship together at Alabama: ANDERSON: “We [were] pretty close. We talked a lot. We played on the same defense for years, man. We were close. But never ever in a million years I thought we would be on the same team. I thought I got rid of him [laughter].” ALLEN: “Kind of to repeat back what Ryan said, playing on the same defense for the last four years, [we] definitely came close. We definitely have a great brotherhood at Alabama. You never think about a situation where you go to play for a team with one of your great friends from college. It’s a blessing, I’m excited.” On their dynamic on the field together at Alabama: ANDERSON: “Like I said, we had a great relationship. We got to the point where we can work together, we can go out there and we call a lot of games and stuff on our own – that came with trust and time. For us to be on the same team, we can just pick right back up where we left off. I know him and I know his skill set. I know when he’s hot, I’m going to cover him, and if I’m rushing good, he can cover me. We pretty much have got that understanding. Like I said, man, it’s a great feeling to have another dog, somebody that’s going to go out there and lay it out there with you every day. That’s good, too.” ALLEN: “Kind of what he said, just the mentality that we have coming out of Alabama, I feel like we’re very special. To know that I have a guy with me from Alabama is cool. We kind of fuel off of each other [and] feed off of each other just by our playing styles and how we go about doing it the right way. I’m excited. I’m excited to get things started, and having an Alabama guy with me makes it even better.” On how they would describe each other as players and teammates: ANDERSON: "Jonathan is a great teammate, you know what I mean? He’s a guy, he can come in the locker room and change the mood of a lot of guys. He has got that ability. He can joke around, but when it’s time to get serious and get on the field, he's all about his business. He's a smart player and great player… That’s pretty much it." ALLEN: "For me, Ryan is a very versatile player. He's dominant on the run, aggressive, physical, and nasty. For me, those are things I'm kind of looking for when I'm looking for.” ANDERSON: “Oh, that’s killing him [laughter]. That’s killing him right now.” ALLEN: “Those are the kinds of things I’m looking for in a linebacker. And as far as a teammate, he's probably one of the best I've had just from the work ethic standpoint. It’s not really too many times you would catch Ryan slacking off, he's usually bringing guys to his level. As a teammate, and as a person, you can't really ask for too much better." ANDERSON: “I’m glad you asked that question. He would have never said that stuff about me.” On Anderson’s inspiration and from where his attitude comes: ANDERSON: "Those people sitting right there – my mom, my sister and my brother. I always go out there and I'm playing for them. I'm playing for something bigger than me. It ain’t all about me. I don't feel like I can play this game at the level that I play it at and where I came from playing it if it was just about me." On the last 24 hours: ALLEN: "For me, it’s been a lot. I’ve probably experienced every emotional thing that you can, but probably the biggest thing is being excited. Yesterday, I was just so excited just to come in and meet all the coaches and Mr. Snyder. It’s been amazing. My mom said today, it's just back to the process. I'm looking forward to playing here, but I'm most excited to just get to work, get to running, get to working out with the team and just trying to catch up to speed with the rest of the guys. Just getting back to business." On the draft process: ANDERSON: “For me, like you said, we had a long season. Coming out of that season, the long season, the way we played, the way we practice at Bama is physically and mentally… it will wear you down. We had to play catch up on this training stuff, a lot of the combine stuff, it was tough. Guys had been done playing in November and December, really early and were training, so that was the tough part for me. It was non-stop and didn’t really get a break. We are jumping right back into it now, but I’m glad that part is over with and it’s back to football now… “I got advice from a lot of players, that played and went through it and they said the same thing. Just try to enjoy it. You only have got to do it one time, but I really wasn’t hearing that. I really didn’t like the draft process that much.” ALLEN: “For me, I would probably say the waiting. It was a long season. It was physically and mentally exhausting, but this is my job. This is what I love to do. So, for me, it was just the waiting part, doing things that weren’t necessarily football-related. For me, getting back to football is what I have been waiting for since January 11th. So that’s what I’m most looking forward to.” On what it means for Allen to play for the Redskins: ALLEN: “To play for the Redskins means a lot. I still remember the days when I would come up to the Redskins’ facility when we first got Donovan McNabb and I was out there for training camp and watching them. So it’s cool to be able to say I can play for the Redskins. But that was then and this is now. This is my job and this is my business. It’s so exciting and it’s fun, but I’m just ready to get to work. For my family, they are so excited. Right in the backyard. It’s something you only hear about in stories. Not really something we even thought could happen, so now that it happened is really just a blessing and a dream come true.” On why they chose to play collegiately at Alabama: ALLEN: “Well, I was born in Anniston, Alabama, so I’ve always grown up an Alabama fan. For me when you have Coach [Nick] Saban sitting on your couch in your living room telling you he wants you to play for him, I mean, that’s not really something you say no to.” ANDERSON: “I wanted to roll with the Tide, big guy.” On if Allen has a preference where he plays on the defensive line: ALLEN: “No, I mean, I don’t have a preference. As a football player I just want to be out there. That’s the most important thing for me. So, where ever the coaches tell me to play at that’s where I’m going to go play at and do it effectively.” On if Allen had been to FedExField before today: ALLEN: “So I’ve never actually been to a game. I went to the Barcelona/Manchester United game in 2010, I think, but besides that this is my first time. So walking in was an amazing experience. Like Ryan kind of said, just trying to soak it all in. You know it doesn’t even seem real at this point.” On what they expect to feel walking into the stadium to play their first NFL game: ALLEN: “I’m going to be excited, but I don’t really know how I’m going to feel. Probably going to be locked in and focused because it’s going to be my first NFL game. I have a job to do. This is a business. So I’m probably going to be just super mentally locked in and focused and ready to play football.” ANDERSON: “I don’t feel like it’ll be any different from my first time walking into Bryant-Denny [Stadium in Tuscaloosa]. It’s just a different level, different team. High level competition, but at the end of the day it’s all the same game. It’s all the same feeling. Going in there for one reason.” On if Anderson could play inside linebacker: ANDERSON: “They haven’t talked to me about it.” On if Anderson would be against playing inside linebacker: ANDERSON: “No, I wouldn’t be against it. This is my job now. I ain’t in college no more. I ain’t doing this for free, so [laughter].” RB Samaje Perine On getting the call from the Redskins: “I was just patiently waiting. I didn’t know when my name was going to be called, but once it finally got called [unintelligible]… I just can’t wait to get started.” On his pre-draft interaction with the Redskins: “Not much. I talked with them at the Combine, but after that I didn’t really have much contact with them.” On his running style: “Definitely a downhill runner. I’ve been working on making people miss throughout this whole process, so I’ve gotten better at that. I’d much prefer to go through you than around you.” On what he has been working on to make defenders miss: “Just some basic agility drills. Working with bags and working with cones – just making moves on those bags and cones and having a coach standing at the end and making a move on me really quick. Just simple stuff.” On why he wants to improve that aspect of his game: “Just to improve my game. I know that I haven’t really been able to show that as much, so I knew teams were going to have some questions about that. I just wanted to work on it and get ahead of the ball.” On who called him from the Redskins: “I got a call from the owner of the team. And then I talked to several coaches, talked to the running back coach, talked to the head coach. Then went on from there – kind of a round robin of phone calls.” On sharing carries at Oklahoma: “I just kept my head down and continued to work hard. You know, I know nothing is going to be given to me. Never will, never has been, so that’s all I can do is work and when my name gets called just make the most of it.” On how he would describe himself as a pass catcher and pass protector: “Don’t really have much game film of pass catching, but that was something I also worked on throughout this process. And you know my hands have gotten a lot better, route running has gotten a lot better. Pass pro has always been something that I’ve prided myself on starting from high school and continuing that process through college. So I feel like my pass pro is pretty good. You can always get better at stuff but coming out, as a starting point, I feel like my pass pro is pretty good.” On the origin of the name Samaje: “I’ve gotten that question a lot. My mom, she’s always said that she wanted a variation of Sam because my granddad’s name is Sam and then I have a couple of Sams in the family, so she wanted a variation of Sam. But she didn’t want Sam, that specific, so she just put a twist on it and came up with Samaje.” S Montae Nicholson On his expectations: "Like any player, I expect to come in, play and help the team in any way and go get a Super Bowl. That's what it’s all about, that's the highest achievement. [I want] just to be an impact on the team any way I can." On when he'll be able to return from his injury: "Fall camp, that's when Dr. Bradley and my physical therapist tell me I'll be ready to go. They said I'm ahead of schedule and said it’s looking good. So I'm just excited to just keep doing rehab, get down there and start getting to work." On how he would describe himself and his best traits: "I'm a physical player, you know what I mean? I like to run and hit people. I'm pretty fast, and I have got good range. That’s pretty much attributes for the team." On areas in which he can improve: “Studying the game, because when my body goes, it’s all mental. Once I get down there, I’m going to dive right into the playbook as soon as possible, learn all the plays just because I won’t be able to do anything right away. So, I just want to get everything in my head just so I don’t lose a step.” On the decision to enter the draft: “It was definitely a tough decision, probably one of the toughest decisions – if not the toughest decision – I’ve had to make to this point in my life. I talked it over with my mom, my grandfather. I call them my panel, so to speak. I sat down for weeks trying to decide what was best for me. In the end, I decided out to come out and that it was best for me and my family. I don’t regret it at all. I’m very excited to get to work.” On if he is having a draft party: “Right now, no. It’s just me and my little sister at the house. My little brother had a tournament. My little sister is having her own party right now. She’s giving me a big hug right now. I’m going to get together with some family later and celebrate that way.” TE Jeremy Sprinkle On the moment of being drafted: “It was pretty exciting. This has always been a big dream for me. To finally have it come true, it’s a big moment for me right now.” On his blocking ability: “I would say it’s definitely the most improved part of my game over my career as far as developing as a tight end. I feel like this past season, just being able to be in those gap schemes and everything like that, it really gave me an opportunity to show that my in-line blocking is really good. I feel like that part of my game is good and solid.” On his experience playing special teams: “As my role got bigger on offense, I did special teams less, but for the first three years that I played, I was on punt, punt return, kickoff, and kickoff return, as well as hands and onside. I played all of special teams for three years, except for the last year that I was the full-time starter.” On what he learned from bowl week last year: "I feel like it was a big disappointment for everyone around me. Obviously it was something that was out of my character. I just learned that, you know, you just have to be the same person whether you think someone's watching or not. And, you know, just moving past it, I've done everything I've needed to do as far as the legal process of getting that over with, having the charges dropped and, you know, just trying to move past it." On if he had any pre-draft communication with the Redskins: "You know, mostly just interviews, as you know with the Senior Bowl and the combine. As far as the weeks leading up, I haven't really had much contact, so I mean, it’s a big surprise, and, you know, I really love it." C Chase Roullier On getting the call from the Redskins: “It’s a long wait after three days. It definitely starts to get long, but it was a very exciting call and I’m very excited to be a Washington Redskin.” On his strengths and weaknesses: “I think one of my biggest strengths is my consistency in my play. I pride myself on being a pretty intelligent guy coming from an engineering background [and] that really translates well onto the field. I’m able to think on my feet pretty quickly. My play stays very consistently throughout the game at that level. There’s obviously always things that you need to work on as an offensive lineman, but just getting my feet in the ground and placing my hands in the right position are just a couple of those little things.” On the adjustment of moving from guard to center: “I made the adjustment for my team this past year with the [Wyoming] Cowboys. It was a move that we needed to make as an offensive line just due to the best situation for the offense. I was more than willing to do that, and I think it really, honestly helped me out a lot. Just being able to prove that I have that versatility being able to play both guard and center really helped me out just to prove that I could do it. I was the backup center throughout my years as a guard at Wyoming, but being able to actually go in there and play center helped a lot.” On for which position he is best suited in the NFL: “I think I’ll do very well at center. Being up there in front of the rest of the offensive line, being able to see that defense and really play to my strengths of being able to see the defense and read things I think will really help me a lot in the NFL.” On his engineering background: “I enjoyed getting a degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Wyoming. It was a tough load, definitely during the season and being a Division I football player and doing a mechanical engineering degree at the exact same time, it’s a difficult task for sure. But, you know, I managed and got a good degree out of it.” On Offensive Line Coach Bill Callahan: “I had the chance to meet Coach Callahan. I came into Washington for a visit a couple of weeks ago. Coach Callahan seems like he’s a great coach to play under. He’s a great guy, obviously has a tremendous amount of knowledge for the game and I’m very excited to play under him.” WR Robert Davis On what it was like getting the call: "It was excellent, man. I was sitting here all day waiting to see where I was going to get drafted at and I'm just blessed to join an organization like the Redskins." On what makes him stand out as a player: "Just athleticism. I'm an athletic receiver that can help stretch the field. I really feel I can come into that organization with the great receiver coach they have there. I'm just ready to go to work and see what I can do to help the team." On who helped him through the pre-draft process: “My cousin, Thomas Davis, who plays for the Carolina Panthers – linebacker. He’s been the guy who’s been in my corner the whole time. He’s been letting me know all the ins and outs of what’s going on. He’s just been the guy who’s kept me motivated and always been there to tell me right from wrong.” On his ability to contribute in the running game or on special teams: “All I can say is I’m a football player. I don’t even consider myself as just a wide receiver. I consider myself a football player. I feel like I can go out there and make plays on special teams. I’m willing to block. I went to a triple option high school, where that was the only thing we did. I only caught eight passes my high school career. I mean, blocking was what I did, and I am a skilled blocker. I’m a physical guy and I’m a guy who’s willing to go out there and compete.” S Josh Harvey-Clemons On getting drafted by the Washington Redskins: “Oh man. I can’t even describe it, man. I was sitting here worried because it was getting later, and later in the seventh round. It was a big relief.” On his strengths and some areas of improvement: “I think my strengths are my range and my length and my ability to get to the ball. Some things I need to work on… I would say just small footwork things and staying low out of my break and things like that.” On potentially playing dime linebacker: “I’m willing to play anywhere. I played multiple positions at my former school, Louisville. I hope to do the same.” On his experience playing special teams: “I played special teams all of my years except for my last year of college. I’ve played on every special team.” CB Joshua Holsey On getting the call from the Washington Redskins: “It was a dream come true, one of those things you’ve been waiting for a long time. So to just get that call finally was real big.” On his strengths and areas of improvement: “[My] strengths, I’m just a really smart, intelligent football player. I play ball through the wall every play. I try to go as hard as I can. I watch a lot of film [and] I do the little things that matter at the end. I just want to work on being a pro. Doing what it takes to stay in the league as long as possible. Just learn from those veteran guys who have been there and just get better each and every day.” On his injury history and if it affected him as a player: “Big time, you know what I mean, but I was able to bounce back from that. A lot of guys can’t come back from two ACL injuries and play as well I did. I was able to battle through those. Injuries happen, so you have to be able to fight through and come back. I feel like I did that and Washington and Coach [Torrian] Gray and Coach [Jay] Gruden felt that as well and took a chance for me.” On playing special teams: “I played on all the special teams.”
  2. For Immediate Release April 29, 2017 REDSKINS SELECT 10 PLAYERS IN 2017 NFL DRAFT LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The Washington Redskins finalized their 2017 NFL Draft class on Saturday, selecting seven players to bring their 2017 draft class to 10 total players. The team’s 2017 draft class is as follows: ROUND (PICK) PLAYER SCHOOL 1 (17) DL Jonathan Allen Alabama 2 (49) LB Ryan Anderson Alabama 3 (81) DB Fabian Moreau UCLA 4 (114) 1 RB Samaje Perine Oklahoma 4 (123) DB Montae Nicholson Michigan State 5 (154) 2 TE Jeremy Sprinkle Arkansas 6 (199) 3 C Chase Roullier Wyoming 6 (209) 4 WR Robert Davis Georgia State 7 (230) 5 S Josh Harvey-Clemons Louisville 7 (235) DB Joshua Holsey Auburn 1 From New York Jets 2 From New Orleans 3 From Minnesota 4 From Houston 5 From Philadelphia through Minnesota NOTES ON THE REDSKINS’ OVERALL DRAFT · The Redskins made 10 selections for the second time in the past three drafts (10 in 2015). It marks the first time the team has made at least 10 selections twice in a three-year span since 1990 and 1992, when the draft contained 12 rounds. · Dating back to 2011, the Redskins have now selected at least seven players in seven consecutive drafts for the first time since the league adopted the seven-round format in 1994. · The Redskins made seven selections on Day 3, marking the fourth time (nine in 2011, seven in 2012, seven in 2015) the team has selected seven players on Day 3 of the draft since the NFL moved to the three-day format in 2010. · The Redskins made one trade during the draft, sending the Nos. 201 and 220 overall selections to the Minnesota Vikings for the Nos. 199 and 230 overall selections. · The Redskins selected five players with picks acquired via trade, including three selections with picks acquired during the 2016 NFL Draft (RB Samaje Perine, TE Jeremy Sprinkle and WR Robert Davis) and two acquired in Saturday’s trade with Minnesota (C Chase Roullier and S Josh Harvey-Clemons. · The Redskins have selected at least four players with picks acquired via trade in each of the last four drafts. · The Redskins selected a defensive player in each of the first four rounds of the draft for the first time in the Common Draft era (since 1967). · The Redskins selected six defensive players in total, the team’s most in a single draft since 2011 (six). · The Redskins selected four defensive backs, the team’s most in a single draft since 1987 (Brian Davis, Steve Gage, Johnny Thomas and Clarence Vaughn). · By drafting defensive players with each of their first three selections, the Redskins did not make an offensive selection in the first 100 picks for the first time since 2009 and the fourth time since the turn of the century (2006, 2007, 2009). · The Redskins made multiple selections in the fourth, sixth and seventh rounds. It marked the first time the team has selected multiple players in three different rounds since 2012 (two each in the fourth, sixth and seventh rounds). · The Redskins have now selected at least one pair of college teammates in four of the last seven drafts (Nebraska’s Roy Helu Jr., DeJon Gomes and Niles Paul in 2011; SMU’s Josh LeRibeus and Richard Crawford in 2012; Florida State’s Chris Thompson and Brandon Jenkins in 2013; Arkansas’ Martrell Spaight and Tevin Mitchel in 2015). · The 2017 draft marks the fifth time the Redskins have selected a pair of teammates out of Alabama (1941, 1948, 1951, 1962). · All 10 of the Redskins’ draft picks played their collegiate careers in the Football Bowl Subdivision, marking the fifth straight year the team’s entire draft class had played at the FBS level. The last Redskins draft pick to play in the Football Championship Subdivision was South Dakota’s Tom Compton (2012). · The Redskins selected four players from the Southeastern Conference and one each from the Pac-12, Big 12, Big Ten, Mountain West, Sun Belt and Atlantic Coast Conferences. Ten of the Redskins’ 27 selections in the last three drafts (2015-17) have come from SEC schools. NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF JONATHAN ALLEN · Allen is the 456th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 28th first-round selection in that time frame. He is the 59th first-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Allen’s selection snaps a two-year streak of the Redskins selecting an offensive player with their first selection in the NFL Draft (Brandon Scherff in 2015 and Josh Doctson in 2016). He is the first defensive player to be the first selection of the Redskins in a draft since the team chose Trent Murphy with their first selection (a second-round pick) of the 2014 NFL Draft. · Allen is the first defensive player selected by the Redskins in the first round since the team drafted two-time Pro Bowl linebacker Ryan Kerrigan in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft. · Allen’s selection marks the first time the Redskins have selected a defensive lineman with their first selection in a draft since 2009 when the team selected defensive-end-turned-linebacker Brian Orakpo in the first round. The last time the Redskins selected a player that remained along the defensive line with their first selection in a draft was in 1997, when the team selected DE Kenard Lang, coincidentally also with the No. 17 overall pick. · Allen becomes the third Bronko Nagurski Award winner (awarded annually by the Football Writers Association of America to the best defensive player in the nation) selected by the Redskins since the award’s inception in 1993, joining Orakpo (2009 NFL Draft) and Champ Bailey (1999 NFL Draft). · Allen is the second Chuck Bednarik Award winner (awarded by the Maxwell Football Club to the best defensive player in America) drafted by the Redskins all-time since the award’s inception in 1995, joining LB LaVar Arrington (2000 NFL Draft). · Allen is the second Ted Hendricks Award winner (awarded by the Ted Hendricks Foundation to college football’s top defensive end) drafted by the Redskins since the award’s inception in 2002, joining Orakpo (2009 NFL Draft). (Note: 2013 Ted Hendricks Award winner Jackson Jeffcoat also spent part of the 2014-15 seasons with the Redskins after entering the league as an undrafted free agent with the Seattle Seahawks) · Allen becomes the first Alabama product selected by the Redskins in the first round since the team chose six-time Pro Bowl tackle Chris Samuels with the No. 3 overall pick in the 2000 NFL Draft. Allen is now the fourth Alabama product selected by the Redskins in the first round all-time, joining Samuels, B Riley Smith (1936), B Harry Gilmer (1948) and B Lowell Tew (1948). · Allen is the 22nd player from the University of Alabama selected by the Redskins all-time, joining B Riley Smith (1936), B Charley Holm (1939), E Sandy Sanford (1940), T Fred Davis (1941), G Ed Hickerson (1941), G Tony Leon (1943), B Bobby Jenkins (1945), T Fay Mills (1946), B Harry Gilmer (1948), B Lowell Tew (1948), T Dick Flowers (1949), E Ed White (1950), B Eddie Salem (1951), C Elliot Speed (1951), B Billy Hicks (1956), T Billy Neighbors (1962), E Tommy Brooker (1962), DB Steve Higginbotham (1972), DT Thomas Rayam (1990), T Chris Samuels (2000) and G Arie Kouandjio (2015). · With Allen’s selection, Alabama broke a tie with Penn State (21) for the third-most all-time draft selections from any single school in franchise history. The Crimson Tide now trail only Notre Dame (34) and USC (30) in Redskins draft history. · Allen becomes the first Southeastern Conference product selected by the Redskins in the first round since selecting LSU’s LaRon Landry with the sixth overall pick in the 2007 NFL Draft. · Allen becomes the fifth player selected by the Redskins all-time with the No. 17 overall pick, joining B Red Knight (1947), DT Bobby Wilson (1991), DB Tom Carter (1993) and DE Kenard Lang (1997). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF RYAN ANDERSON · Anderson is the 457th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 37th second-round selection in that time frame. He is the 55th second-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · With Anderson’s selection, the Redskins have now selected a defensive player with each of their last six second-round picks (DL Jarvis Jenkins, 2011; CB David Amerson, 2013; LB Trent Murphy, 2014; LB Preston Smith, 2015; S Su’a Cravens, 2016). It marks the team’s longest such streak in the Common Draft era. · With Anderson’s selection, the Redskins have now selected a linebacker in the second round in four consecutive drafts (Trent Murphy in 2014, Preston Smith in 2015, Su’a Cravens – who played predominantly at linebacker as a rookie – in 2016). · Including the selection of Alabama’s Jonathan Allen with the team’s first-round pick, the Redskins have now selected players from the same school with the first two selections of a draft since selecting Auburn’s Jason Campbell and Carlos Rogers with the team’s first two picks of the 2005 NFL Draft. · By selecting Allen (10.5 sacks in 2016) and Anderson (9.0), the Redskins have now drafted players that accounted for more than a third of Alabama’s Football Bowl Subdivision-leading 54.0 sacks last season. · Anderson is the 23rd player from the University of Alabama selected by the Redskins all-time, joining B Riley Smith (1936), B Charley Holm (1939), E Sandy Sanford (1940), T Fred Davis (1941), G Ed Hickerson (1941), G Tony Leon (1943), B Bobby Jenkins (1945), T Fay Mills (1946), B Harry Gilmer (1948), B Lowell Tew (1948), T Dick Flowers (1949), E Ed White (1950), B Eddie Salem (1951), C Elliot Speed (1951), B Billy Hicks (1956), T Billy Neighbors (1962), E Tommy Brooker (1962), DB Steve Higginbotham (1972), DT Thomas Rayam (1990), T Chris Samuels (2000), G Arie Kouandjio (2015) and DL Jonathan Allen (2017). · The Redskins have now selected members of the defensive front seven in each of the first two rounds of the draft for the first time since 2011 (LB Ryan Kerrigan and DL Jarvis Jenkins). · Anderson is the fifth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 49 overall pick all-time, joining E Elmer Dohrmann (1938), B Walt Trojanowski (1946), T Bob Wetoska (1959) and DB Vernon Dean (1982). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF FABIAN MOREAU · Moreau is the 458th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 34th third-round selection in that time frame. He is the 64th third-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · With Moreau’s selection, the Redskins have now selected a defensive player with their first three picks of the draft for the first time since 2009 (DE/LB Brian Orakpo in the first round, CB Kevin Barnes in the third round and LB Cody Glenn in the fifth round). Prior to 2017, the last time the Redskins selected a defensive player in each of the first, second and third rounds was in 1997 when the team picked DE Kenard Lang, LB Greg Jones and LB Derek Smith, respectively. · Moreau’s selection marks the second straight season in which the Redskins have selected a defensive back with their third-round pick (Kendall Fuller, 2016). · Moreau is the Redskins’ 15th selection of a player from UCLA all-time, joining E Dave Brown (1944), B Cal Rossi (1946 and 1947), E Roy Karrasch (1947), E Bill Clements (1949), B Joe Marvin (1952), T Gil Moreno (1956), C Art Kuehn (1975), QB Jay Schroeder (1984), RB Skip Hicks (1998), LS Jeff Grau (2002), FB Manuel White (2005), S Chris Horton (2008) and WR Terrence Austin (2010). · Moreau is the fifth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 81 overall selection all-time, joining T Wally Merz (1957), E Jim Kenney (1959), G Derrick Dockery (2003) and TE Chris Cooley (2004). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF SAMAJE PERINE · Perine is the 459th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 32nd fourth-round selection in that time frame. He is the 47th fourth-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Perine’s selection snapped a streak of three consecutive defensive selections by the Redskins to open the 2017 Draft. His selection with the No. 114 overall pick marks the latest the Redskins have selected their first offensive player in a draft since the 2009 NFL Draft when the Redskins first offensive selection came with the No. 221 overall pick (FB Eddie Williams). · Perine is the first player from Oklahoma selected by the Redskins since the team drafted five-time Pro Bowl tackle Trent Williams with the fourth overall pick in the 2010 NFL Draft. · Perine is the 13th player from the University of Oklahoma selected by the Redskins all-time, joining C Ed Parks (1938), B Bob Seymour (1940), B Marvin Whited (1942), C Ray Pearcy (1948), B George Thomas (1950), B Leon Heath (1951), B Merrill Green (1954), T Roger Nelson (1954), DT Bob Slater (1984), TE Stephen Alexander (1998), WR Malcolm Kelly (2008) and T Trent Williams (2010). · Perine is the fourth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 114 selection all-time, joining T Ben Preston (1958), DB Bill Kishman (1969) and DT Manny Sistrunk (1970). · Perine is the first running back selected by the Redskins in the first four rounds to have played in the Big 12 Conference since drafting Nebraska’s Roy Helu Jr. in the fourth round of the 2011 NFL Draft. · The Redskins have now selected at least one running back in each of the last seven drafts, dating back to 2011. It is the team’s longest such streak since taking at least one running back in nine consecutive drafts from 1983-91. NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF MONTAE NICHOLSON · Nicholson is the 460th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 33rd fourth-round selection in that time frame. He is the 48th fourth-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · With Nicholson’s selection, the Redskins have now selected a defensive player in each of the first four rounds of the draft for the first time in the Common Draft era. · Nicholson is the first player from Michigan State selected by the Redskins since the team chose quarterback Kirk Cousins – also in the fourth round – in the 2012 NFL Draft. · Nicholson is the 17th player from Michigan State selected by the Redskins all-time, joining E Stan McRae (1941), E Frank Brogger (1945), B Al Dorow (1952), E Orlando Mazza (1952), E Paul Dekker (1953), B Ed Timmerman (1953), B Billy Wells (1954), B Gary Lowe (1956), B Jerry Planutis (1956), G Buck Nystrom (1956), FB Ron Hatcher (1962), B Carl Charon (1962), B Lonnie Sanders (1963), DT Bobby Wilson (1991), WR Devin Thomas (2008) and QB Kirk Cousins (2012). · Nicholson is the third player selected by the Redskins with the No. 123 selection all-time, joining QB Eddie LeBaron (1950) and B Alex Webster (1953). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF JEREMY SPRINKLE · Sprinkle is the 461st selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 48th fifth-round selection in that time frame. He is the 73rd fifth-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Sprinkle is the first Southeastern Conference tight end selected by the Redskins since the team chose Florida’s Jordan Reed in the third round of the 2013 NFL Draft. · Sprinkle is the 14th player from the University of Arkansas selected by the Redskins all-time, joining C Earl Wheeler (1947), B Ross Pritchard (1949), B Alvin Duke (1950), G Buddy Brown (1951), B A.J. Baker (1955), G John Childress (1962), G Dave Adams (1963), B Gordon Guest (1964), LB Jeff Goff (1982), LB Ravin Caldwell (1986), K Zach Hocker (2014), LB Martrell Spaight (2015) and CB Tevin Mitchel (2015). · After a nearly three-decade gap between selections from Arkansas from 1986 to 2014, with Sprinkle’s selection, the Redskins have now chosen four Razorbacks across the last four drafts. · Sprinkle – Arkansas’ record-holder for career touchdowns by a tight end (11) – is the second Arkansas tight end to be selected in NFL Draft history, joining the Los Angeles Chargers’ Hunter Henry (2016 second-round pick). · Sprinkle is the fourth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 154 overall selection all-time, joining WR Darnerien McCants (2001), LB Robert McCune (2005) and RB Chris Thompson (2013). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF CHASE ROULLIER · Roullier is the 462nd selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 55th sixth-round selection in that time frame. He is the 81st sixth-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Roullier is the third player from the University of Wyoming selected by the Redskins all-time, joining B Dick Campbell (1951) and C Frank Radella (1955). · Roullier’s selection snaps a six-decade span in which the Redskins did not select a player from Wyoming. · Roullier is the sixth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 199 overall selection all-time, joining T John Pehar (1946), B Jim Hefti (1947), B Gill Bocetti (1952), E Bob Johnson (1961) and T Dick Evers (1964). · With Roullier’s selection, the Redskins have drafted at least one offensive lineman in seven of the last eight drafts dating back to 2010. · Roullier is the first player selected by the Redskins with a selection acquired in a trade from Minnesota since the team used a pick from the Vikings to select Alfred Morris in the sixth round of the 2012 NFL Draft. NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF ROBERT DAVIS · Davis is the 463rd selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 56th sixth-round selection in that time frame. He is the 82nd sixth-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · With Davis’ selection, the Redskins have now selected at least one wide receiver in each of the last four drafts (Ryan Grant in 2014, Jamison Crowder and Evan Spencer in 2015, Josh Doctson in 2016). This marks the Redskins’ longest such streak since a four-year span across the 2008-11 drafts. · Davis is the first player from Georgia State selected by the Redskins all-time. It marks the first time the Redskins have selected a player from a school not represented in the team’s previous draft history since making Alfred Morris the Redskins’ first selection from Florida Atlantic in team history in the 2012 NFL Draft. · Davis is only the second player in Georgia State history to be selected in the NFL Draft, joining offensive lineman John Ulrick (Indianapolis, 2014). · Davis is the third player selected by the Redskins with the No. 209 overall selection all-time, joining B Roger Robinson (1946) and QB Joe Kapp (1959). · Davis was selected with a pick acquired from the Houston Texans via trade during the first round of the 2016 NFL Draft. The other pick acquired by the Redskins in the deal was also used to select a wide receiver – TCU’s Josh Doctson – with the No. 22 overall pick in 2016. NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF JOSH HARVEY-CLEMONS · Harvey-Clemons is the 464th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 60th seventh-round selection in that time frame. He is the 91st seventh-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Harvey-Clemons is the fourth Louisville player selected by the Redskins all-time, joining T Ron Petty (1961), TE Jamie Asher (1995) and LB Robert McCune (2005). · Harvey-Clemons is the first Louisville product selected by the Redskins during the tenure of Head Coach Jay Gruden, who played collegiately at Louisville. · Harvey-Clemons is the sixth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 230 overall selection all-time, joining B Charlie Yancey (1943), E Gary Hart (1965), DB Frank Liberatore (1968), LS Jeff Grau (2002) and OL Kili Lefotu (2006). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF JOSHUA HOLSEY · Holsey is the 465th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 61st seventh-round selection in that time frame. He is the 92nd seventh-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Holsey is the 14th Auburn player selected by the Redskins all-time, joining E Joel Eaves (1937), T Bo Russell (1939), B Rufus Deal (1942), B Curt Kuykendall (1945), C Jim Bradshaw (1945), E Jim Pyburn (1956), T Ben Preston (1958), B Bobby Lauder (1959), T Joe Baughan (1963), DT Tracy Rocker (1989), RB Stephen Davis (1996), CB Carlos Rogers (2005) and QB Jason Campbell (2005). · Holsey is the third player selected by the Redskins with the No. 235 overall selection all-time, joining C Roger Kinson (1952) and HB Hal Wantland (1966). · Holsey was the second defensive back selected by the Redskins in the seventh round in 2017. It marks the first time the Redskins have taken two members of the secondary in the final round since the league adopted the seven-round format in 1994. PRONUNCIATION GUIDE (via college media guides) SAMAJE PERINE: “sah-MAH-jay // PEE-rine” CHASE ROULLIER: “ROO-lee-ay” -REDSKINS-
  3. For Immediate Release April 28, 2017 REDSKINS SELECT LB RYAN ANDERSON, DB FABIAN MOREAU ON DAY 2 OF THE 2017 NFL DRAFT LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The Washington Redskins selected linebacker Ryan Anderson in the second round (No. 49 overall) and defensive back Fabian Moreau (No. 81 overall) in the third round of the 2017 NFL Draft. Anderson (6-2, 253) played in 57 career games at Alabama from 2013-16, recording 128 tackles (64 solo), 40.0 tackles for loss, 19.5 sacks, six forced fumbles and one interception, which he returned 26 yards for a touchdown. Last season, Anderson earned first-team All-SEC honors from the Associated Press following a senior campaign in which he registered 61 total tackles, a team-high 19.0 tackles for loss, 9.0 sacks, four forced fumbles, three fumble recoveries and three pass breakups. Anderson, 22, attended Daphne (Ala.) H.S., where he garnered all-state honors from the Alabama Sports Writers Association after a 105-tackle, 12-sack senior season in 2011. He was born Aug. 12, 1994. Moreau (6-0, 206) appeared in 51 career games at UCLA from 2012-16, recording 148 tackles (98 solo), 26 pass breakups, three interceptions, one forced fumble and one fumble recovery. Last season, he received honorable mention All-Pac-12 honors from the league’s coaches after leading his team with 10 pass breakups and contributing two interceptions to a Bruins secondary that limited opponents to a conference-low 12 passing touchdowns. Moreau, 23, attended Western H.S. in Davie, Fla., where he was named first-team All-County by both theSun Sentinel and Miami Herald after contributing at both running back and wide receiver. He was born April 9, 1994. NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF RYAN ANDERSON · Anderson is the 457th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 37th second-round selection in that time frame. He is the 55th second-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · With Anderson’s selection, the Redskins have now selected a defensive player with each of their last six second-round picks (DL Jarvis Jenkins, 2011; CB David Amerson, 2013; LB Trent Murphy, 2014; LB Preston Smith, 2015; S Su’a Cravens, 2016). It marks the team’s longest such streak in the Common Draft era. · The Redskins have now selected a linebacker in the second round in four consecutive drafts (Trent Murphy in 2014, Preston Smith in 2015, Su’a Cravens – who played predominantly at linebacker as a rookie – in 2016). · Including the selection of Alabama’s Jonathan Allen with the team’s first-round pick, the Redskins have now selected players from the same school with the first two selections of a draft since selecting Auburn’s Jason Campbell and Carlos Rogers with the team’s first two picks of the 2005 NFL Draft. · By selecting Allen (10.5 sacks in 2016) and Anderson (9.0), the Redskins have now drafted players that accounted for more than a third of Alabama’s Football Bowl Subdivision-leading 54.0 sacks last season. · The Redskins have now selected at least one pair of college teammates in four of the last seven drafts (Nebraska’s Roy Helu Jr., DeJon Gomes and Niles Paul in 2011; SMU’s Josh LeRibeus and Richard Crawford in 2012; Florida State’s Chris Thompson and Brandon Jenkins in 2013; Arkansas’ Martrell Spaight and Tevin Mitchel in 2015). · The 2017 draft marks the fifth time the Redskins have selected a pair of teammates out of Alabama (1941, 1948, 1951, 1962). · Anderson is the 23rd player from the University of Alabama selected by the Redskins all-time, joining B Riley Smith (1936), B Charley Holm (1939), E Sandy Sanford (1940), T Fred Davis (1941), G Ed Hickerson (1941), G Tony Leon (1943), B Bobby Jenkins (1945), T Fay Mills (1946), B Harry Gilmer (1948), B Lowell Tew (1948), T Dick Flowers (1949), E Ed White (1950), B Eddie Salem (1951), C Elliot Speed (1951), B Billy Hicks (1956), T Billy Neighbors (1962), E Tommy Brooker (1962), DB Steve Higginbotham (1972), DT Thomas Rayam (1990), T Chris Samuels (2000), G Arie Kouandjio (2015) and DL Jonathan Allen (2017). · The Redskins have now selected members of the defensive front seven in each of the first two rounds of the draft for the first time since 2011 (LB Ryan Kerrigan and DL Jarvis Jenkins). · Anderson is the fifth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 49 overall selection all-time, joining E Elmer Dohrmann (1938), B Walt Trojanowski (1946), T Bob Wetoska (1959) and DB Vernon Dean (1982). NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF FABIAN MOREAU · Moreau is the 458th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 34th third-round selection in that time frame. He is the 64th third-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · With Moreau’s selection, the Redskins have now selected a defensive player with their first three picks of a draft for the first time since 2009 (DE/LB Brian Orakpo in the first round, CB Kevin Barnes in the third round and LB Cody Glenn in the fifth round). Prior to 2017, the last time the Redskins selected a defensive player in each of the first, second and third rounds was in 1997 when the team picked DE Kenard Lang, LB Greg Jones and LB Derek Smith, respectively. · Moreau’s selection marks the second straight season in which the Redskins have selected a defensive back with their third-round pick (Kendall Fuller, 2016). · Moreau is the Redskins’ 15th selection of a player from UCLA all-time, joining E Dave Brown (1944), B Cal Rossi (1946 and 1947), E Roy Karrasch (1947), E Bill Clements (1949), B Joe Marvin (1952), T Gil Moreno (1956), C Art Kuehn (1975), QB Jay Schroeder (1984), RB Skip Hicks (1998), LS Jeff Grau (2002), FB Manuel White (2005), S Chris Horton (2008) and WR Terrence Austin (2010). · Moreau is the fifth player selected by the Redskins with the No. 81 overall selection all-time, joining T Wally Merz (1957), E Jim Kenney (1959), G Derrick Dockery (2003) and TE Chris Cooley (2004). -REDSKINS-
  4. And it begins. Here come the Bamas....
  5. April 28, 2017 Head Coach Jay Gruden On LB Ryan Anderson: “Ryan, we’re very excited about. He brings an attitude to this football team. Having a chance to talk to him in Tuscaloosa, I spent a lot of time with him watching him play. Talking to a couple of his teammates – obviously we drafted one yesterday – nothing but high praise for him, not only on the field, but his leadership and his tenacity to get after people to play hard, play physical, [and] bring a style of play here that we’ve been looking for.” On CB Fabian Moreau: “Fabian is an ultra-talented kid. He’s a three-year starter. He had the Lisfranc injury a couple of years ago [and] he started every game last year. Unfortunately, he hurt his pec [pectoral muscle] at his pro day lifting weights. But, he ran a 4.38 [and] 4.35 at the 40 [yard dash] at the Combine. [He’s] just really talented. He’s an ex-running back. What I saw at the East-West Shrine Game with him in one-on-ones, you could see his change of direction, his ball skills. But speed, I think upside, are the keys to Fabian and we’re excited to get him.” On what exemplifies Anderson’s attitude: “Just his tenacity. He’s a non-stop-motor guy. He plays extremely hard. I heard part of his interviews today [laughter]. I think he’s that type of guy. Watching film with him, he’s standing up watching film and talking about everybody’s job. He’s just a very high energy, high motor, tenacious guy and I think it’s going to rub off on a lot of people.” On selecting three defensive players with the team’s first three picks: “I think it is a good point that it is a good defensive draft. I think it’s well-noted amongst the experts, so to speak, there’s a lot of good players there. To get a quality corner, [Moreau] will probably be ready in September, hopefully. Get another outside linebacker, help our special teams, our pass rush, our attitude, and obviously get a big interior lineman that can rush the passer and play the run. Couldn’t ask for anything more, really.” On if there is a perception that Alabama players don’t produce in the NFL: “I think there was 10 drafted in the first three rounds, so they have a great football team. They always get the highest and the best recruits. They come there and they are well coached. Anytime you watch college football, and you watch other defenses, no disrespect, and then you flip on an Alabama game, it’s different. The speed is different. They are well-coached, they are in their gaps, they play hard, they play physical, and that’s from Week 1 until the end. That has to appeal to you as a coach. They are using their hands, they are physical, they are chasing the ball, they are running to the ball. Of course they have a lot of guys that can sub in and out, but they are just well-coached and we feel good about where they are from a mental standpoint from talking to them, getting to know these guys. We know they are both highly intelligent guys. They understand football, understand X’s and O’s and they both play very hard with a high motor and they are well-coached. So I don’t see any negative whatsoever with them going to Alabama – only positive.” On Anderson's size: "He's fine, he's strong, very strong… If he's playing outside, nobody runs outside. He's great at setting that edge. He’s one of the best I've seen at setting the edge in the running game. He's a very good pass rusher with his tenacity and he has made a lot of splash plays at Alabama. I think he had nine sacks this year, and a bunch of tackles for loss, a few forced fumbles. He's just all over the place." On if it is difficult to evaluate Alabama’s defensive players because of the overall talent on the unit: "I mean, that's one way to look at it, but we just look at production. We try to look at the way they get off, the way they finish plays, the way they run down plays. And I just know that every time you watch an Alabama game, you're going to see No. 22. He's going to make a play. He's all over the place. He may not have the same measurables as some of these outside linebackers or defensive ends that you're looking for, but he's not a measurable guy. He's a football player, and I know that's a cliché so to speak, but I don't think anybody can argue that's ever played with him or that's ever coached him that will say anything different about him. He just is productive, strong, strong-minded, mentally tough, and a great addition to the Washington Redskins." On if there was more debate about picks today: “Oh, yeah. There’s a lot of people to go through. There is debate. There is talks about who you want to take, but the fact of the matter is Ryan was one of our highest-rated guys, but we had other positions that we liked some other players at. But at the end of the day, I think what sets Ryan apart was just getting to know him, talking to him, talking to the coaches, talking to the players that’s played with him about the way he goes about his business. He’s no-nonsense, hard-nosed, obviously mentally tough. I mean, that sets him apart. That sets him apart from everybody.” On if there is a luxury in not needing Moreau to contribute immediately: “Yeah, we’ll see. I think he has a skill set there that is undeniable. You know, I think the speed, the length of his of arms… I think he’s got a good smooth pedal. I think he can run obviously. He’s good at bump-and-run. I still think he’s growing. You know, he’s only been playing, like I said, for three years, very similar to what we’re going through with [Quinton] Dunbar right here. We got another guy that can really run on the outside, you know, to go with obviously [Josh] Norman and [Bashaud] Breeland and Kendall [Fuller]. You can never have too many guys that are physical and can run. We play obviously a very tough division with Dez Bryant, now we have Alshon Jeffrey and obviously Brandon Marshall and [Odell] Beckham, so the more guys that can run, cover and hit, the better. On estimates for Moreau’s return: “I’ve heard September right now is the target date, but we’ll see when we get him down here. That’s the initial report that we have got” On if he talked with Alabama Coach Nick Saban specifically about Anderson: “Yeah, he’s one of the guys that we really have targeted for some time. Actually, we had thoughts about him possibly in the first round, quite frankly, because we didn’t know all these players were going to fall to us in the first. He is a guy that we had targeted up there in the top two rounds.” On Morgan Moses’s contract extension: “You love to see guys’ growth in your program. We’ve talked about that many times and he’s a perfect example. He came here, he played right tackle one year – freshman, I think – and then he played left tackle. We brought him in here, tried to switch him over, he wasn’t quite ready. He’s developed, he’s worked, he’s grown in the position, he comes in every day and works out and his production on the field has just gotten better and better and better every year. You can’t teach the length that he has. You take the length, he’s getting bigger and stronger with the work ethic that he has, it’s a no-brainer. You can’t find right tackles like Morgan Moses every day. This guy is a mountain of a man. He’s a great person and a great worker. I know Coach [Bill] Callahan has a lot of respect for him, as do all of us. We’re happy as heck to give him a contract for him and his family. He can be comfortable and come to work.” Linebacker Ryan Anderson On being selected by the Redskins: “It was amazing, man. It was amazing. It was amazing.” On who gave him the call: “[Head] Coach Jay Gruden called me.” On what his emotions were like receiving the call: “I can’t explain it, man. That’s the first time I’ve had that call. That’s something that I’ve been dreaming about since I was a kid, man.” On if he had talked with Jonathan Allen about playing together in the NFL: “No, man, I didn’t.” On what he thinks about being in Washington, D.C. with Allen: “Ah, man, it’s about to get real.” On if he had talked to the Redskins in the pre-draft process: “Yeah, I did.” On who he spoke with in the pre-draft process: [Answer unintelligible; poor phone connection] On what he thinks he brings to the Redskins: “I’m a playmaker, man. I’m a game changer. I’m a good teammate, man. I’m a good dude out of the locker room. I’m the old-smith football player. I’m not a combine warrior, not a workout warrior, I’m a football player. At the end of the day, that’s what it boils down to. It boils down to ‘see ball, get ball and striking the man in front of you.’ That’s what I bring to the table.” On if he tries to mirror any current players in the league: "No, no, no. I mean, I always grew up watching James Harrison and Trent Cole and Elvis Dumervil, but right now I'm working to set my own mold and break that mold. I'm going to be the best outside linebacker in the game. That's what I'm going to do. I want to be the best Ryan Anderson I can be." On what these last few months have been like: "Yeah, it's been hectic, man. Like I said, I'm just ready to get back to football. I want to enjoy the rest of this night with my family. That's what I want to do." On with whom he spent draft night: "My family." On what's going through his mind right now: "Just going from not knowing what was going to happen to getting the phone call, and now I'm getting my mind set on getting back to work. That's about it. I'm ready to just go enjoy the rest of this night with my family." On looking back on what it took to get to this point: "It's surreal, man. Like I said, it's emotional. Like I said, I just want to enjoy the rest of this night with my family… I'm a Washington Redskin." Defensive Back Fabian Moreau On getting the call from the Redskins: “This is just everything to me. I’ve been wanting this my whole life. I’m just ready to contribute, ready to win and ready to be a Redskin.” On if he was concerned about his draft position after his injury: “I knew it was up to God and I knew God had me, and wherever he wanted me to go, I know that was where I was fit to go. I wasn’t too concerned about it.” On how long his recovery will be: “Five months from March 22nd. I’m rehabbing right now and I should be ready [by] training camp.” On his pro day: “I just wanted to go out there and compete and compete with my teammates one last time. I just wanted to show everybody that I’m the top corner in this draft. Obviously I got hurt, but I just took it one step at a time.” On what his style of play is like: "I'm a physical, press corner. I like to get in the receiver's face. I like to challenge them. I like to make plays, and just be that dog out there helping my team win." On his transition from running back to cornerback: "I mean, I'd never played defense before, so it was challenging at first but I knew that this was something that I wanted to do. I just love that one-on-one matchup on the outside, man, and I just enjoy it and I love playing corner." On if he is excited to play alongside Josh Norman: "Yes, sir, and I'm excited to learn from him and just learn the game. Just learn everything and just pick his brain and just become the best corner I can be." On playing through pain against BYU “Yeah, BYU, I basically broke my foot, didn’t know how severe it was. Obviously I was in pain but I wanted to be out there with my teammates. I wanted to show them that I’m fully committed and I came back in the last drive of the game. The game was on the line, BYU was going down to try to score, and so I went out there, ran out there with my teammates. Myles Jack got the interception and we just sealed the victory. I ended up getting surgery two days later.” On his pre-draft communication with the Redskins: “I went on a visit and the visit went well. I felt like I fit their style of play. I’m just happy to be a Redskin.”
  6. April 27, 2017 Head Coach Jay Gruden On Jonathan Allen: “There really wasn’t anything not to like, really. We like his size, we like his strength, we like his ability to rush the passer, play the run. He’s a very versatile guy – he can play all the positions on defensive line. Really, never in a million years did we think he would be there at 17, but we’re happy-as-heck he was. There was not a lot of debate in there – we put the card in and took a heck-of-a football player and a great person.” On if there were any injury concerns for Allen: “We didn’t have any concerns. We talked to Dr. [James] Andrews and he gave us the thumbs up on him. Plus, we feel very good about the injuries. As far as him falling to us, there were a lot of things that happened in the draft. Three quarterbacks went, a couple of receivers went pretty high, a lot of offensive players went that probably not a lot of people expected, so some of these very good defensive players fell to us. We’re happy. It’s something that we really wanted to upgrade our defensive line obviously [and] to get a player like that, a leader like Jonathan. Talking with Coach [Nick] Saban at the University of Alabama last week, [he] had nothing but high praise for him – his character, his play on the field, what he does off the field, what he means as a leader to that Alabama football team. This is just a great pick. It’s a no-brainer. You’re taking a great person, a great player, a big body, a guy that can do a little bit of everything on defensive line.” On if there was temptation to move up in the draft as Allen fell closer to No. 17: “There was a couple of guys that were slipping that we really liked. We were in a very good situation. We had two or three guys that we really felt good about with that pick. But Jonathan had our highest grade and it was an easy pick for us.” On waiting several minutes to turn in Allen’s selection: “You just want to wait and see if there’s an offer too good to refuse maybe, but just we talked it over – the staff, defensive staff, scouts. It’s an important time. We don’t need to turn in the card right away. But we talked about it and it was a consensus deal and we are happy as heck about it.” On Allen being the team’s first defensive selection in the first round since linebacker Ryan Kerrigan in 2011 and if he now imagines the possibilities with those two playing together: “Yeah, it’s exciting and it’s something we needed to do. That’s a great point because it was the first [defensive] pick we’ve had in the first round we since Kerrigan. You talk about upgrading your defense, well you have to pick a guy high. You have to take the best at the position, and he’s the best defensive lineman we thought in the draft. Like I said, we never thought he would be there, but the chance to really add another big bodied guy who can do a lot of different things… Add him with [Terrell] McClain, Ziggy [Hood] and the guys that we have in the building – the Laniers [Anthony Lanier II], some of the young guys, [Stacy] McGee. We think we have a pretty good group now.” On Allen saying he ‘blacked out’ from excitement on the phone call: "Well, there was a long pause on the phone. I thought we got disconnected there. I think we were both equally excited. He's a local kid obviously, so he's close to home now and he's a Redskins fan and we're obviously a fan of him." On what it is that he can bring to the front: "Versatility. You talk about our front, we have guys that can play the run pretty good, but this guy can do everything. He can line up at a 3, he can line up at a 5, he can line up at a nose if you want him to. He can stunt, he can play the run, but he can rush the passer. In the last two years, I think he has 22.5 sacks, 25 or 30 more hurries on the quarterback and that versatility is hard to find this day and age in defensive linemen, it really is. Big bodied guys usually are just run stoppers, they're not able to rush the passer as effectively as he is. And that's a big need for us." On when he sees Allen’s contributing: “He’s the 17th pick in the draft. He will contribute – tomorrow. Right now.” On what Allen gained by returning to Alabama for his senior year: “I think any time you can add that type of work your senior year, especially when you’re getting coached by Coach Saban and that staff over there at Alabama and to play with that team and be a leader on that defense that’s so successful, I think it can only benefit you, really. And he could’ve come out last year and been a first-rounder too, but it just shows the type of character he is. He wanted to go back to school and finish with his guys. Just talking to Coach Saban, he had nothing but great things to say about him, obviously. Really it was wishful thinking, I thought. I said there’s no way, I don’t even want to ask questions about Jonathan. There’s no way he’s dropping. Luckily we did. And we know a lot about the kid. He’s a local kid. We’re tickled to death to get him.” On if he saw improvement in Allen’s run defense from his junior and senior seasons at Alabama: “Well, no question. He’s gotten a little bit stronger, he’s a better player. Anytime you have another year in the system, you’re going to be a better player. I think he played the run a lot better this year and obviously added to his sack total. He was voted the best defensive lineman in college football so there’s a reason for that. He’s doing multiple things well, you know? It’s not just one thing. That’s the thing that really draws you to him. It’s like, OK, he can stop the run, he can rush, he does it all. Not to mention his character off the field is top notch.” On if he entertained any calls about a potential trade for Kirk Cousins: “Not one call. Not one. There was no talk about it. Nothing.” Defensive Lineman Jonathan Allen On playing close to home: “It’s a blessing. It’s only something you read about in books – it doesn’t even seem real. For me to be going back home to Washington, it’s honestly just the biggest blessing I could have ever received.” On if reported medical issues affected his draft position: “You know, I don’t know, that’s a tough question. I feel like it was definitely in the back of some teams’ mind. I don’t know. At this point, I’m really not even worried about that. I’m just blessed and happy to be a Washington Redskin now. I’m looking forward to getting to work and proving I belong there.” On how much he followed and knew about the Redskins: “You know, I’m always – I knew about the Redskins. The last couple of years, I kind of fell off because I was at Alabama. Honestly, when I was in college, I really didn’t watch too much football. But, growing up, that’s who you root for. I still remember days where I went to the first summer practice when I watched Donovan McNabb when we first got Donovan McNabb. It’s just crazy that I’m actually going to be out there playing with them now.” On how he describes his game and if he patterns it after anyone: “I feel like I’m a very versatile player. I’m able to do many things in many different positions. As for players I try to style my game after, kind of two guys that come to mind are Geno Atkins and Aaron Donald out of the Rams. Those are two guys that I love to watch and just clip-ups of them whenever I got the opportunity to.” On what things he learned from watching them: “Just the mentality that they had going into every play. I mean, you never see those guys take a play off. Just their tenacity and how they play they play the game is just what I love about them the most.” On how he can contribute given recent departures on the Redskins’ defensive line: “I’m looking to come in and make an immediate impact, but that comes through hard work. I’m looking to come there and just bust my butt and try to contribute to the team in any way possible.” On why he returned for his senior season: “I feel like there was things that I still needed and wanted to accomplish. Looking back, there were some things I wanted to improve on in my game before I made that transition to the next level, and I feel like I accomplished what I wanted to accomplish by going back.” On what he wanted to improve upon by returning: “Definitely my run game. My run game was definitely something that I really wanted to come back and really stout up before I headed to the next level because up until that point, I really wasn’t asked to do it as much. So by doing that, I definitely feel like I’ve improved my run defense.” On areas which he can still improve at the next level: “Making this next jump to the NFL is just the beginning for me. I still have a lot of room to improve – football knowledge, my body, physically, mentally, emotionally. Anything you can think of, so I’m just going to try to be a sponge and absorb as much I can and take in as much as I can. Just bust my butt every day.” On who called him from the Redskins and what the conversation was like: “Coach Gruden and the owner. And I’m going to be honest, I was so emotional, it was hard for me. I kind of blacked out, I feel like, so I don’t really remember the specifics of what was said. But I do remember him saying, ‘We didn’t think we’d get you but we’re blessed and lucky to have you.’ And I said, ‘No, I’m lucky that you took me.’ But it was a great conversation.” On who is with him at the Draft: “From my family, I have my fiancée, I have all my brothers and my little sister, my brother’s kids and his wife, uncles, aunts, friends, high school coach and his wife. So just a ton of people here.” On his journey with his family: “I mean, this has been a long time coming, just all the hard work and dedication you put [in], just to see it payoff is amazing. So, I mean, this is just the beginning of my journey. Hopefully I have a long and successful career with the Washington Redskins.” On how Alabama prepared him for the NFL: “I definitely feel well prepared to take this next step. Mentally, from a mental aspect, that is something I am very proud of. It’s something that Coach [Nick] Saban really pushed, you know, when your college. So I feel like that’s one aspect that I’m very well prepared with, but with that being said, I don’t know because if I’ve never been through it. So I’m going to go in there and just take it day-by-day and trust the process.” On what it was like to sit and wait longer than anticipated to be picked: “It’s tough. I mean, it’s tough. But when you do get that phone call, it’s definitely a load off your shoulders. So to receive that call was just a blessing.” On which NFL player he looks forward most to tackling this season: “You know, I haven’t even thought about that yet, you know? If I had to choose, I would say Tom Brady only because in my opinion he is the greatest quarterback to ever play the game, so just to have that opportunity would be a blessing.” On if he gets to go home after practice now because he lives so close: “To my home, hopefully. Definitely going back is exciting but I kind of want to branch out and make my own way, you know? So I’m excited but I definitely will be spending a lot of weekends at the family's house.” On if his slide down the draft board will be extra motivation: “I mean, to an extent, but for me, my motivation is to prove why the Redskins were right and smart for drafting me. That’s going to be my motivation. So, I mean, it’s definitely going to sit in the back of my mind, but I have a job and I have a business to do, and that’s what I’m going to do.” On if his shoulders have affected him during games: “It hasn’t affected me. Especially this last year, I didn’t even wear a brace for the season. So, I mean, it doesn’t affect me. Every team I talked to, shoulders were medically cleared, no problems. Probably the best I’ve felt in the last four years, to be honest.” On if there is any maintenance he needs to do for his shoulders off-the-field: “Nothing that the average football player doesn’t have to do. Obviously, you’re going to have aches and pains from playing football, but, I mean, football and having a successful career is all about taking care of your body, and that’s for every player – whether you have a history of injuries or not. So that is definitely something I take pride in.” On if he can see himself becoming a leader: “Oh, definitely, 100 percent. You always look for that leadership role. But, I mean, in due time it’s all about respect. And I feel like the easiest way to earn respect is through hard work. That’s what I’m planning and that’s what I intend on doing.”
  7. For Immediate Release April 27, 2017 REDSKINS SIGN T MORGAN MOSES TO MULTI-YEAR EXTENSION LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The Washington Redskins announced today that they have signed tackle Morgan Moses to a multi-year contract extension. Full terms of the deal were not disclosed. Moses (6-6, 335) was originally selected by the Redskins in the third round (66th overall) of the 2014 NFL Draft. He has appeared in 40 career regular season games with 33 starts, including starting each of the last 32 regular season games for the Redskins since earning a starting role prior to the 2015 campaign. “I look back at the past three years and being here and just being blessed to play here – and I look back at three years ago where I was at the draft – to be here where I’m one of the first guys in my class to sign a big extension, it just shows you that if you stay blessed and you stay true to your process, anything can happen,” Moses said. “It’s a big deal for me to be here because I have so many things in the community that are working for me and for others here, so to be here and be hands-on with it, it’s going to allow me to do some great things.” After being limited to eight games by a Lisfranc injury in 2014, Moses has since become one of five Redskins players to start all 16 regular season games in each of the last two seasons. Moses’ teammates awarded him with the team’s Ed Block Courage Award for his play in 2015 following his comeback from the injury. Since the 2014 season in which the Redskins allowed 58 sacks, the Redskins have allowed only 50 total sacks in Moses’ two seasons as a full-time starter from 2015-16, the second-fewest in the NFL in that time frame. Last season, Moses and his offensive line colleagues helped power the Redskins to single-season team records in yards per game (403.4), yards per play (6.40), net passing yards (4,758), completions (407), passing first downs (226) and 500-yard games (three). Moses played collegiately at Virginia, where he started 42 of the 48 career games in which he played. He earned second-team All-ACC honors as a senior in 2013, helping the Cavaliers produce their first 1,000-yard rusher since 2004. Moses, 26, attended Meadowbrook H.S. in Richmond, Va., becoming a two-time all-state, all-region and all-district selection. He was born March 3, 1991.
  8. For Immediate Release April 27, 2017 REDSKINS DRAFT DL JONATHAN ALLEN WITH NO. 17 OVERALL PICK LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The Washington Redskins selected defensive lineman Jonathan Allen in the first round (No. 17 overall) of the 2017 NFL Draft. Allen (6-3, 286) played in 57 career games at Alabama from 2013-16, recording 154 tackles (78 solo), 45.0 tackles for loss, 28.5 sacks, seven pass breakups and three forced fumbles. His 28.5 career sacks rank second in Alabama history, trailing only College and Pro Football Hall of Famer Derrick Thomas. As a senior and team captain in 2016, Allen played in all 15 games, contributing 69 tackles (33 solo), 16.0 tackles for loss, 10.5 sacks and also contributed two touchdowns on fumble returns. A unanimous first-team All-American selection, he earned the Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Chuck Bednarik Award and Ted Hendricks Award and helped lead the Crimson Tide to a berth in the national championship. Allen appeared in all 15 games of Alabama’s national championship campaign in 2015, compiling 36 tackles (19 solo), 14.5 tackles for loss and 12.0 sacks. He earned first-team All-SEC selections from the Associated Press and the conference’s coaches. Allen also earned first-team All-SEC honors as a sophomore in 2014 after recording 33 tackles (16 solo), 11.5 tackles for loss and 5.5 sacks in 14 games. A year earlier, he appeared in 13 games and contributed 16 tackles (10 solo) and 3.0 tackles for loss as a freshman. Allen, 22, attended Ashburn’s Stone Bridge H.S., approximately five miles from Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park. At Stone Bridge, Allen was a first-team Parade All-American and was the recipient of the 2012 Gatorade Virginia Player of the Year award. He was born Jan. 16, 1995. NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF JONATHAN ALLEN · Allen is the 456th selection made by the Redskins in the Common Draft era (since 1967) and the 28th first-round selection in that time frame. He is the 59th first-round selection by the Redskins all-time since the institution of the draft in 1936. · Allen’s selection snaps a two-year streak of the Redskins selecting an offensive player with their first selection in the NFL Draft (Brandon Scherff in 2015 and Josh Doctson in 2016). He is the first defensive player to be the first selection of the Redskins in a draft since the team chose Trent Murphy with their first selection (a second-round pick) of the 2014 NFL Draft. · Allen is the first defensive player selected by the Redskins in the first round since the team drafted two-time Pro Bowl linebacker Ryan Kerrigan in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft. · Allen’s selection marks the first time the Redskins have selected a defensive lineman with their first selection in a draft since 2009 when the team selected defensive-end-turned-linebacker Brian Orakpo in the first round. The last time the Redskins selected a player that remained along the defensive line with their first selection in a draft was in 1997, when the team selected DE Kenard Lang, coincidentally also with No. 17 overall pick. · Allen becomes the third Bronko Nagurski Award winner (awarded annually by the Football Writers Association of America to the best defensive player in the nation) selected by the Redskins since the award’s inception in 1993, joining Orakpo (2009 NFL Draft) and Champ Bailey (1999). · Allen is the second Chuck Bednarik Award winner (awarded by the Maxwell Football Club to the best defensive player in America) drafted by the Redskins all-time since the award’s inception in 1995, joining LB LaVar Arrington (2000 NFL Draft). · Allen is the second Ted Hendricks Award winner (awarded by the Ted Hendricks Foundation to college football’s top defensive end) drafted by the Redskins since the award’s inception in 2002, joining Orakpo (2009 NFL Draft). (Note: 2013 Ted Hendricks Award winner Jackson Jeffcoat also spent part of the 2014-15 seasons with the Redskins after entering the league as an undrafted free agent with the Seattle Seahawks) · Allen becomes the first Alabama product selected by the Redskins in the first round since the team chose six-time Pro Bowl tackle Chris Samuels with the No. 3 overall pick in the 2000 NFL Draft. Foster is now the fourth Alabama product selected by the Redskins in the first round all-time, joining Samuels, B Riley Smith (1936), B Harry Gilmer (1948) and B Lowell Tew (1948). · Allen is the 22nd player from the University of Alabama selected by the Redskins all-time, joining B Riley Smith (1936), B Charley Holm (1939), E Sandy Sanford (1940), T Fred Davis (1941), G Ed Hickerson (1941), G Tony Leon (1943), B Bobby Jenkins (1945), T Fay Mills (1946), B Harry Gilmer (1948), B Lowell Tew (1948), T Dick Flowers (1949), E Ed White (1950), B Eddie Salem (1951), C Elliot Speed (1951), B Billy Hicks (1956), T Billy Neighbors (1962), E Tommy Brooker (1962), DB Steve Higginbotham (1972), DT Thomas Rayam (1990), T Chris Samuels (2000) and G Arie Kouandjio (2015). · With Allen’s selection, the Redskins’ 22 all-time picks from Alabama broke a tie with Penn State (21) for the third-most all-time draft selections from any single school in franchise history. The Crimson Tide now trail only Notre Dame (34) and USC (30) in Redskins draft history. · Allen becomes the first Southeastern Conference product selected by the Redskins in the first round since selecting LSU’s LaRon Landry with the sixth overall pick in the 2007 NFL Draft. · Allen becomes the fifth player selected by the Redskins all-time with the No. 17 overall pick, joining B Red Knight (1947), DT Bobby Wilson (1991), DB Tom Carter (1993) and DE Kenard Lang (1997).
  9. For Immediate Release April 27, 2017 REDSKINS MAKE ROSTER MOVE LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The Washington Redskins announced today that they have made the following roster move: The Redskins signed the following free agent: OL Quinton Schooley
  10. http://www.wwe.com/shows/ecw/ecwlaunch WWE® Launches ECW® As Third Brand STAMFORD, Conn., May 25, 2006 - World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc., today announced the official launch of ECW (Extreme Championship Wrestling®) as a brand extension to its RAW® and SmackDown® franchises. After acquiring the ECW assets in 2003, WWE spent the past few years re-introducing ECW to the global WWE audience and increasing the interest in its unique brand of sports entertainment. To date, WWE has successfully released three ECW DVD’s, all of which have become best sellers, and produced a very profitable ECW pay-per-view event in June 2005, with another ECW pay-per-view scheduled for this June 11, 2006. With consumer interest at an all-time high, WWE is introducing ECW as a complementary brand to RAW and SmackDown. “After keeping the ECW concept alive and creating an enormous cult-like following for all things ECW from DVD’s to PPV’s to books, we feel that now the time is right to officially launch ECW as its own stand-alone franchise,” said Vince McMahon, WWE Chairman. “RAW, SmackDown and ECW now represent a portfolio of WWE brands for fans of all ages and interests to enjoy.” Similar to WWE’s RAW and SmackDown brands, WWE will produce, market and promote a full line of ECW products from television programs to pay-per-views to live events to licensed consumer goods. In a related announcement, The SCI FI Channel today announced it would start airing one-hour episodes of a new ECW live television program, debuting June 13 at 10 p.m. ET. (more on this announcement) World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. (NYSE: WWE) is an integrated media and entertainment company headquartered in Stamford, Conn., with offices in New York City, Los Angeles, Toronto and London. Additional information on the company can be found at wwe.com and corporate.wwe.com. http://www.wwe.com/shows/ecw/scifi WWE® BRINGS ECW® TO SCI FI CHANNEL New York, N.Y., May 25, 2006 - SCI FI Channel today announced that World Wrestling Entertainment®, the producer of the No. 1 weekly basic cable TV series, “Monday Night RAW “on USA Network, will debut a summer series on Tuesday, June 13, at 10 p.m. ET/PT. ECW (Extreme Championship Wrestling®) will be an alternative brand of wrestling suited to fit the SCI FI Channel’s commitment to fuel the imagination. "Research tells us that there's a healthy appetite for wrestling among SCI FI viewers," said Bonnie Hammer, President, USA and SCI FI Channel. "With ECW, we're able to deliver to those fans unique action with a twist that's perfect for SCI FI." “ECW on SCI FI will push the boundaries of sports entertainment in new and unexpected ways,” said Vince McMahon, Chairman of World Wrestling Entertainment. SCI FI Channel is a television network where "what if" is what's on. SCI FI fuels the imagination of viewers with original series and events, blockbuster movies and classic science fiction and fantasy programming, as well as a dynamic Web site (www.scifi.com) and magazine. Launched in 1992, and currently in 85 million homes, SCI FI Channel is a network of NBC Universal, one of the world's leading media and entertainment companies. World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. (NYSE: WWE) is an integrated media and entertainment company headquartered in Stamford, Conn., with offices in New York City, Los Angeles, Toronto and London. Additional information on the company can be found at wwe.com and corporate.wwe.com. http://www.wwe.com/shows/ecw/news/ecwglobal ECW Going Global May 26, 2006 WWE Chairman Vince McMahon has big plans for ECW. In fact, in a Friday afternoon interview with WWE.com, McMahon revealed, “We are taking the ECW brand global.” Going worldwide with the likes of Paul Heyman, Tommy Dreamer and Sabu, however, is miles away from where ECW was prior to its closing in 2001. In fact, stationed out of Philadelphia, many looked at ECW as just a northeastern wrestling promotion. But the recently re-launched ECW will not have much of a struggle making an impact both here in the United States and overseas. In fact, according to Mr. McMahon, ECW already has plans for its own Merchandising and Licensing, International Sales, consistent Live Event schedule, as well as its own set of pay-per-views. But with so much of WWE’s global enterprise behind it, can ECW be expected to be the same ECW it was when it developed its cult-like following in the late 1990s and early 2000s? “We will bring forward many of the more legendary characters of ECW’s past,” said McMahon regarding today’s ECW. “But it can’t be the same. That’s pretty much impossible. It’s now five years later. A lot of the performers now have five more years under their belt, and the ECW style has taken a great deal out of them. This is something that the ECW audience already realizes. They know that if ECW was still in business today, they would be very different from what they were five years ago.” While the re-launched ECW will undoubtedly be different from the original ECW, McMahon is adamant that the brand will not stop pushing the envelope, nor will it be like the already successful WWE brands SmackDown and RAW. “It will be an alternative, there’s no doubt about that,” claimed the WWE Chairman. “It won’t be shot the same way we shoot SmackDown or RAW. It’ll have a different feel. It will be more gritty. There will also be more imagination put into concepts and characters. But at the same time, there will need to be a delicate balance because there are three masters to serve. There’s the small, vocal ECW audience. Then there’s the SCI FI audience that is accustomed to things more SCI FI. And obviously, you have to also be true to our broader audience in terms of what sports-entertainment is today.” With so much of the vision of the new ECW brand already mapped out, many wonder what took WWE so long to re-launch the brand. According to McMahon, it was all about timing. “Over the last several years, we have been busy re-establishing the concept of ECW without it having to be its own brand,” said McMahon. “Now, with the success of The Rise and Fall of ECW DVD and the success of last year’s One Night Stand pay-per-view, it just seemed right. And it feels like this year’s One Night Stand pay-per-view will be a launch to re-establish the brand.” So with the launch of the re-established brand right around the corner, will former ECW head Paul Heyman have a role? “Absolutely,” exclaimed McMahon. “But at the end of the day, Mr. McMahon is in charge.”
  11. Binged the first two seasons of Silicon Valley on HBO. Pretty funny so far.
  12. April 24, 2017 Director of College Scouting Scott Campbell Opening statement: “I just want to open by saying, I want to thank all of the scouts, the coaches – I don’t want the questions to start rolling and forget to say thank you and appreciation for all their work. It’s been a long process for the scouts. Started back in August, the coaches have gotten involved after free agency, and I just wanted to say thank you to all of them. Even on the scouting side, we’ve had some guys step up, do extra work. The pro scouts had to go out and do some pro days, college scouts have had to do extra cross-check reports, so I’m very thankful and appreciative of their work and it’s going to pay off big time this weekend.” On the approach to the draft: “Well, basically, you know, on the college side before we even get to this point in the draft, you don’t really know in August what your team needs are going to be, and some of the needs you think you may have are not the needs you end up needing and vice versa. So we start the process building the board, ranking our players, grading our players, it doesn’t have anything to do with our team needs. I’m not really going to get into specifically what our needs are, but in terms of evaluation, that doesn’t have any effect on how we evaluate players. So, we’re going to have the list, we’re going to have them ranked, you know, top to worst, and approach it from there… The approach we used when I did the board a couple years ago.” On players with character concerns: “Well, just off the bat, by policy we don’t announce who’s on the board and who’s off the board. Character is very important to me. It’s important to the Redskins. Our scouts do a great job getting a lot of information. Of course, some of the incidents you’ve brought up happened after the season, at the Combine and just a few days ago. All those things are factored into the evaluation as they’re gathered. But, you know, we don’t announce who’s on and off the board for strategic reasons. Our policy’s that way. But I will say it’s very important to me to get the right kind of guy in here to help us win, make us better, and I think character is a big part of that.” On the process for evaluating players' character: “What I’ve always told the scouts – and how I was trained 30 years ago when I started – is when you start to evaluate guys in the beginning, you don’t factor in the character. You don’t grade character, you grade talent. So you don’t throw away somebody early that may have some redeeming quality, or there’s a side to the story you don’t know about. You grade football players as football players first on talent, and then when it comes closer to the draft, you start weeding all that, getting more information, deciding, ‘OK, this guy’s not our kind of guy, this guy’s not a Redskin, this guy could be drafted, but good luck to him.’ I hope that answers the questions in terms of how we evaluate guys with character risk.” On what insight Head Coach Jay Gruden brings in the draft process: “I think the good thing with Jay… I scouted with his father on the road, so he’s the son of a coach and a scout and then in Cincinnati, the coaches are very involved in the draft process, going to all the pro days. I think Jay takes a lot of pride and has a lot of fun in doing the evaluations, so that’s great for us when you get a head coach that likes scouting, understands scouting and likes being a part of it... I scouted with his father, Jim, was with the 49ers at the time when I was an area scout for the Atlanta Falcons, so I knew his father on the road.” On balancing combine performance against a player's performance in games: “I’m kind of old school, I guess I can say that now. I’m in my mid-50s, been scouting 30 years now, but the tape is the most important. The games or how they play, the tape is always the fallback. The combine helps you get to know the players as a person, it gives you good information on the physical part of it, the doctors, and you fill in some numbers. We don’t know exactly how tall they are, how much they weigh, how fast they are, so that gets factored into it. Of course, all those things are important to play pro football. But at the end of the day, it comes down to watching the tape and seeing what kind of player they are on tape. That’s the most important thing.” On if there are certain points of the combine on which he focuses more: “Not specific drills, per se. It’s kind of the whole combine. What I do, when they go through their drills, I put a plus or a minus, plus-minus, all the different drills they do, and so if you add up your plusses and minuses, you kind of have a feel and an impression, and I’ll do like an A/B/C grade as they do the drills. In terms of the combine itself, it’s the 15 minute interviews we get to do. Just the first impressions is my favorite part of the whole process.” On how much he tracks and evaluates other teams’ drafts: “First thing, the win-loss record and championships. You start looking at the teams that win, the teams that win the divisions all the time, the teams that were in the Super Bowl [and] in contention all the time. You just start studying how they all do it, and really, you come to the conclusion that the draft is the key. Teams that turn the corner suddenly after two or three years, you can go back and look at their drafts, and they’ve hit on the top players and bottom players. The goal we always have is how you’re going to make your team better, and you look at the teams that are successful, most times it’s through the draft, and you have got to hit on those draft picks. It’s not an exact science. No one hits 100 percent. Whether it’s the [New England] Patriots, they’ve missed players, on down to the teams that are in the playoffs it seems like almost every year like Green Bay [Packers], and then you supplement through free agency, I think that’s the pattern that I’ve seen and most people have seen is make sure you hit on your drafts.” On the common denominator in those teams’ successes: “Obviously, it starts with the leadership of the scouting department that guides and gives the scouts direction. Then, however the team is structured. Some, the coach is the boss, some the GM is the boss, so it’s definitely the leadership of the team – the GM’s or the head coaches. [Baltimore Ravens General Manager] Ozzie Newsome, you can’t say enough great things about Ozzie Newsome and what they’ve done. That’s a team I’ve studied, the Ravens, since he’s been there. How do they keep having successful teams? The common denominator [is] who’s been the guy there pulling the trigger, whether it’s coaching hires or the draft picks. I think it’s the leadership in charge, from the GM to the coach, however the team is setup.” On the tight turnaround before Day 3: “Definitely for that last day, the board’s starting to get picked clean in terms of you still have guys maybe you like or you didn’t like, so there's maybe a reassessing of maybe what directions we’re going to be going that day, but most of the work is done pre-draft. So it’s all ranked top to worst, so you’re excited that guys are there. I think you see a lot of trades to move up at the beginning of the day because everyone’s reassessed, like, ‘We’ve got this guy, he was our third-rated corner, or we had a guy in the second round that’s still there, so let's trade up and get him before waiting whenever our pick is.’ There’s a little bit of that going on, but mostly, the work’s already done. You just kind of reassess who you may have a chance at.” On the level of pressure for this year's draft class: “Always pressure. Every year’s pressure. I grew up in an NFL household. My dad was a coach and a player for 40 years. Pressure every year to perform, that’s what the NFL is. You’ve got to perform every year. It takes a couple of years to develop a class. People are saying the ‘14 class had some success. Well, if I read articles and see what happened and what was said right after that draft, our grades in the mock drafts were not very good. It takes time. Morgan Moses didn’t start his first year, you know, but he’s come on to be one of the best right tackles in the league. That’s my opinion anyway. It takes time to develop. I still think with time, that class [2016] will be just fine.” On Scot McCloughan's influence on this draft board: “Well, he certainly had influence on it because we all met as we always did the last couple of years and every team does. You meet right after the all-star games before you go to the combine and kind of get an initial ranking of how you like the guys. Of course Scot hadn’t been here since, so just like when he was here before, there’s adjustments being made to the board with the new information. We did that with Scot also, so it’s not just like we use that information then we’re done and we’re just sitting around waiting for the draft. There’s still information being done, information added and guys are being moved up and down with the information. Certainly his influence is there from the initial boards.” On the capital of entering the draft with 10 picks: “Yeah, I don’t know if you can have ‘too many guys.’ I think the main thing to get better is you want to add competition to the team and anywhere you can add competition, even positions where you think you may be set depth-wise, you know, add more competition. Get the best players in here and I think it pushes each other and makes everybody better. In terms of using the picks to acquire more picks, moving up or down certainly, having three rounds with two picks in them this year is exciting and I hope we can add more. As we talked about earlier, it’s not an exact science. You’re not going to hit on all the guys. You’d like to think you can, but I mean that’s not reality, no one’s ever done that. Just increasing the odds of adding the more players, the more guys that can help us, that’s great. I certainly hope we can maybe take the two fours and move up or gain more picks and that allows us maybe to drop more if we see a little pocket of players there that we’re interested in.” On drafting for need or drafting the best available player: “I guess as you asked the question, you kind of framed it and the way I’m going to frame the answer, and the age-old answer of ‘I’m going to take the best player available.’ And if that serves your needs, that’s a bonus. Certainly ideally you have enough different players, there is not one sitting there like a left tackle. If a left tackle is sitting there, that is really not a big need for us – maybe you guys have a different opinion. Then you are going to go in a different direction than that and hopefully you have guys graded in that pocket where you’re not really reaching for position. You are taking another position that you may need better.” On the approach at quarterback: “We are approaching it like we do with all the other positions. For the integrity of the board, you have to grade all the positions. I mentioned the left tackle, we can’t just say, ‘We got Trent Williams, we can’t evaluate the left tackles.’ You have got to evaluate all the quarterbacks, all the other positions just like all the others, for the integrity of the board to kind of keep the balance and understand what’s going on there and decide what direction you’re going to go once you do that. So in my mind, when you enter it, all positions are open, everything is open and then you decide as you move along and the board starts to flow.” On if decisions will be made "by the board": “Right now the scouts and myself have been aligning the board. The coaches have started to get in their reports to us and we have starting meetings with them to start to gain their input because they can see from a scheme standpoint maybe how a guy would fit or wouldn’t fit. So they may really like a guy and we don’t like a guy, we have the discussions. They might not know as much about the character, their learning, their work ethic and all that type of stuff. So it’s all hashed out still over the next couple days.” On who will be involved in setting the board: “Bruce [Allen] will be involved, definitely, and Jay, of course. Everyone will be involved in the final Redskin grade at the end of the day. And the goal is to not have panic on draft day. You want to have all that stuff… You don’t want to have a brand new argument break out right there before you’re picking. That’s ridiculous. I’ve never seen that happen in any team I’ve been with. It’s all been worked out, hashed out. The argument’s already been had, because really by then it’s too late. You’ve got to go with how they are.” On who will decide on potential trades: “Really, the way we have the room when the draft is ongoing is we have… Eric Schaffer and Alex Santos are constantly calling teams above us. They’re taking the phone calls from the other teams – also behind [us]. A lot of times per Bruce’s instructions, he’ll say, ‘Hey, you take these five teams. You take the next five teams. Start making calls.’ And then we’re receiving calls too at the same time. Once they get that information, they’ll tell the table in the front and say, ‘Hey, we can trade back for this, we can trade up for that.’ It would be me and Bruce and Jay saying ‘No, no, we’ve got enough guys there’ or say ‘I like these guys,’ or like, “Hey, there’s guys there.’ So it’s kind of a discussion amongst the people, and most times it’s Bruce saying, ‘Just tell them we’re not interested,’ or he says, ‘Get the league on the phone. We’re going to make that trade.’” On how his role has changed in recent years: “I guess it’s changed slightly in the sense that when Scot [McCloughan] came on board, he told me, ‘You just worry about the college draft. That’s all I want you to worry about. Just go see the players.’ Me and him sharing responsibilities for looking at as many guys as we can. Before he had gotten here, I had to oversee the personnel on the pro side also. That restricted my travel in terms of the pro days. I never went to pro days hardly ever up to that point all through the Shanahan years and even that first year with Jay. I didn’t go to pro days; there was too much to do here in the office. But with Scot, when he came in, he told me just to worry about the college – be the college director – that allowed me just to focus on that and not any of the other stuff. I’m out four or five weeks doing pro days every year. To me, that’s been the biggest difference and has allowed me to really get a feel for guys and in turn help him because he was the one trapped here more at the office, so to bring back more information to him. I can give you an example. Jamison Crowder, going to see his pro day in person after the combine and to come back and give the report on that and say, ‘This guy was outstanding. If we’re interested in a slot-type guy that can be an excellent punt returner, this would be a guy. And he had not run quite as well at the combine, so that’s an example of going to the pro days – for me – that I learned there’s value in going to the pro day and seeing guys like that that can help the team win. We’re just trying to get guys to help the team win. That’s just an example where I didn’t do that in the past and have been able to.” On the challenges of evaluating college quarterbacks: “Well, it’s gotten tougher and tougher because the colleges, there’s a handful of teams that run a pro-style offense. You can’t really just watch a guy play, so what does that leave you with? It leaves you with just studying their physical attributes. Are they athletic? Can they move in the pocket? How quick is their release? Can they read the defense? And some of those systems limit what they’re going to be asked to do. Some of those, that Air Raid offense, they’re not asked to make multiple reads and all that kind of stuff. They’re working off of one side of the field. You have got to start digging more on the guy as a person, how much he likes football, is he going to put the time in to study it? Because, ultimately, that’s what he’s going to have to do. He’s going to have to learn a whole new system. It makes it much tougher to project a guy’s success." On if it is frustrating having to project college quarterbacks outside of pro-style offenses: “I don’t view it as frustrating, it’s kind of just the way of the world. You talk to other college coaches out there and they have trouble too. The high schools, they’re all running the spreads or options or whatever, so they have the same problem we do in finding those types of guys. I haven’t found it frustrating. It’s challenging, but it’s part of it." On signing undrafted free agents: “It gets pretty crazy. Again, there’s going to be guys left on the bottom of that board that didn’t get drafted that we had rated as draftable. So that’s our No. 1 targets. I assign a scout to all the coaches, and really the coaches talk to the players – once the draft ends, let me be clear, it’s after the draft ends when we start making calls – the scouts are on the phone with the agent finding out what our competition is, how much. Eric Schaffer kind of coordinates how much money we can spend on each player. We just target those guys that are left on the board first, then we have top-of-the-tier free agents, we try to get all those, though some of those guys have been drafted. But everyone that’s left up there, that’s who we’re frantically chasing and trying to sell opportunity. At that time, you’re talking five-, 10-thousand, you’re not talking millions of dollars. You’re selling opportunity to come in, win a job and get a contract, ultimately, for those guys." On evaluating players who play multiple positions: “It can be challenging if you get a guy that’s physically a tweener size or maybe speed-wise is somewhat tweener, meaning he doesn’t really fit one position or the other. I think just a pure athlete, it’s pretty simple. A pure athlete you plug in almost anywhere. I reminded the guys a couple days ago – Champ Bailey played receiver at Georgia as well as corner. It didn’t hurt his evaluation at corner at all.” On positions of depth in this draft class: “Well, I’m excited because I think it’s one of the strongest, deepest classes on the defensive side of the ball that I’ve seen. I’ve told the guys upstairs I’m excited because we’re going to get better. I know there’s going to be a guy sitting there at 17 or if we want to move back, there’s enough thickness of the group. And several different positions – sometimes it’s just maybe defensive line or outside backers or corners. Across the board on defense, I’m really excited about the class and the guys we’re going to bring in are going to help us. So if I have to identify any kind of trend or something I see in the board itself, I think the defensive side of the ball is pretty good.” Closing statements: “I just want to say, and it kind of comes off of the question you just asked, I’m excited about the opportunity to get the Redskins better. It’s a great draft class. The guys have worked hard. We’re prepared and the main thing is getting better. That’s the goal with the draft and I feel very, very confident and excited about the chance that we’re going to be able to accomplish our goal of getting better.”
  13. For Immediate Release April 24, 2017 REDSKINS RE-SIGN LB WILL COMPTON LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The Washington Redskins announced today that they have re-signed restricted free agent linebacker Will Compton. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Compton (6-1, 238) has appeared in 48 career regular season games with 30 starts since joining the Redskins as a college free agent in 2013. He has compiled 249 career tackles (146 solo), two interceptions, one sack, one forced fumble and three fumble recoveries. Last season, Compton started all 15 games in which he appeared, recording career highs in tackles (104, including 60 solo), passes defensed (five), fumbles recovered (two), fumbles forced (one) and matching his career high in interceptions (one). He was elected as the team’s defensive captain prior to the season. Compton, 27, played collegiately at Nebraska after attending North County H.S. in Bonne Terre, Mo.
  14. STATEMENT BY AN NFL SPOKESPERSON: Trent Murphy of the Washington Redskins has been suspended without pay for the first four games of the 2017 regular season for violating the NFL policy on performance enhancing substances. Murphy is eligible to participate in all offseason and preseason practices and games.
  15. Nothing like pulling a cooler out of storage & finding out it didn't get cleaned out as well as it should have & having to trash it. Then spend half a day running around to half a dozen stores to find a replacement for it. Luckily the last Wally World I hit up had ONE which saved me from having to order it online & hope it got here in time. Lesson here is always clean your ****ing coolers out as soon as you get them back home.
  16. For Immediate Release April 17, 2017 FEDEXFIELD WILL TRANSFORM INTO A STADIUMLINKS GOLF COURSE JUNE 9 THROUGH 11 LANDOVER, Md. – Stadiumlinks, the event series that transforms prominent sports stadiums into exclusive golf courses, will team up with FedExField to become a nine-hole golf course June 9 through June 11. Tee time bookings are now officially available to the public at stadiumlinksgolf.com. “This event gives the public the rare experience of hitting some of the most memorable golf shots imaginable from nine different locations throughout the stadium,” said Jon Stephens, founder of Stadiumlinks. “Targets for each tee box are positioned on greens that are landscaped into the field below, creating nine one-of-a-kind golf holes that you’ll have to see to believe. By combining this with exclusive and intimate access to the stadium, we’re excited to offer a unique experience for each and every participant.” Tee times are offered across all days of the event starting at 7 a.m. and ending at 8 p.m. with the stadium lights illuminating the course as the evening progresses. Due to the logistics of the event, registration will only be offered in two-person and four-person bookings with prices that start at $75 per person. A premium VIP upgrade will be offered during the registration checkout, giving participants the opportunity to stay after completing their round in one of FedExField’s luxury areas overlooking the stadium at play (among other additional VIP perks that are included in the upgrade). Participation spots are extremely limited and are expected to sell out in advance of the event. -REDSKINS-
  17. It'd also help if he NOT hit the Like button on the post he reports.
  18. From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 1: Steelers at Redskins (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 2: Cowboys at Redskins (Photos by Spaceman Spiff) From the ES Photo album 2016 Week 3: Redskins at Giants (Photos by TK) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 4: Browns at Redskins (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album Redskins at Ravens - Week 5 (Photos by Spaceman Spiff) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 6: Eagles at Redskins (Photos by Spaceman Spiff) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 7: Redskins at Lions (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 9: Vikings at Redskins (Photos by Spaceman Spiff) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 11: Packers at Redskins (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 12: Redskins at Cowboys (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 13: Redskins at Cardinals (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo album 2016 Week 14 - Redskins at Eagles (Photos by TK) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 15: Panthers at Redskins (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album 2016 Week 16: Redskins at Bears (Photos by themurf) From the ES Photo Album Redskins vs. Giants 2016 Week 17 (Photos by Spaceman Spiff)
  19. Just found my standard go to when the weather gets warm, Sam Adams Summer Ale. Also so just saw Duclaw now has a coffee variant of Sweet Baby Jesus called Sweet Baby Java. Kroger has picked up their game & started carrying a few Firestone Walker IPAs. Small Town Brewery has followed up Not Your Fathers line up with a Not Your Mothers lineup- Iced Tea, Apple Pie, & Stawberry Rhubarb Pie. The Tea, I swear it tastes just like a Lipton with lemon bottled tea. It disappeared quick. The Apple Pie is damn good too, while the Strawberry hits that tart/sour spot.
  20. My copy was right. Just sayin'.
  21. Because you were never Broken.